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executive function - initiate - and bp


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i cannot get a grip on this executive function thing. i have a hard time getting started doing anything! and i hear a lot of people do.

what i don't understand is that i have had this since childhood. sat in front of tv. no hobbies. no initiative.

can it be something not related to bp? i was diagnosed at 32 but don't remember having any bp problems when i was younger.

from what i have gathered, there really isn't anything you can do about it. even add meds don't work.

am i wrong? is there something i can do?

why does this seem to be such a big problem with no real solutions? am i wrong?

thank you,

kathy

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i cannot get a grip on this executive function thing. i have a hard time getting started doing anything! and i hear a lot of people do.

what i don't understand is that i have had this since childhood. sat in front of tv. no hobbies. no initiative.

can it be something not related to bp? i was diagnosed at 32 but don't remember having any bp problems when i was younger.

from what i have gathered, there really isn't anything you can do about it. even add meds don't work.

am i wrong? is there something i can do?

why does this seem to be such a big problem with no real solutions? am i wrong?

thank you,

kathy

I dunno if you're wrong. I'm BP2 not BP1. I know w/BP2, we struggle constantly with the low energy, the overage of the apaptive gene that says to lay low and wait till the shitstorm blows over (and how fracked up that gene excess can be when it's interpreting everything as a storm to be hunkered down under, ;) ).

Executive function for me improves when I'm exercising regularly and using my dark therapy for sleep. As soon as the slightest variation in sleep level or exercise level happens, I'm off to hunker-down land. Meds can only do so much.

One thing my doc taught me is to not take this as a sign of my own motivational weakness of some defect in me. It's just the genetics doing their thing. I gotta do my thing to help my genes out. When I do, exercise and sleep properly, I get off my ass and get stuff done (and my wife, agent and editors love me :) ). When I don't or when my hypomania isn't kicking in, yeah, I'm a lump on a log.

The biggest thing is getting exercise when I'm in hunker-down, low-e mode. That's where my exercise pals help. When I don't have them, I have trouble. There's really nothing I can do about it. I need others to ride or play soccer with and to get me out the door nearly every time. If there's a disability side to this, :) it's in the reality that I need others to help me live better. I just wish I could affrord to pay a trainer sometimes to show up and kick my ass. Sometimes I can do it myself but not for more than a day or two usually, then I have to have help. I look at that like I look at meds, I gotta take 'em. I gotta exercise and sleep right.

Speaking of which, I gotta go hang some bikes before my beach crew gets back.

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It can definitely be something besides BP. Executive dysfunction can be a symptom of something else, or it can show on its own. My son has serious executive dysfunction, which might be a symptom of his anxiety, or it might not. Some doctors have attributed it to him having ADD, but I don't believe that is the case (I'm no expert, just a mother).

I don't believe that there isn't anything you can do about it. However, EF encompasses different things. It's initiation, organization, follow through, memory, writing, being on time, planning, etc. For a lot of people these skills do not have to be learned, they come naturally. For others they do need to be learned, like learning how to tie shoes, or multiplication tables. I think, however, for people with executive dysfunction learning these skills can be difficult, but definitely worth trying. You can also learn skills to work around your deficits.

School, as well as life, can be difficult for people with EF deficiencies, as I can see in my son. Frequently these problems are mistaken for laziness, lack of motivation, or lack of desire to be organized, which compounds the problem. I hired a tutor to help my son with organization and planning skills. Maybe a life coach would help?

Here is an article that I saved when I was researching EF. It's more geared towards younger students, especially those with ADD, but I found it helpful in understanding EF.

http://www.chrisdendy.com/executive.htm

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