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Thoughts that I know are stupid.


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I've had two doctors now say I have OCD traits or have OCD so... I guess I belong here.

I have these thoughts about people like I think I know them- as if I can tell if they are "good" or "bad" and I can't make them go away and I know they are stupid and they are embarrassing. I also have the thoughts about getting shot, which I know are wrong.

And pictures of bad things. I think bad things are going to happen a lot. Whether it be that someone is going to drop a glass or that a bus is going to crash into me.

Anyway. The neuropsychologist I saw today said it sounded more like OCD causing this than the bipolar causing these particular thoughts because I know they are wrong and I can't get them out of my head and they just keep coming back and won't go away.

Other people have thoughts that they couldn't tell were from one thing or another?

Does this sound OCD-ish? I don't know. People have been telling me to look at OCD for a while and maybe I'm in denial.

I don't know why I'm writing this.

There's more to my thoughts, but I don't want to write them down because they seem bad and wrong. Today was the first time I told a professional about them specifically other than the getting shot one, but I guess that's been enough in the past.

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The reluctance to talk about the thoughts because they seem wrong is a big part of why so many people with OCD don't get diagnosed and treated properly for years.

If you haven't picked up the Hyman (I never get over how unfortunate that name is) OCD workbook, snag a copy. CBT won't make the thoughts go away but it can help you accept them and not be obsessed with them.

I have violent intrusive thoughts that used to make me suicidal because I thought I could be a potential serial killer. You can bet those never came up in therapy. I'd see a stranger walking by and randomly think of sexualy mutilating them and get totally freaked out.

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The reluctance to talk about the thoughts because they seem wrong is a big part of why so many people with OCD don't get diagnosed and treated properly for years.

If you haven't picked up the Hyman (I never get over how unfortunate that name is) OCD workbook, snag a copy. CBT won't make the thoughts go away but it can help you accept them and not be obsessed with them.

I have violent intrusive thoughts that used to make me suicidal because I thought I could be a potential serial killer. You can bet those never came up in therapy. I'd see a stranger walking by and randomly think of sexualy mutilating them and get totally freaked out.

Heck yeah, I know I'll never tell a therapist or doctor that I have to walk far away from the knives in the kitchen in case I decide to stab myself or my husband or kids. Or that I have to drive in the center lane of a bridge because I might decide to drive over the edge. These thoughts freak me out too, but I know if I tell someone I'll probably get turned in.

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Those are some of the most common obsessive thoughts people have with ocd. I have the knife thing and the wanting to drive the car off the road thing. Speak up about it to your respective docs, they've heard it all before.

On a good note, I have actually made it through two (Count them, 2) thunderstorms without freaking out. What helped me finally after 13 years of battling this. My new bible, Brain Lock Freeing Yourself from Obsessive Compulsive Behavior. By Jeffrey M. Schwartz, MD. Link HereAnd this one indeed teaches you how to greatly minimize those thoughts if not rid yourself of them altogether. I have hope for the first time that I can conquer this. Talk therapy didn't help with shit. Of course YMMV, but I for one have seen real-life improvement.

Croix

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A member here once told me that OCD cyclic traits can be brought on by bipolar cyclic states. Sorry I can't explain it more.

You can only disclose what you feel comfortable disclosing. Therapists and pdocs hear this kind of stuff on a regular basis. I have disclosed some pretty nasty stuff and no ones thrown me into the psych ward yet. My therapist and psychiatrist have consulted back and forth on some of the issues (the big one being that I am possibly a danger to my children), but they havent locked me away yet.

I didnt tell anyone for a long time about these recurrent intrusive thoughts because I was scared that they may send me to the state hospital in Kaneohe. But when I realized that I needed to tell because my thoughts could be dangerous, I spoke up.

I just wnated to chime in and say that its not automatically a lock her up and never let her out kind of thing.

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See, I don't do that a whole lot. I have a touch of it but nothing big. It gets worse at certain times though just like everything else.

I know jack about OCD, other than the fact that I'd only wish it on people I seriously dislike, but I think that like every other MI it probably has different styles or types for screwing with people's heads.

Comorbid problems like bipolar, epilepsy, ADHD, DID, schizophrenia/schizoaffective could override the OCD on occasion by derailing mood, activities, trains of thought, or even personalities. Autism may fit in there too.

I have these thoughts about people like I think I know them- as if I can tell if they are "good" or "bad" and I can't make them go away and I know they are stupid and they are embarrassing.

Whether you call it a "first impression" or "prejudgement" I think everyone does this, and it can be very hard - for most people - to replace the incorrect thoughts with the correct understanding.

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I have these thoughts about people like I think I know them- as if I can tell if they are "good" or "bad" and I can't make them go away and I know they are stupid and they are embarrassing.

Whether you call it a "first impression" or "prejudgement" I think everyone does this, and it can be very hard - for most people - to replace the incorrect thoughts with the correct understanding.

But there's a difference between a first impression and thinking you can see into someone's soul or something.

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Whether you call it a "first impression" or "prejudgement" I think everyone does this, and it can be very hard - for most people - to replace the incorrect thoughts with the correct understanding.

But there's a difference between a first impression and thinking you can see into someone's soul or something.

OK, yes, that does go quite a bit further. I imagine that it's disturbing as hell at times.

The irony is that you, the crazy person, know it's not true, while there are far too many officially sane people who think that they can do exactly that.

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