Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Stanford Clinical Study


Recommended Posts

HA! That is the study that I wentto a few months ago and they refused me with the claim that I have epilepsy. Sorry bout that...UPMC is doing the same exact study...I am assumong that Stanford and UPMC are linked some how.

The study is great though they will pay for all meds in my instance it was going to be paxil and a low dose of lithium. They were studying the effects of mood disorders/depression and lithium. It is worth a try for those of you with no medical problems at all...that is one thing they want...no neurological disorders as well as cardiovascular issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A month's supply of lithium is probably way cheaper than the gas & your time to get back & forth to the study (check out CostCo's prices).

Which drug company is paying for the research?

I partook in a study for the "free treatment." They said that they'd pay for the meds, but in fact, I paid. The "free treatment" was lab work that was only useful to the study. I still had to maintain w/ my regular doctor. Student interns provided the "treatment." I took off time from work & my intern came in slowly finishing her lunch, oblivious that she had inconvenienced me by being an hour late. Also, they required that I discontinue my antidepressant. When I became depressed, they tried to convince me to stay off of it, though my doctor recommended otherwise.

I think many of these studies rely on consumers to subsidize their tests. Using the universities is a bargain for the drug companies, with free student labor, etc. Maybe I'm just being cranky, but I'd be careful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has nothing to do with drug companies, actually. It is through NIMH, the National Institutes of Mental Health. This is a national research organization. The same study is taking place at multiple universities across the country.

Most clinical research studies pay participants for their time in addition to paying for meds and so on. If traveling is involved, they usually pay travel expenses too. I don't know the compensation details for this particular one. As an example, I participated in a NIMH study that only involved a phone interview, some written questionnaires, and a blood sample, for which I was paid $100.

edit: [link=http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00667745" target="_blank]Here[/link] is the general NIH page for this study, including all locations, and a detailed description. The "optimized treatment" is another drug, one that is considered accepted treatment for bipolar disorder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They pay you $50 for each visit (total $750). You get either the optimized tx (meds), or meds + lithium. The intake person told me that my pdoc for 6 months would be their pdoc. i'll email her with regards to the psychotherapy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good point on NIMH, Sorrel. Who else would study Lithium? ;) (Lithium has been off patent and cheap for many, many years.)

Carmex, based on what I've gathered from the posts, you sound new to this and not yet stable. If that's true, I'd focus on working with a good pdoc until you stabilize. Any drug study you participate in could randomize you to the placebo control group, or in the above study, the optimized treatment goup which I'm guessing doesn't include meds. (I could be wrong, but that's how I read it.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, Carmex, I thought you did not even have a bipolar diagnosis, in which case you would not qualify for this. In any case, I agree that if you are working on getting stabilized then participating in a study is a bad idea. (Although, this study has no placebo control group; the control is a mood stabilizing medication other than lithium.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both groups are treated with meds, the difference is 1 includes lithium, the other does not. The link to the NIMH summary is very informative. I'm pasting it here don't know how to do quotes. this is taken from the nimh site.

"1: Experimental Participants will receive lithium plus optimized medication treatment, as needed. Drug: Lithium Carbonate Lithium will be started at 300 mg and then increased to 600 mg after 3 days. Lithium doses will be maintained at 600 mg per day for 8 weeks, but may be adjusted after that time as needed up to a serum level of 1.2 mEq/L. Drug: Optimized Treatment (OPT) The foundation of OPT is to maintain treatment that will typically include at least one FDA-approved mood stabilizer other than lithium (e.g., divalproex, carbamazepine, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone) and to follow the recommendations summarized in the evidence-based stages of the Texas Implementation of Medication Algorithm (TIMA) revised guidelines.

2: Active Comparator Participants will only receive optimized medication treatment, as needed; lithium will not be used. Drug: Optimized Treatment (OPT) The foundation of OPT is to maintain treatment that will typically include at least one FDA-approved mood stabilizer other than lithium (e.g., divalproex, carbamazepine, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone) and to follow the recommendations summarized in the evidence-based stages of the Texas Implementation of Medication Algorithm (TIMA) revised guidelines."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found out last Tuesday that pdoc dxd me with BP mixed... He wrote it down for my disabilty paperwork. I'm already on 15mg of Zyprexa (olanzapine) as a mood stabilizer, so it wouldn't actually hurt me much. I'd be continuing the same tx plan as my current pdoc. My main reason for being interested is because I use the county mental health clinic, and am uninsured. I see my pdoc for 10 minutes at best per appointment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dx, last week, wow Carmex. Welcome to the club.

I personally would advise anyone with Bipolar disorder to NOT go into any studies that monkey with their meds until they've been stabilized for at least a year or two. It seems to me that it takes people a year or more just to get a handle on being bipolar, and having experienced several episodes so that they know what to do without losing control.

Participating in studies is noble and important to advancing treatment, but be cautious of false economy.

Best, a.m. ;)

[edit] Oh, yes, Talk this out fully with your pdoc and don't apply for the study unless he is fully in favor of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...