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i feel as though i don't need one on one therapy. i go to a CBT group and a support group weekly, and its been helping a lot. i just don't know how an individual therapist can help. i also dont have a budget right now for therapy... should i just try to see if the two group things are enough to keep me grounded? i am pretty stable on meds right now, no episodes for two weeks.

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If you're doing well with the CBT and support groups, I'd think it's fine to stay with that. I had a great experience with CBT group therapy when I had PPD. I'm currently seeking individual CBT myself, but that's just where I'm at right now, you know?

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Personally, therapy never did anything for me. The only positive thing it did for me was make me drag my ass out of bed when I didn't think I could--only because I was going to have to pay regardless. There were times, however, that I knew I wasn't going anywhere for any length of time so I'd call ahead and cancel (completely counterproductive, I know).

Anyway, therapy never provided me with any information, advice, or coping skills that I didn't already know or was aware of. And maybe that was just because I had a shit-ass therapist; who knows. It works for some people, but apparently, doesn't work for everyone.

Especially, with being bipolar--and my psychiatrist agrees--it's far more of a drug-therapy illness than a therapy-therapy one. If you're brain's all effed, like it would be with bipolar disorder, and your meds aren't in check, screw the idea of anything else working. Yoga it up all you want; it's not going to alter brain chemistry to the extent that we need it to.

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I hate to admit it, but I don't go to therapy. It's for two reasons: 1)no money, and 2)I've had 7 therapists that did absolutely nothing for me. I had everything from the "let's talk about your miserable childhood for a year" therapist to the honest-to-goodness therapist who was a bipolar wanna-be (this freak would say things like "I'm like you because I only sleep 4 hours a night"). The longest I stayed with a therapist was a year, the shortest (for money reasons) was two sessions. I also have problems paying to talk to someone about something I've already discussed over and over again in my head. Because that's all I do all day long - talk to myself in my head about *everything*.

When I get financially straightened out, I would like to go to therapy sessions such as CBT. I've heard it's very beneficial to people like me, with paranoia and anxiety as well as the BP. But my insurance is funny, and only contracts mental health services to one large clinic, and I'd have to see if any of the therapists do CBT there.

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Carmex - if the CBT group and the support group are working well for you, I'd continue on with that, unless your therapist or your psychiatrist are actually suggesting something more for a specific reason.

Unless you have a very specific goal or symptom to address, I don't see why you'd add more. "Therapy for therapy's sake" has always seemed silly to me.

That being said, once the CBT group is done, after a break, a psychoeducation group for bipolar disorder can be really helpful - but, you know, down the road, not right away, etc. And just going through the Fast or Miklowitz book will give you 80-90% of what you need for that. (Or I can find you the link to the actual text on psychoeducation for bipolar disorder by Colon/Viera, if you want, but the other books are probably more readable.)

I'm assuming the CBT group is time-limited, since they usually are.

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