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Changing from a MAOI to a SSRI


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Guest Vapourware

Hi,

I have been on Aurorix (MAOI) for about a month and I have been advised to change to Zoloft (SSRI). I don't mind the changeover, as I think Aurorix is simply not working. Just wondering if anyone else has ever done the MAOI to SSRI swap-over? I am slightly anxious about the dangers that can occur.

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@nonewmsgs: From some of the literature I have read, they seem to imply that MAOIs are usually the very last resort. Mainly because they are not as effective as, say, SSRIs or SNRIs.

I hope you can find a drug that works for you.

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Actually they are known to be very effective, but there are strict dietary and drug restrictions, and they are more toxic in overdose than the SSRIs. Therefore docs are less apt to prescribe them. They have pulled many people back from the brink, though, when nothing else has worked.

Greeny

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MAOIs are the most effective anti-depressants out there, but -- of course -- they don't necessarily work equally well for everyone. The main reason they're not prescribed more is the dietary restriction and ease of suicide attempts.

That said, I have made the transition. You'll need to step down the MAOI slowly and then go without anything for two or three weeks before you start the SSRI.

Good luck!

Fiona

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Guest Vapourware

Thanks both.

Are MAOIs actually the most effective ones out there? Interesting. I was always under the impression that SSRIs were the most effective. Looks like I might need to read more.

@Greeny: I think you are referring to the older MAOIs [i.e. Parnate]. Aurorix is a new-generation one and comes with no dietry restrictions - unless you start taking a very high dosage, such as any dosage over 600mg.

@Fiona: Thank you, looks like I probably shall have to wait a while before starting on Zoloft.

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Wow thanks for mentioning a new M.A.O.  i am going to ask the pdoc about it.Strange that it doesn't have the huge list of food that is a no-no,that sure would be nice. Usually the m.a.o. drugs take along time to kick in and be carefull because they take a long time to stop.What i don't like about the new drugs since prozac is for me they don't allow me to be crazy enough to paint or do music which you have to be nutty to do in today's anti art society (just my take on it )

  Good luck switching and make sure you take the alloted time to get the M.A.O. out of your system.....

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@stipple: No worries. I am not sure where you live; in Australia it is called "Aurorix" while in Canada it is called "Mannerix" [or "Manerix"]. The generic name is "Moclobemide".

I think technically it is classified as a "RIMA" - Reversible Inhibitor of MAO type A - but it works in a similar way to older MAOIs.

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Are MAOIs actually the most effective ones out there? Interesting. I was always under the impression that SSRIs were the most effective. Looks like I might need to read more.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

SSRIs are quite effective for most people, and have far fewer and far more tolerable side effects -- so they're more often prescribed. Why put people through the diet and so forth if Prozac is likely to do the job.

I don't know much about moclobemide, I've taken both Parnate and Nardil (and am taking Parnate). Their effectiveness is about the same as ECT, only without that scary electricity thing. I consider Parnate a miracle, and I've tried most other Ads on the market.

Fiona

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