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After taking Lexapro to Effexor to Cymbalta for the last four years I'm completely off the stuff and through the withdrawal stages.

All said and done I feel fantastic.

I just wanted to say to all of you, no matter how bad things are, not matter how low you feel, it will eventually get better.

Here's some advice that greatly helped me.

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Guest, I'm glad that you were able to go off your meds and regain your happy life. However, we have many people here with clinical depression, which is not cured by thinking happy thoughts and being positive.

If depression could be cured by being positive, I never would have gotten depressed in the first place. I'm the most positive person I know and I still suffer from depression.

By the way, if you want us to take you seriously, and if you want to be a part of this community, please register and become a member.

olga

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the one thing I'd add to olga's post is to be careful and please watch out for symptom returns...I went off medication as well because I'd been symptom free for a good 6 years. What happened was that fairly soon after I got off, something traumatic (unexpected and terrifying) happened, triggering another episode that was actually worse than the first. I can't say that it wouldn't have been triggered, even if I were on medication still, but I doubt that it would have been as bad.

so, just be careful...it can come back. I don't say that to be scary, just to let you know the reality of it all.

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Blah... Someone who thinks they've discovered the cure to depression by thinking positively. I'll throw up my "you aren't the first person to think this idea up" banner and run around my living room for awhile.

It's always fine when you're between episodes. *Everyone's* cured between episodes. It's when the chemicals or brain cooties or whatever hit you and you become depressed again you realize thinking positive didn't do you jack.

Come back in ten years and post the same thing. Then maybe I'll think about changing my mind.

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Positive thoughts, huh? Who knew that's really all it took. All this time I've been choking down these oh so wonderful meds with all their fantastic side effects when all along, all I ever had to do was think happy shiney fluffy rainbows and butterfly thoughts.

*going into kitchen to throw meds in trash*

Thank you guest. Thank you so much for your sage advice. If I could have read this post of yours over 10 years ago, I could have saved myself all those years of mental and emotional turmoil. Just think where I could be today if you were around to give me that advice back then. I could have made something of my life had I harnessed the power of positive thought. I mean, you shouldn't feel bad at all that my life turned into such a clusterfuck. You can't be everywhere all the time spreading your wisdom. No, some folks just have to live lifetimes of pain and suffering because you can't be everywhere all the time. Have you considered carpet bombing major cities with flyers? Think of all the people you could help!

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You know what, guys? Let the dude believe what he/she wants. We know what we know and that is really all that matters. When you are diagnosed with a mental illness and it truly takes over a great part of your life, well, you know this is bullshit.

I am also of the belief that some people have been unnecessarily medicated for feeling "down" or "blue" when really there was no problem to begin with. Yes, some doctors do jump the gun. Feeling "depressed" is different than having "depression." So, if having a positive attitude and all that jazz was the cure to all that ailed him/her, it was quite possible that there was no chemical imbalance to begin with, but simply a natural flux in moods. There is a huge difference.

I am just trying to be diplomatic and offering up a possibility.

Congrats, guest, for not being on meds. That is fantastic. Please, though, go be a ray of sunshine somewhere else.

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I think it's great that some people are able to go med free. I hope I will one day be one of those people.

Positive thoughts aren't going to cure mental illness... but I agree that I think they can really help. I HATE when tell me that positive thinking is all it takes, though. I'm the biggest optimist ever and incredibly positive... but I still need medication. However, I think I'm better off thinking positive thoughts than negative ones.

So the idea is a good one in theory. It's just not even CLOSE to being a cure.

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Positive thinking is nothing more(not to minimize it) than a coping skill. Yes, we can get better at coping skills. I have spent more than 300 hours availing myself to many methods of education and coping in the past year. Both medications and general "wellness/coping" skills will probably be with me the rest of my life.

It almost seems the OP is advocating "med non-compliance". I just can't support that method as one of wellness.

As I think it was Ophelia who said something along the lines of having been mis-diagnosed from the beginning, then there were really no MI issues from the beginning. Why would one be on meds, and at some point they discovered they were on them due to mis-diagnosis or an over zealous GP, continue on that route?

I am glad anyone or someone can get off meds. I just don't at this point think it's conducive to my wellness.

Deepster

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The meds always come back. No matter how hard you try to hide. If you have depression you will eventually cave and take meds you know have nasty withdrawls and side effects just to feel a little less depressed.

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i prefer to think of whips on bodies and chains on ankles for my happy thoughts...

LOL reddog, thank you for the only giggle I have had today! I didn't know you were into that..hmmm.

But seriously folks, not to give cred to the anonymous poster, what about us folks that seem to get very little to no benefit from antidepressants? After a while, every AD I take quits working. I have been on Cymbalta now for 3 years which is a record, and that has been off and on, plus tried almost every one ever put on the market and many have made me feel MORE depressed.

Considering that I have had 6 suicide attempts and many thoughts of it, plus the last few days unable to get out of bed, I think the Cymbalta has run its course.

Any thoughts?

Oh and to the OP, I am glad that thinking positively works for you, but as someone above said, clinical depression is not cured with happy thoughts.

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Considering that I have had 6 suicide attempts and many thoughts of it, plus the last few days unable to get out of bed, I think the Cymbalta has run its course.

Any thoughts?

This is something my pdoc and tdoc and I have discussed at length. They both feel that meds can only do so much, and that changing behavior, learning coping skills, and going to therapy are what really get you to 100%. That doesn't mean I don't believe that people who are treatment-resistant don't exist, just that if you find yourself not getting better or only getting partial relief over and over, it's worth trying to see what gains you can make with therapy and meds together.

And I firmly believe that meds, changing behavior, learning coping skills, and going to therapy will work best if you eat nutritious foods, get daily exercise, go to bed and get up at the same time most days, etc. (Maybe this is what Susan meant by "changing behaviors.") If you don't have healthy lifestyle habits, you will never, ever feel terrific. It just isn't possible to have good energy and a lively interest in things, and a happy outlook if you don't get enough rest and eat good food and exercise.

The other activity I always advocate is volunteering somewhere. The quickest way to realize how lucky you are is to dish out soup in a homeless shelter or hand out sandwiches on the street to the homeless people. Or volunteer in a Head Start program if you enjoy children.

olga

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Considering that I have had 6 suicide attempts and many thoughts of it, plus the last few days unable to get out of bed, I think the Cymbalta has run its course.

Any thoughts?

This is something my pdoc and tdoc and I have discussed at length. They both feel that meds can only do so much, and that changing behavior, learning coping skills, and going to therapy are what really get you to 100%. That doesn't mean I don't believe that people who are treatment-resistant don't exist, just that if you find yourself not getting better or only getting partial relief over and over, it's worth trying to see what gains you can make with therapy and meds together.

And I firmly believe that meds, changing behavior, learning coping skills, and going to therapy will work best if you eat nutritious foods, get daily exercise, go to bed and get up at the same time most days, etc. (Maybe this is what Susan meant by "changing behaviors.") If you don't have healthy lifestyle habits, you will never, ever feel terrific. It just isn't possible to have good energy and a lively interest in things, and a happy outlook if you don't get enough rest and eat good food and exercise.

The other activity I always advocate is volunteering somewhere. The quickest way to realize how lucky you are is to dish out soup in a homeless shelter or hand out sandwiches on the street to the homeless people. Or volunteer in a Head Start program if you enjoy children.

olga

I've heard this sort of thing often. And the only thing I can ever think is "gee, nothing in my life has been achieved through luck." I guess you could say that having my health (sort of) is kind of lucky. Then again, one has a lot of control over that as well.

*sigh* I dunno. Just sayin.

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Guest, I'm glad that you were able to go off your meds and regain your happy life. However, we have many people here with clinical depression, which is not cured by thinking happy thoughts and being positive.

If depression could be cured by being positive, I never would have gotten depressed in the first place. I'm the most positive person I know and I still suffer from depression.

By the way, if you want us to take you seriously, and if you want to be a part of this community, please register and become a member.

olga

Amen sistah!

Congrats, guest, for not being on meds. That is fantastic. Please, though, go be a ray of sunshine somewhere else.

Oh my god..I have missed this place! Thank you Ophelia! That was priceless

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Sounds like some form of cognitive behavioral therapy has worked for you guest. Congrats to you, but don't assume it works for everyone.

Though it is kind of nice to hear a success story for a change, I'm not sure here is the right place for it...

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Considering that I have had 6 suicide attempts and many thoughts of it, plus the last few days unable to get out of bed, I think the Cymbalta has run its course.

Any thoughts?

This is something my pdoc and tdoc and I have discussed at length. They both feel that meds can only do so much, and that changing behavior, learning coping skills, and going to therapy are what really get you to 100%. That doesn't mean I don't believe that people who are treatment-resistant don't exist, just that if you find yourself not getting better or only getting partial relief over and over, it's worth trying to see what gains you can make with therapy and meds together.

And I firmly believe that meds, changing behavior, learning coping skills, and going to therapy will work best if you eat nutritious foods, get daily exercise, go to bed and get up at the same time most days, etc. (Maybe this is what Susan meant by "changing behaviors.") If you don't have healthy lifestyle habits, you will never, ever feel terrific. It just isn't possible to have good energy and a lively interest in things, and a happy outlook if you don't get enough rest and eat good food and exercise.

The other activity I always advocate is volunteering somewhere. The quickest way to realize how lucky you are is to dish out soup in a homeless shelter or hand out sandwiches on the street to the homeless people. Or volunteer in a Head Start program if you enjoy children.

olga

I've heard this sort of thing often. And the only thing I can ever think is "gee, nothing in my life has been achieved through luck." I guess you could say that having my health (sort of) is kind of lucky. Then again, one has a lot of control over that as well.

*sigh* I dunno. Just sayin.

Beetle, I don't see anything about "luck." Both Susan and I are advocating therapy, meds, changing behaviors, learning coping skills, exercising and eating well. There's no luck involved in any of that: it's plain old hard work. Boring as hell sometimes. If you have good health, you are very lucky indeed.

olga

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