Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Recommended Posts

Well, I guess the simplest answer is that it probably starts where most genetic issues start - random mutations in the genetic code.

But it's not that simple. It's not that there is a "bipolar gene" that is passed down. Mental illness is affected by many different genes, and even then, they only determine vulnerability, not what WILL BE. It's a complex interplay of environment and a number of different genes, and I think even top researchers don't fully understand it. Some people with the genetic vulnerability will never encounter the right environment to bring mental illness into full bloom, and some people without the vulnerability will still end up with MI.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was Neanderthal Bob. He wooed sweet little Lucy human with his energetic guile and charms way pre-BC. He sealed the deal one fine spring day by luring the Woolly Mammoth off the cliff single handedly. He was accepted by the tribe, which of course was a bit unusual for humans to let one of their own wed a Neanderthal seeing as how there was a lot of discrimination back then, but that is what they did. Over time they came to accept that Bob had most useful periods of invincibility but that they eventually depleted his energy so completely he withdrew to recuperate in a way no human did. And so life went on until the day baby bipolar was born. All celebrated the child who grew to be like his mom and his dad, mostly human featured but with that wonderful periods of energy, productivity, vitality, and as with his father, the recuperative period always followed. Unlike his father, though, baby bipolar was a stud.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was Neanderthal Bob. He wooed sweet little Lucy human with his energetic guile and charms way pre-BC. He sealed the deal one fine spring day by luring the Woolly Mammoth off the cliff single handedly. He was accepted by the tribe, which of course was a bit unusual for humans to let one of their own wed a Neanderthal seeing as how there was a lot of discrimination back then, but that is what they did. Over time they came to accept that Bob had most useful periods of invincibility but that they eventually depleted his energy so completely he withdrew to recuperate in a way no human did. And so life went on until the day baby bipolar was born. All celebrated the child who grew to be like his mom and his dad, mostly human featured but with that wonderful periods of energy, productivity, vitality, and as with his father, the recuperative period always followed. Unlike his father, though, baby bipolar was a stud.

oh THAT MAKES TOTAL SENSE THANK YOU SO MUCH NO ONE EXPLAINED IT LIKE THAT TO ME BEFORE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

UC Irvine researchers found the allele (7R) that codes for ADHD. I talked to one of the authors of the paper in Nature and he said they're jonesing to do research on BP but there's no funding available. ADHD is more controversial so they were able to shanghai funding for the research.

Mutations aren't always random, but they do occur when an organism adapts to ecological pressure. BP has two general components that have been expressed in the human gene pool as two adaptive strategies: hunker down and get outta dodge via superhuman means. Somewhere way back when, these two adaptations were good strategies and got passed down as the survivors of pressures, stresses and disasters developed/used them (unconsciously) and got to do the naughty dance and thus breed. Over long periods of time those little mutations build up and by the time we roll 'round, we get too much of those very old good things. Yay us.

I read a paper in Nature five or six years ago that documented definite genetic histories with BP. It didn't break BP down by type or anything but the statistical variation was such that any reasonable scientific mind would say, BP is definitely genetic or, has a genetic component.

The outdated view that MI (or at least BP) is random and some lurking demon under the rug waiting to strike without warning needs to die. It's not random, there are patterns to most of this shit. It feels like it can be a random demon, blah blabbity blah but that's not science that's feelings.

Psycheducation.org is a really really helpful website when it comes to explaining BP and the genetic component. Nature is expensive but libraries carry it mostly and it's a kick ass science journal (savored best on obsessive days).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...