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An Adult ASD Diagnosis Gets You What?


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I know very little about ASD, so I hope no one takes offense to these fairly straightforward questions.

1. What is the treatment for adult ASD?

2. Why is the diagnosis important? (to get treatment, peace of mind, whatever)

3. Do you have a formal diagnosis? Does a family member or close friend? Do you suspect adult ASD?

Most diagnoses in DSM get you drugs or therapy or both. It occurred to me that I have no idea what treatment is for adult ASD. The answer to the first question will probably lead to more questions (I really know very little), but we'll see if the first two cover most of it. The third question is just general curiosity since perspectives may vary depending on the perch.

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1. What is the treatment for adult ASD?

Some medications, specifically one that comes to mind is risperdal, can help with sensitivities to noise,etc. for some people. CBT can help with approaches to situations that are often encountered- new places, people and to learn coping mechanisms for dealing with anxieties that come with these situations and what to do. There are different social skills, like situational skills that can be learned to help know what to do in social situations better and some sort of role-playing can help too, though I don't know how much that is used in adult situations.

2. Why is the diagnosis important? (to get treatment, peace of mind, whatever)

For some, insurance reasons. For others, peace of mind- knowing that there is something to call the differences, difficulties, issues that are apparant. For others, accomodations in school or at work. Treatment approaches. Finding other people like themselves, such as in aspie or autie associations.

3. Do you have a formal diagnosis? Does a family member or close friend? Do you suspect adult ASD?

yes. a couple that state Asperger's and then, I think, the last neuropsych exam which explored this stated something like "HFA or PDDNOS [but there's no real reason to change the diagnosis]". I mean, it said it in more clinical terms, but not much more.

Most diagnoses in DSM get you drugs or therapy or both. It occurred to me that I have no idea what treatment is for adult ASD. The answer to the first question will probably lead to more questions (I really know very little), but we'll see if the first two cover most of it. The third question is just general curiosity since perspectives may vary depending on the perch.

I'm just basing this on the various things I've read in the past, I haven't been reading a lot very recently, but I know that both risperdal and abilify have helped me with sensitivity to noise and irritability related to shit like that, having a routine helps, being able to know what is going to happen helps. ["change is bad"] Exploring and questioning social situations and motivations is helping, but I could really use more focus on that in therapy, to be honest and would LOVE to have a skills book or something. I would also like to find an aspie group or something but I'm nervous about it. Having small classes and being able to sit in the same seat every day and small things like that helps.

Uh. sorry. Maybe that's too much info.

sorry if it is. I don't know.

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1. What is the treatment for adult ASD?

Nothing much specific to the ASD, medically, but it can give pointers to likely issues for investigation such as light/sound/food sensitivities which may benefit from active treatments and interventions. It gives a "heads up", basically. Apart from anything else knowing it is there *should* help professionals better communicate over any other conditions or needs that arise.

2. Why is the diagnosis important? (to get treatment, peace of mind, whatever)

To get insight, mainly. It "adds tools to the tool kit", and can explain why some ideas, approaches, activities are very much like banging your head aganst a brick wall.

It can make a difference in some circumstances to benefit applications etc. (UK)

To me the world stil doesn't make much sense, but I've got a much better idea why it doesn't make sense.

3. Do you have a formal diagnosis? Does a family member or close friend? Do you suspect adult ASD?

Yes. I was diagnosed by a member of Simon Baron Cohen' s team at Cambridge, five years ago at the age of 48.

"Solidly Asperger's " was the unofficial summary of a ten-page report.

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1. There is really no treatment for any kind of ASD, in adults or children. There are behavior modification therapies but they don't treat the autism. They just make it easier for the individual autistic child to fit in with the world.

There ARE treatments for things that come along with autism, however. Sensory integration issues and obsessive compulsive behaviors that aren't OCD come to mind. ADD and tic disorders are commonly in cohorts with ASDs.

2. It's important for two reasons. One, it helps with treatment. Obsessive compulsive behaiviors that go along with Asperger's tend to respond better to APs while OCD responds better to SSRIs. We're still figuring out which mine are. Knowing and individual has an ASD puts their obsessive and compulsive tendencies in a new light, however.

It also explains why I've gotten so little out of therapy every time I've tried it. I think a therapist really has to be autism aware to understand the how the emotional needs of someone with autism differ from a NT.

Two, it helps me explain my personal narrative. It helps me look back in the past and explain various social mishaps that I didn't understand. See how it runs in my family it helps my understand my family dynamics and my relationships with my family members better. It helps me understand myself.

3. I've never had a "formal" diagnosis but my pdoc and I have been talking about it for years and he agreed with me that it was a likely thing. He's a neuro-psychiatrist who specializes in ADD so he sees a lot of kids with developmental disorders as well so I think he's a pretty good one to judge. If you look at my whole family it's kinda obvious. I just got back in touch with a half-sister I've not talked to in years and she says she's pretty sure both she and her kid could get Autism spectrum diagnoses if they wanted to.

I didn't really seek out a diagnosis. I just noticed this last appointment that it had been put down on the form that my pdoc gives me at the end of each appointment for the first time. I wasn't surprised or shocked or anything. I just thought it was interesting.

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i dont know why i do but i feel offended. there are treatments for ASD as luna described. and the diagnosis is for one, insurance pirposes so i can receive certain therapies. and for two, so i know what and why i am the way i am. as well as being able to understand myself. and why i do the things i do. and why i react the way i react. and no i am not formally diagnosed. but i have been diagnosed by ever psychiatrist and therapits i ever had. and no, i do not suspect "adult ASD" i suspect ASD, from child to now.

I'm sorry if I worded something poorly. Offending was not my intent.

I also hope you are not saying that it's offensive for anyone to inquire. This board has that history. I think it's done everyone a disservice.

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And as somebody pointed out, there's no such thing as "adult autism." That sorta goes against the whole point of a developmental disorder.

Thanks for the clarification on this and info in general. I'm learning. I heard this term somewhere, and thought it was legit. Heh, it makes no sense now that I think about it. Engage brain, Stacia, it is still possible.

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Was it the inquiry itself that was offensive?

yeah pretty much. im not sure why though. stacia was just getting some things checked out. although it kind of felt like a chellenge, or an attack. just being uber.. weird or stupid or whatever i guess.

Sorry. Wasn't meant that way. I know little and just wanted to know a little more. ASD is very different from mood disorders, schiz, PDs, etc, which I know more about.

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Was it the inquiry itself that was offensive?

yeah pretty much. im not sure why though. stacia was just getting some things checked out. although it kind of felt like a chellenge, or an attack. just being uber.. weird or stupid or whatever i guess.

Sorry. Wasn't meant that way. I know little and just wanted to know a little more. ASD is very different from mood disorders, schiz, PDs, etc, which I know more about.

which i understand. and im sorry i took it the wrong way. but i cant help but feel attatcked when someone asks me this question. people like to challenge this idea all the time. and not for personal edication purposes. my first impression with this post is that you were trying to make a point. again... me being uber whatever.

Heh. I don't work that way. If I want to know something, I ask. If I have an opinion, I usually just give it.

Misunderstandings happen all the time. All that matters is that people listen long enough to understand what was really meant.

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1. What is the treatment for adult ASD?

Some medications, specifically one that comes to mind is risperdal, can help with sensitivities to noise,etc. for some people. CBT can help with approaches to situations that are often encountered- new places, people and to learn coping mechanisms for dealing with anxieties that come with these situations and what to do. There are different social skills, like situational skills that can be learned to help know what to do in social situations better and some sort of role-playing can help too, though I don't know how much that is used in adult situations.

Not much better than an anecdote, but I used to know an autistic guy (HFA or Asperger's Syndrome) who seemed to slowly pick up social skills through LARP/reenactment role-playing. It was very hard on him at times, but I guess it helps if most of the people around you have their own reasons to understand that a person doesn't need a rational reason to need a time out or shut down period Right Now.

There should be therapy available that does something similar in a more structured way, but I don't know for sure if it exists.

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Not much better than an anecdote, but I used to know an autistic guy (HFA or Asperger's Syndrome) who seemed to slowly pick up social skills through LARP/reenactment role-playing. It was very hard on him at times, but I guess it helps if most of the people around you have their own reasons to understand that a person doesn't need a rational reason to need a time out or shut down period Right Now.

There should be therapy available that does something similar in a more structured way, but I don't know for sure if it exists.

It does for children, but I don't know about adults at all. Useful stuff, though.

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Not much better than an anecdote, but I used to know an autistic guy (HFA or Asperger's Syndrome) who seemed to slowly pick up social skills through LARP/reenactment role-playing. It was very hard on him at times, but I guess it helps if most of the people around you have their own reasons to understand that a person doesn't need a rational reason to need a time out or shut down period Right Now.

There should be therapy available that does something similar in a more structured way, but I don't know for sure if it exists.

It does for children, but I don't know about adults at all. Useful stuff, though.

Yes, if handled well...

Done badly it really comes across as the tyranny of the majority: "You Vill Conform! Do it Our Way.. The Right Way! Or be Excluded for Ever!!!!"

(Whatever the weird illogical social convention is, without which these "normal " people will go off in a huff.)

I exaggerate: but not by an awful lot, sometimes.

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I used to know an autistic guy (HFA or Asperger's Syndrome) who seemed to slowly pick up social skills through LARP/reenactment role-playing.

My bf knows someone whose thesis (dissertation?) research is on using LARPing to help autistic kids learn social skills, and she's found that it does help. I believe she's in clinical psych, so it might very well work its way into the field at some point.

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I used to know an autistic guy (HFA or Asperger's Syndrome) who seemed to slowly pick up social skills through LARP/reenactment role-playing.

My bf knows someone whose thesis (dissertation?) research is on using LARPing to help autistic kids learn social skills, and she's found that it does help. I believe she's in clinical psych, so it might very well work its way into the field at some point.

I really needed both of these as a child, and got neither (not diagnosed till 48):

Advice, tips, and explanations of the social world in concepts and language *I* could understand,

(otherwise it's like trying to teach a foreign language by shouting at someone using it!)

and definite reassurance that "It's OK to be different."

(lack of that meant I grew up nearly always feeling *wrong* not to like the same things, think the same way, as most other people.)

Chris.

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