Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Recommended Posts

Okay to sum things up, I've decided I want to join the Royal Navy as a Nursing student instead of going to university and doing it. I'd like to do it through the RN. What're the chances I'll get in? I haven't discussed it with my doctor because she's an imbecile, but from my understanding she's going to stop my treatment in June because that means I'll be a year psychosis free. Will it stain my record and prevent me from joining up? I also have a history of an OD in September which wasn't a suicide attempt so it's not really an OD, OD. Just an accidental overdose. So what're my chances of actually getting in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I have heard about people from many different countries... unless they want everyone in, or are desperate, getting in with a mental health issue, especially a more complex one such as a psychotic disorder (compared to say, mild depression), is difficult. I am not in your country but where I am (Aus) a friend of mine got in, with difficulty (only just passed psych test) and he had experienced depression but not recently (about 5 years prior). I had also thought of doing my training through the defence forces but then decided not to. Some have a policy of not allowing those on vital medication to enlist. If you are in combat... can't stop to take drugs.

On the other hand, I guess the only way you'll know for sure is to try and find out! I hope it goes well for you. Perhaps if you call or visit an office and enquire before applying?

berry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Vapourware

Before joining the armed forces, you also have to think about how you would deal with highly stressful situations because you'd potentially be dealing with that on a daily basis. If your psychosis can be triggered by stress, then joining the armed forces is probably not the best option for you. You may also have to disclose that you have a mental condition before you can enlist and that may, or may not, preclude you from being able to join in the first place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's well established that the CAHMS service stops medication gradually after one year after a psychotic episode to see if it's cleared up. I've already been off....And yeah. I'm currently off medication. Not that they know. And I'm absolutely 100% fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MI + armed forces = A REALLY BAD idea.

~ May

It's not like the OP is talking about combat arms. I see little distinction between civilian and military nursing. It will be stressful and you will see your share of gore either way. If he isn't mentally qualified to handle a military career, he wouldn't be able to handle providing direct medical care for a living in any capacity.

That said, I'd hazard to guess that the odds are not in his favour with a history of psychosis, so the point may well be moot. And judging from his listed dx and history, I don't think this something that is just dissipate if he goes off meds. Seriously, I sympathize.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inspired_Neurosis on 06 February 2010 - 08:24 PM, said:

It's not like the OP is talking about combat arms. I see little distinction between civilian and military nursing. It will be stressful and you will see your share of gore either way. If he isn't mentally qualified to handle a military career, he wouldn't be able to handle providing direct medical care for a living in any capacity.

The military (at least in the U.S.) makes it hard to get in with any type of illness that requires regular medication, mostly because of the chance that you'll be somewhere you can't get it. I don't think you can sign up for the military and exclude yourself from the possibility of working in a war zone, even if you're not getting trained to man the machine guns. I have worked in Iraq so have seen first hand the difficulty of getting supplies in of basic things like food and fuel. I don't think you'd get in with diabetes that requires insulin, either.

I think the biggest difference between military and civilian nursing is the living conditions. A civilian nurse gets to go home at the end of the day, and a military nurse returns to quarters, which may be very uncomfortable and shared with twenty or thirty other people. There is a lot of stress associated with the military just by being on base, whether or not your base happens to be in the middle of a war zone.

But it's always worth a try - the worse they could do is say no, or discharge you later if things didn't go well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would advise strenuously against joining the military with a pre-existing MI.

If Basic Training doesn't break you, combat sure as hell will.

I was hoping mudpuppy would show up. Mudpuppy has recent military experience, including combat, so is by far and away the best source on this board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The military (at least in the U.S.) makes it hard to get in with any type of illness that requires regular medication, mostly because of the chance that you'll be somewhere you can't get it. I don't think you can sign up for the military and exclude yourself from the possibility of working in a war zone, even if you're not getting trained to man the machine guns. I have worked in Iraq so have seen first hand the difficulty of getting supplies in of basic things like food and fuel. I don't think you'd get in with diabetes that requires insulin, either.

I think the biggest difference between military and civilian nursing is the living conditions. A civilian nurse gets to go home at the end of the day, and a military nurse returns to quarters, which may be very uncomfortable and shared with twenty or thirty other people. There is a lot of stress associated with the military just by being on base, whether or not your base happens to be in the middle of a war zone.

But it's always worth a try - the worse they could do is say no, or discharge you later if things didn't go well.

Just wanted to say that you are correct regarding medication. You simply can't sign up if you require meds(be it for psych issues, diabetes, whatever), for the very reasons you cited. There is no ambiguity there. But the OP is apparently going off his meds. I'm not his pdoc, so I can't comment on that.

I also agree that there's no harm in applying and seeing what happens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I deleted the first one,

it was in poor taste,

even for me.

I read an article,

that specified bipolars

as not eligible for duty.

Don't know,when I was

wanting to get in,they

booted me for bad vision,

Would I tell them,

yeah,what about my

head meds.

I've been manic while

playing with my toys,

those big cartons of 5.56mm

went out fast,

and,Oh,the Horror,

I owned a 9mm, (my only)

which ate alot too.

I guess for the most part agree,

Would not like results of a crazy using a SAW.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The military and MI just don't mix. The stress is beyond what many NON-MI people can handle. It logically follows, then, that the stress is too great for a MI person.

The idea of entry-level training is to push people to their breaking point. Most people bounce back. Someone who has already suffered a bout of psychosis, is unlikely to do so. You may *never* recover from the level of stress-induced psychosis you are likely to experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MI + armed forces = A REALLY BAD idea.

~ May

It's not like the OP is talking about combat arms. I see little distinction between civilian and military nursing. It will be stressful and you will see your share of gore either way. If he isn't mentally qualified to handle a military career, he wouldn't be able to handle providing direct medical care for a living in any capacity.

That said, I'd hazard to guess that the odds are not in his favour with a history of psychosis, so the point may well be moot. And judging from his listed dx and history, I don't think this something that is just dissipate if he goes off meds. Seriously, I sympathize.

I kept my reply short because this post is obviously about military service in another country (besides my own), and I don't know if there are differences between the countries in what one might be subjected to. Either way, there are HUGE differences between combat nursing and civilian nursing.

Hell, in civilian nursing there are major differences just between what type of nursing you go into. There are nurses without MI who can't mentally handle certain environments. Example: being a nurse at a GP's office is going to give you a WAY different experience then being an ER nurse or a gerontological nurse or a pediatric nurse or an oncology nurse.

That said, nursing is a fantastic career choice. There's so many options in what kind of nursing you go into and it's a pretty stable field even in a bad economy. A decent nurse can almost always find a job somewhere.

Especially with having a history of a psychotic disorder, I hold that joining the military falls under the heading of "bad idea". I don't agree that applying and seeing what happens is the best way to judge the decision. There are a lot of things in life that we "could do". That doesn't mean that the decisions are mentally healthy.

I really urge the OP to look into other ways of getting the desired training.

~ May

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually have an entirely different view. I have a friend who is BP w/ Psychosis and is currently a practicing Nurse in the Army. She needed a waiver to go into the combat zone (Iraqi Freedom), but she got it and faired pretty well. You're not on the front lines, though you do get combat training. She stayed in a camp and patched up those coming back from combat.

I don't know about the initial sign-up or if her disorder was reveled then. If you'd like I could probably put you in contact with her so she could answer your questions.

But, yes, it is possible to join and be productive even with psychological problems.

Edit: Ah.. didn't catch that you're from the UK. The above is info for the US Army.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, it annoys me that, on a site like this, so many people are keen on insisting that everyone with a diagnosis is a useless fuck who should do clerical work at most, if getting out of bed in the morning isn't too stressful in the first place.

Mental illness is just so broad that the reactionary nay-saying without knowledge of the OP's condition pisses me off. Recruitment standards are relatively grey and individually tailored for a reason: this isn't "one size fits all" stuff.

Entities: apply, dude. Be receptive if they tell you that you can't serve and give you a reason why. But they will know a hell of a lot better than anyone on this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The US Army will *not* take anyone.

What a recruiter tells you is not necessarily true- you still have to go through a physical at the Military Entrance Processing Station.

We have members of CB who were turned away for ADHD, despite the fact that waivers for *that* condition exist.

There are no waivers for a psychotic disorder.

Mortars, snipers and IEDs don't distinguish between combat arms, and non-combat arms.

I wasn't combat arms.

I was blown up. Twice.

Mortars can fall anywhere in Iraq- and there are no "front lines" or "rear areas".

As far as I known, I'm the only combat vet posting on this thread, so please weight my advice a little more heavily- MI + the Military DON'T mix!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, it annoys me that, on a site like this, so many people are keen on insisting that everyone with a diagnosis is a useless fuck who should do clerical work at most, if getting out of bed in the morning isn't too stressful in the first place.

Where was that said?

Okay to sum things up, I've decided I want to join the Royal Navy as a Nursing student instead of going to university and doing it.

In terms of the actual question at the beginning of this thread - objectively to find out what your chances are, you should just speak to a recruiter. This thread has had responses from people in a variety of different countries and I'm not sure if anyone can really say what the chances are of getting in. There things can vary depending upon place and time.

For my own curiosity though, I have to ask. Entities, why did you make the decision that you want to pursue the Royal Navy instead of going to University?

~ May

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always considered joining the military it's the old cliché my uncle has, my grandfather has, his father et cetera. And all they have to say is it was brilliant. My Uncle became a teacher through the army, my grandfather seen the world. He went to Cyprus,Egypt,etc this was back in the 60's. He also spent 3 months in the brig for fighting with his Sergeant and that still hasn't deterred him from the Army, he says if he was my age he'd still join and do the exact same thing.

I want to join the forces because at the moment job security is paramount and in the UK all we hear is the NHS is dying this and it's dying that and 5000 nurses have been let go because they can't afford them and whatever. I would like the job security that exists within the forces, I'd also like the challenge and adventure. And last but not least, even though it will make me sound like a fool. I'd like to serve Her Majesty the Queen and work with all of her other forces and being a nurse helping those who have suffered from their devotion to the forces.

I'd also cut a year off my education meaning I don't have to go back to college in September, but that's just a bonus really.I don't want to follow every single other successful academic person and go to uni then get a job and carry on with the same thing for the rest of my life, the forces give me a bit of change. I've been given the number for the Royal Navy doctor, he works on Thursdays so I'll be giving him a quick buzz come Thursday.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have spoken to a Corporal from the QARANC, about my career options, he's one of the recruiters and I also asked him about my circumstances because he's medical. He says people are assessed on an individual basis in the British forces and it would be pointless to just exclude me now because there is a possibility I could join.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...