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Was emdr helpful?


Guest koward

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I've read up on emdr and now I am wondering if anyone here has benefited from it. At this point I can't bring myself to verbalize my experiences even tho my therapist is someone I trust. I can't seem to let let anyone that deep in my head. I don't think I could control myself.

If anyone has tried the emdr, how did you get the courage to open up and verbalize stuff that has been repressed and held internally for years or decades?

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I've read up on emdr and now I am wondering if anyone here has benefited from it. At this point I can't bring myself to verbalize my experiences even tho my therapist is someone I trust. I can't seem to let let anyone that deep in my head. I don't think I could control myself.

If anyone has tried the emdr, how did you get the courage to open up and verbalize stuff that has been repressed and held internally for years or decades?

It's really not scary. You go very slowly, and you can stop at any time. I felt so comfortable with my therapist, that I didn't ever tell her I had to stop. But you could easily do so. You are completely awake and completely in charge of what you share with hte therapist. Of course, it is most useful to you if you tell him/her whatever you are experiencing, but nobody is going to make you.

The GREAT thing about EMDR is that it can "fix" traumatic events in a relatively short period of time. MUCH less time that regular talk therapy. It almost seems like magic. I have also SEEN it work on sexually abused kids when I worked at a residential treatment center. They had had talk therapy forever, and nothing worked, until the therapy manager dude discovered EMDR. He was so impressed with its efficacy, that he got the entire therapy staff trained in doing EMDR.

Give it a go. You have nothing to lose, and you are ALWAYS in control. It's not like hypnosis. you are fully awake at all times.

Let us know how it goes.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've read up on emdr and now I am wondering if anyone here has benefited from it. At this point I can't bring myself to verbalize my experiences even tho my therapist is someone I trust. I can't seem to let let anyone that deep in my head. I don't think I could control myself.

If anyone has tried the emdr, how did you get the courage to open up and verbalize stuff that has been repressed and held internally for years or decades?

I started emdr about two weeks ago and I am a changed person already. I mean it. I found an incredible therapist who thought it would be useful for childhood issues (a series of traumas as opposed to one big event).

You asked how one gets the courage to open up. My courage came from an utter desperation to stop feeling so awful, to stop putting up walls around my husband and to stop feeling so tight all the time. My marriage was utterly falling apart and this was after years and years of trying so hard, seeing counselors, reading books and most recently taking antidepressants. My courage was nothing more than a desire to try anything that would work to help me to a better place. I have approached it with a desire to just get through it. You have to just get through it. Think of it like standing on a diving board and not wanting to jump in. Once you make the leap, there's no going back. Just make the leap because it could free you in so many ways.

It has been an amazing experience so far. After the first two sessions I had a feeling of elation that lasted for days and days. I was smiling more freely, I was sharing good feelings more easily and I had a feeling of hope and competence that I haven't experienced possibly ever. My third session was difficult and left me feeling deflated and a back to my old repressed self for a couple of days. (The therapist says your brain can process the feelings/thoughts from the sessions for up to three days afterwards.) Fortunately that didn't last for too long and the feelings of hope and competence returned.

Each time the therapist stopped to ask me where I was in terms of my thought process, I was at a different place. It was a definite progression from hurt and anger to realization and understanding, and with that a sense of peace. (At the end of my second session I had a huge smile on my face and actually raised my arms in the air with pure joy over how good I was feeling.) Only with my last session did I get a bit stuck at one point where I just didn't know what I was feeling and left feeling tired and a bit blue. But aside from that, each pause we took brought a progression in my relationship with the feelings I was having. Not sure if relationship is the right word, but I hope you get what I mean.

I cannot properly express the impact this has had on me in such a short time. My husband, who was literally ready to separate a few weeks back, is astonished at the difference. I am astonished at the difference. I am a very hard nut to crack, to say the least, and this has been a miracle for me. Without boring you, I always resorted to acting horribly because I never had the confidence in myself or anyone else to just talk about what was bothering me. I had no sense of emotional control and this has given me that control by sorting out my thoughts about where and why I lost control, never had it, etc. I can't say enough about it.

The previous reply is correct in that you don't have to share things if you don't want to. The therapist isn't supposed to do a lot of talking during the sessions. I do share where I am at each pause we take because it helps me to do so. My therapist encourages me to go with the thoughts that are leading me in the right place. You can take it at your pace. There is a freedom that comes with letting it out, though. If you trust your therapist it might be just the place for you to do it.

I would be happy to answer any specific questions, if you have any. I hope this has been helpful in some way. Best wishes to you!

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I'll add a slightly more cautious reply in favor. Just because I didn't see huge changes--but it helped. My less significant result may have also been because I was handling slightly less serious issues than many people (car accident that totalled the car and some family crap). But I found it helpful...it might be one of those situations where it's just worth a shot. I don't believe that it's known to cause any harm, so nothing lost if unhelpful.

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I had one session of EMDR and it was too intense for me. I had a rush of flashbacks that reduced my functioning for the next few weeks. After that my therapist taught me some more grounding and relaxation exercises and slowly talked through the memories without any of the eye movements.

I didn't get any magic results. It took a lot of work and a lot of pain but it was worth it in the end. Most of my PTSD symptoms are almost gone. As bad as all the medical trauma was as a child; I imagine severe childhood abuse and the like would take longer.

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I've had some good results with EMDR with clients who have PTSD or Acute Stress Disorder. It's a helluva lot more likely to work if employed within the first few days or months of the event(s). PTSD gets vastly harder to resolve the longer it takes to get treated. The process is all about dialing down the physiological upheaval paired with recall of the trauma. We're just not wired to forget events like these and you can make the argument that the survival of our species is more likely because of it. Except that active sufferers make lousy breeders.

Give it a try. And/or try a blog. Keeping traumatic memories locked between your ears only brings harm to you. Your flashbacks will not kill you. (But it sure as hell feels that way).

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  • 1 month later...

I didn't have much luck with EMDR. For one thing, my therapist, a so-called ''specialist,'' could not explain to me why it was supposed to work. She didn't seem to really have any idea about the theory or research behind it. This really bothered me. Then she kept starting and stopping and starting again. There were some extenuating circumstances--like a family death--that interrupted things, so I never received consistent treatment.

I do believe there is something to it, because it caused me to feel very strange afterward, as if I was drugged. I wouldn't drive for 1/2 hour following the sessions for fear of getting into a wreck. The thing is, I'm not convinced that ''something'' leads to improvement in PTSD. Certainly my symptoms did not change.

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While I have no experience with

EMDR,my Mother did the whole thing

What it was all about??

No idea,she did tell me it was a miracle,

recommended it to me,

I can't afford it,plus it's 100 miles away

Oregon or California.

I'll just live with internal conflict.

S

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  • 2 weeks later...

The two experiences I've had with EMDR have lead me to believe it's just not for me. I tend to get more dissociative instead of "together".

Acupuncture helps me much more.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A quickie answer: yes. I need more sessions at some point because I have 40+ years of shit to de-impactify. But the crap I did process worked wonders. Memories, yeah, still there but the punch of them, gone.

EMDR is good stuff.

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  • 4 weeks later...

i am currently still going through EMDR. It has been very helpful. . . . but also scary. Especially when your 'safe place' gets invaded by things not so good. The visualizations are very helpful for me, and the reprocessing of memories is going well so far. I would highly recommend it. There are even lists of nationally recognized EMDR doctors. ;)

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  • 2 months later...
Guest Juliana

EMDR:this is the ONLY therapy (method) that stopped 21 years of harming myself. Tried Yoga, journaling, talk therapy, ice cubes, Polarity, Reiki, Massage Therapy,etc. This is coming from a woman who had started self-harm at 17. Sure, it's emotionally draining, however, so VERY worth it....like coming out of a life-long veritable Catatonia. I suggest you research online & get a qualified counselor. Go for it & good luck!!

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