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Heredity and BP (possible triggers)


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Hi everyone. First, this is NOT a flame-bait, a criticism of psychiatry, or any other "stop taking your meds", Tom Cruiseish rant.

I just have serious questions.

I've thought a lot about the emotional instability that I experienced as a child, as a result of feeling that the world was absurd, unjust, and a place that seemed unfit for human beings.

Psychiatry might say that I had delusions of grandeur, some mania, some depression, and who knows what else. And psychiatry may be right. But what if the MDs are putting the cart before the horse?

What if what I perceived was absolutely true and real? The emotional instability I experienced was very real -- my family environment presented certain real challenges -- and I still DO believe that our world's societies are unjust, absurd, and so terribly inhumane.

Couldn't BP be an extreme reaction/revulsion to this situation? On the one (manic) hand, hoping that we can improve things and working VERY hard to change our lives and our immediate world for the better.... and on the other (depressive) hand, feeling despondent and exhausted from trying to make things better, and, looking at the results -- the chaos and suffering in the world -- and viewing all effort as pointless.

I suppose the question is: why is it US who ask ourselves these questions? Why is it US who look at the world and see not just a collection of people but a system of interactions that forces us to live in constant competition, aggression, defense, etc. ad infinitum?

Perhaps the "spark" that lights the fires of BP is just that. The "spark" is what makes us ask these questions, and then sets us down this difficult manic-depressive path; hoping against hope, and then giving in, and then hoping again, then giving in......

And that "spark" may be the hereditary part. That's where genetics come in. Might we genetically chosen to question the world's order, to make it better, and, unfortunately, to carry the burden of realizing the absurdity and injustice of the human condition?

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I don't think psychology seeks to redefine impulses to better the world as pathological, or denies the sorry state the world is in. Society and especially our hypomanically driven good 'ol USA applauds that sort of thing. exhibit A: our messianic quest to free the world. Our dispositions only become an issue when it affects our lives in acutely negative ways. For example, by destroying our relationships, careers, bank accounts, or by making us suicidal or too depressed to function. Our mania may or may not have gotten us in deep shit. But at the very least, it gives a clue about the type of treatment we need--mood stabilizer first and maybe an ad as an add-on for some. With our personal lives/chemistry in order so that we're not self-destructing, we should certainly continue to forge ahead with whatever ideals. Think of it this way: psychiatry is on your side by stabilizing you, enabling you to be that much more effective in changing the world! (And give non-bipolars a little credit for all their empathy, passion and efforts to save the world too!)

7

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What if what I perceived was absolutely true and real? The emotional instability I experienced was very real -- my family environment presented certain real challenges -- and I still DO believe that our world's societies are unjust, absurd, and so terribly inhumane.

Well, it seems to me that the world almost certainly is unjust, absurd, and inhumane. However, I think that if we really realized how absurd, pointless, and inhumane it was, we would kill ourselves much sooner and wouldn't be around to mend the problems that plague every human society and institution.

Couldn't BP be an extreme reaction/revulsion to this situation? On the one (manic) hand, hoping that we can improve things and working VERY hard to change our lives and our immediate world for the better.... and on the other (depressive) hand, feeling despondent and exhausted from trying to make things better, and, looking at the results -- the chaos and suffering in the world -- and viewing all effort as pointless.

I'm not sure about this. Maybe it's just me, but when I'm hypomanic, I'm pretty selfish and even when I go buying expensive gifts for people it's usually because I have some kind of selfish motives. In other words, I don't think that my mania does much to fix the world. I'm much more generous and idealistic when I'm stable, and I think I can do more for the world when my mood swings (whatever their etiology) are evened out a bit.

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So what you are really asking is  "Does a fish know it live in water?"  or  "Are we the only sane ones because we recognize the world is skewed?". 

No doubt we struggle through life with stuff that doesn't bother other people. Unfortunately, that it the point. 88.5% of people don't have problems answering the phone, taking out the trash or crying cause the sun went down one day and dancing on the ceiling the next because it came up.  They don't worry about all the things that could go wrong today or tomorrow. They just go out and live life and enjoy the good times and don't suppress themselves because they know the good times will end.

A.M.

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Hi everyone. First, this is NOT a flame-bait, a criticism of psychiatry, or any other "stop taking your meds", Tom Cruiseish rant.

I just have serious questions.

I've thought a lot about the emotional instability that I experienced as a child, as a result of feeling that the world was absurd, unjust, and a place that seemed unfit for human beings.

Psychiatry might say that I had delusions of grandeur, some mania, some depression, and who knows what else. And psychiatry may be right. But what if the MDs are putting the cart before the horse?

What if what I perceived was absolutely true and real? The emotional instability I experienced was very real -- my family environment presented certain real challenges -- and I still DO believe that our world's societies are unjust, absurd, and so terribly inhumane.

Couldn't BP be an extreme reaction/revulsion to this situation? On the one (manic) hand, hoping that we can improve things and working VERY hard to change our lives and our immediate world for the better.... and on the other (depressive) hand, feeling despondent and exhausted from trying to make things better, and, looking at the results -- the chaos and suffering in the world -- and viewing all effort as pointless.

I suppose the question is: why is it US who ask ourselves these questions? Why is it US who look at the world and see not just a collection of people but a system of interactions that forces us to live in constant competition, aggression, defense, etc. ad infinitum?

Perhaps the "spark" that lights the fires of BP is just that. The "spark" is what makes us ask these questions, and then sets us down this difficult manic-depressive path; hoping against hope, and then giving in, and then hoping again, then giving in......

And that "spark" may be the hereditary part. That's where genetics come in. Might we genetically chosen to question the world's order, to make it better, and, unfortunately, to carry the burden of realizing the absurdity and injustice of the human condition?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

frankly, there's just way too much epidemiological and neurobiological evidence against you. bipolar exists. it's not 'normal'. it's different, sure, but it tends to be more pathological than beneficial. that's why we take meds.

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They DO have that study that says that depressed people are the ones who have the most accurate portrayals of themselves. They tested on a survey how the person thought about themselves, and then gave that same test to their friends and acquantinces and found out that depressed people pretty accurately knew how other people felt about them...it was the "normal" people who had elevated ideas about themselves. *shrug* maybe we're the "normal" ones. Everybody else has delusions of grandeur.

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