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serge

Jobs that people with Bipolar are not suitable for?

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I was just recently diagnosed with BP2 after nearly killing myself in a mixed state. So now I'm on lamictal and am feeling so much better after a few weeks of hell while going thru the increasing dosage process.

Anyway, due to my extreme irritation and rage, I went bitch mode on my boss and decided to quit and find a job (the current job is only 4 mths old). So I sent out a couple of job applications and one of the companies replied and I'm scheduled for an interview next week!

Now, the thing is... I'm an IT professional... And the job that I applied for and have gotten a reply from is for a Marketing position. I was clearly out of my mind when I applied for it but the company who replied must be crazier. So now... Should I go for the interview? It's going to need alot of moving around, PR, campaign management and stuff. I'm interested in new responsibilities but I'm not sure if I'm considered stable enough to take on the unknown. I read that we should avoid stressful situations...

What should I do? Turn down the interview?

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Go to the interview. The worst thing that will happen is you won't get the job, but you will get interviewing practice. The best thing would be you get the job.

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Guest Vapourware

I agree with crtclms, just go to the interview and see what happens. Hopefully you'll get the job but it's never guaranteed, so don't think so far ahead.

As for BPers and jobs - I think it's wrong to put limits on yourself simply based on a label. You may need to adjust your work style and work/life balance now that you know what might trigger episodes, but it doesn't necessarily mean that you are now confined to certain tasks only.

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I was just recently diagnosed with BP2 after nearly killing myself in a mixed state. So now I'm on lamictal and am feeling so much better after a few weeks of hell while going thru the increasing dosage process.

Anyway, due to my extreme irritation and rage, I went bitch mode on my boss and decided to quit and find a job (the current job is only 4 mths old). So I sent out a couple of job applications and one of the companies replied and I'm scheduled for an interview next week!

What should I do? Turn down the interview?

Go to the interview. You could potentially be offered a totally different job. Meet everyone you possibly can. Don't limit yourself.

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Hey everyone, thanks for the advice! I guess I will just go down for the interview next week and see how it goes. Wish me luck!

(I'm really nervous now... omg what if I mess up?!)

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Hey everyone, thanks for the advice! I guess I will just go down for the interview next week and see how it goes. Wish me luck!

(I'm really nervous now... omg what if I mess up?!)

Go get 'em tiger!

Jobs that bp people are unsuitable for? The Navy said I was unsuitable as a sailor (after seventeen years) . . . tried the front counter at McD's (I was certainly unsuitable for that!); now I edit Romance novels. That seems pretty safe.

James

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Hi serge

I am with everyone else on this. The worst thing they can say is no...big deal.

Vapourware said it and I will second it. Don't think of your diagnosis as a barrier to anything. I have a job that is all multi-tasking, organization and deadlines...and I cope just fine (pre and post correct medication).

Never limit yourself until you find out for yourself that a job is not for you.

Good Luck!

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Good luck! I am nervous lately too, but everything will most likely turn out o.k. for both of us!

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Thanks a bunch for the encouragements! I'll be doing my homework to make sure I go for the interview prepared and I hope I don't chicken out at the last minute. I'll be increasing my lamotrigine dosage on Sunday and am very afraid that it might screw with my mood when Tuesday comes 'round the corner... should I stick to my current dose until after Tuesday?

Hey everyone, thanks for the advice! I guess I will just go down for the interview next week and see how it goes. Wish me luck!

(I'm really nervous now... omg what if I mess up?!)

Go get 'em tiger!

Jobs that bp people are unsuitable for? The Navy said I was unsuitable as a sailor (after seventeen years) . . . tried the front counter at McD's (I was certainly unsuitable for that!); now I edit Romance novels. That seems pretty safe.

James

Really, after 17yrs as a sailor they say you're unsuitable?? Well, at least you get to edit romance novels now, it sounds kinda interesting and its definitely safe, I guess. Are you editing it from home? Maybe I should go into free-lancing.

Hi serge

I am with everyone else on this. The worst thing they can say is no...big deal.

Vapourware said it and I will second it. Don't think of your diagnosis as a barrier to anything. I have a job that is all multi-tasking, organization and deadlines...and I cope just fine (pre and post correct medication).

Never limit yourself until you find out for yourself that a job is not for you.

Good Luck!

The good thing is, they won't be saying 'No' to my face, else I might just breakdown and cry or something.

But yeah, I guess I'm kinda over-identifying this thing... just worried since its a switch in industries. I'll be going from almost zero human interaction to hardcore human interaction.

But maybe marketing might just be my thing? haha, lets hope so.

You can always ask for accommodations under ADA.

nf

Unfortunately, there's no ADA here in my country. The minute you tick the box that asks if you've got MI, your job application is probably going straight into the trash.

Good luck! I am nervous lately too, but everything will most likely turn out o.k. for both of us!

Thanks! Yes, I'm sure everything will turn out ok for both of us smile.gif

(Wow, I just learned how to use the multi-quote thingy... amazing that I'm in IT despite my phobia for posting in forums)

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Serge, what country are you in?

Most countries have there own disability discrimination acts. I'm pretty sure the EU would have something as well.

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I'm with everyone else, don't limit yourself. I think it's good to be aware that you have an illness, but try not to dwell on it.

I have a fairly stressful job that is in the classic "fast-paced environment" which means my priorities are switched around often, I have to meet people and make presentations, and deal with senior management in a large corporation. I do well at it, and no one has a clue that I have an MI. I would never, ever tell anyone where I work because of past experience of losing a good job after I disclosed once, despite the disability protections.

I definitely wouldn't mention it in an interveiw, or when you're filling out the paperwork after you get hired. It's no one's business, and unless you're going for some kind of security clearance, you don't have to tell anyone.

The only limit I place on myself is to make sure I take good care of myself by keeping a regular sleep schedule, eating right, getting some fresh air and sunshine, and all that. But lots of people without MI do that, too, so it's nothing to raise any alarms. It sometimes means I leave work-related dinners or functions earlier than others so I don't stay out and party like some do, but that's no issue.

The only thing that I would be hesitant to do is to sign up for a lot of cross-time zone travel. Once in a while is okay, but there are people in my organization that jet across 6 or 8 timezones on a regular basis (monthly), and I know the sleep disruption would be bad for me. I would be hesitant to have a job where I changed shifts often, although I used to. I think night shift is hard for everyone, though, not just those with MI.

Good luck, I'm sure you'll do fine in your interview.

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Thank you so much for your replies! I'm from somewhere in Asia btw, so our policies are still kinda conservative. People with MI are mostly in the closet because of stigma.

Anyway, just got out from the interview. I think I might have screwed it... My thoughts were so disorganized I didn't really understand them myself. But I turned on "charming self" and got them to laugh at a few of my lame jokes... Basically kept the interview lively to cover my tracks. I'm not sure if I'm going to make it... ;) (they spotted a typo in my CV!!)

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I think only YOU know YOUR LIMITS.. And to be realistic, I know I have limits. I know I can (and have) run a marathon, but I know I can't (and won't try) to climb Everest.

But after over a dozen hospitalizations since being diagnosed, I can screw it up good when it comes to setting limits. The past four years I have avoided hospitalization precisely because I have the insight to know that certain jobs are bad news for me because of my condition, this does not equate with setting low standards, just avoiding certain traps, IMO.

--lluvia

Edited by lluvia_z

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I want to go to cooking school sooo bad, but the rational part of my brain tells me that I couldn't take the pressure (or the hours) of a kitchen more than a single day. And I'm not dropping $40k on a school unless I'm going to get a lot out of it besides satisfying home cooking.

I know I personally can't take a lot of pressure or a fast-paced job. I thought about becoming a massage therapist... That's quiet and slow paced. But the times and days off suck.

Maybe one day I'll figure out what I want to do when I grow up. I already have an IT degree that's pretty worthless now.

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Actually: there is one sort of job description you should look out for...

If the job requires you to work so much that you become sleep deprived, that can flip you into mania. You really need to be able to get a regular amount of sleep.

(A job I worked security for expected their managers to work 12-16 hour days, 7 days a week. One of their managers slipped a gear...I'm guessing he *might* have been undiagnosed bipolar...first he called in death threats to the vice president of operations{everyone was hoping he'd follow through...} then, a few nights later, he was up on the roof of the old facility, ripping off aerials...the police were called...the police helicopter started chasing him across the roof...he ran...and fell through a skylight...landed on a dryer...broke six ribs and only lived because the dryer broke his fall. In short, kids, sleep hygiene IS IMPORTANT.)

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Ok... now I'm seriously doubting my choice in the career change, but I just got a call and I've actually gotten the job. (I'm feeling conflicted about this)

About knowing my limits, I'm not very sure I do... I was just diagnosed last month and before that I've always thought that those homicidal, suicidal, depressed and zany periods were really just part of who I am. I thought I was just a big jerk or something, which would explain my lack of friends. So I haven't really grasped the whole watching for symptoms and what kind of stuff actually triggers me kinda thing. I'm keeping watch though, now that I'm feeling quite stable and like a brand new person, I guess I have a baseline for comparison and I've been sleeping early these days too (lamotrigine makes me sleepy anyway haha), so... *crosses fingers* I hope I manage.

Anyway, the new job is a contract position (and in public service too, so they have flexible timing), if things don't go well... I guess I can always go back to sitting in front of computers (if I can find another job that is). But hey, thanks a lot for all the advise ;) greatly appreciated!

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Guest Vapourware

Congrats on getting the job! Try and view the job in a neutral light and not let your doubts cloud you. As a contract position, I assume it's short-term? If it is, then even if you don't particularly like the job, it's not like you'll be stuck for too long. Or perhaps you will find that you like your career change, after all.

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Congrats on getting the job! Try and view the job in a neutral light and not let your doubts cloud you. As a contract position, I assume it's short-term? If it is, then even if you don't particularly like the job, it's not like you'll be stuck for too long. Or perhaps you will find that you like your career change, after all.

Thanks! I really want to try to not let my doubts cloud me... but its not exactly working... all those anxiety attacks are making me drained. And yes, the job is short-term, though not exactly that short, its like 2-years? Quite long if you ask me. I can't help thinking about the possibility of being fired or not doing well. I'll end up jobless... and my whole family will starve. Gosh, I need to stop thinking.

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Congratulations! I'm sure you'll do fine, don't worry, everyone is stressed out when starting a new job - there's always a lot to learn, lots of new faces, etc.

Since you're just recently diagnosed, I would suggest keeping a daily mood chart. I prefer a simple spreadsheet with dates on the bottom and a scale of 1 to 10 up the side, where 1 is suicidal, and 10 is the best day ever. Or you can go a bit swankier here:

Moodtracker

It's especially useful when you're changing meds, or changing circumstances as you are now with your new job. Some people keep a journal, but I never could seem to keep up with it, but I can mark an 'x' on a chart every day.

Also, it's really useful to take with you when you go to see your pdoc. It tells them at a glance how you've been doing, and it gives a more accurate picture of how you're doing. Otherwise it's too easy just to concentrate on the days immediately prior to the appointment, and miss the bigger picture.

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