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I still cant motivate to exercise


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I take my paxil and adderall but I still stray away from exercising. What does it take to get rolling?? I see people who have jogged for years but I cant stick with it.

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my suggestion would be to just go for a walk. if there a place that you like to run, go there and walk.

i know that for me exercising is a bunch of things that i have to overcome. thoughts of having to get ready, the anticipation of feeling in pain from breathing hard as i run, the parts of the trail that are harder to run. and all of this combines to kill any momentum i might have to go do it. motivation yes, but also that sense of momentum that comes from having a habit of doing it.

so maybe if you just went out and walked the running path, enjoyed the outdoor part of it, just got used to being out there for a part of each day. let it become part of your day. and maybe you could sometimes try running a little bit on the path. then maybe a bit more another time. so my suggestion is to try to build a time into your day where you go out and walk. try to get a habit going, then make it more physically productive by doing it running instead of walking.

grouse.

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Guest Guest_soulshards_*

I looked up the best-rated jogging shoes on consumer reports website. (normally $70, I found them for half price at the footwear store.)

I went out and bought them! Then I bought an MP3 player and loaded up every favourite song I own. ($100)

Yes it was expensive, but if you calculate how much I saved by not [paying-for-but-not-working out at] the overcrowded gym, it was worth it.

Getting dressed and out the door is still a willpower thing for me, but once I'm out there, I generally keep going.

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You are not alone.

I have the shoes, clothes, membership (it's a local gym, quite cheap), and the desire to be in shape/lose some weight.

But I still can't get out the door. Plenty of motivation, no ability to actually do any of it.

I think of this as an inertia problem -- it's much harder to change the state, but once I've changed (like actually gotten out the door) then I just keep going on that path until something makes the next change happen. The problem is that the first change away from sitting at my desk either online or working is so difficult that it can take days to build up.

Fiona

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I am not a runner, nor pretend to be - actually I hate it, its bad for your knees and back if you arent careful and my philosophy is that if you really want to get there fast - DRIVE!!!

Mind you  I am a great fan of good paced walks etc...  and I train for kickboxing several times a week (1hr plus sessions).

Maybe find a sport you enjoy - maybe field hockey?  you are running but it is start and stop so you can rest a bit too??  or maybe swimming - it puts no pressure on the joints, good for increasing lung capacity (good for asthmatics like me) and once you get fitter at that running/joggig/walking may be easier to handle?

Dunno, I am a lazy one so cant speak, but offering help.

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I don't get much of a rush until I'm a little bit in shape. That can take a while, maybe a month or two. Always got the best rush from running, but my knees and ankles don't seem to like it anymore.

I think it's important to pick an activity that's convenient and enjoyable. Choosing something which provides optimal conditioning, but which you can't make yourself do is not helpful. I find machines indoor take the most motivation. Sometimes I use my exercise bike indoors, but it's much more fun to go out and ride a real bike. If I get into road riding, I tend to spend a LOT more time exercising than if I do some boring workout. Bicycling is nice because it's cheap and I can do it from my house. You don't need to buy one of those fancy carbon things. A $20 thrift store special may be fine if you are mechanically inclined, or else a tuned up used bike from a private party you trust or a shop. Or find them at the dump, which is where my currently most popular ride comes from.

If you want to use an elliptical, put a big TV in front of it and turn on something exciting like a cheesy action movie. Or perhaps there's a TV show you always watch, and you could make it a habit to do the elliptical at the same time. Much easier that way. Or play fast tunes. Or learn to read while using the machine, tho this may not be easy at all at first. Also, set up a big fan to keep you cool. Tonight I went on a short ride on my real bike using a headlight, then came in and made a long phone call while pedalling my exercise bike. The odometer on my exercise bike says something like 14,500, but I've had it for 20 years. I've done maybe 1200 or 1300 miles on the road since April.

Another exercise trick is to do some social thing with a time commitment which involves exercise. Going to group rides makes me much more likely to actually pedal. Or join a tennis club or something. These things take more time, tho.

Walking, especially up and down hills, is pretty entertaining and certainly makes you feel good, even if it's not a super vigorous thing to do.

For people who have some dough, time, and a good back, sculling is an amazing activity. It's just a very pleasant thing to do, and you get a real sense of smooth speed. It's really maybe only a fast jog, but on the water that feels pretty damn fast. It's not necessary to buy one, there are clubs in urban areas.

When I was in college I was tired and short on sleep most of the time. The idea of doing anything vigorous, like running, seemed preposterous. However, I learned that after about 5 minutes I'd start to feel ok anyway. And it was the one time during my day when I didn't feel guilty. One day I had insomnia until sunrise. I gave up and went for a long run, maybe 6 or 8 miles. I got to see the sunrise and the Constitution (Old Ironsides) at the dock. A fond memory even now. And when I got back I was out like a light. Unfortunately I had to get up 3 or 4 hours later, but at least I slept some.

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Guest embankment

I don't get much of a rush until I'm a little bit in shape. That can take a while, maybe a month or two. Always got the best rush from running, but my knees and ankles don't seem to like it anymore.

I think it's important to pick an activity that's convenient and enjoyable. Choosing something which provides optimal conditioning, but which you can't make yourself do is not helpful. I find machines indoor take the most motivation. Sometimes I use my exercise bike indoors, but it's much more fun to go out and ride a real bike. If I get into road riding, I tend to spend a LOT more time exercising than if I do some boring workout. Bicycling is nice because it's cheap and I can do it from my house. You don't need to buy one of those fancy carbon things. A $20 thrift store special may be fine if you are mechanically inclined, or else a tuned up used bike from a private party you trust or a shop. Or find them at the dump, which is where my currently most popular ride comes from.

If you want to use an elliptical, put a big TV in front of it and turn on something exciting like a cheesy action movie. Or perhaps there's a TV show you always watch, and you could make it a habit to do the elliptical at the same time. Much easier that way. Or play fast tunes. Or learn to read while using the machine, tho this may not be easy at all at first. Also, set up a big fan to keep you cool. Tonight I went on a short ride on my real bike using a headlight, then came in and made a long phone call while pedalling my exercise bike. The odometer on my exercise bike says something like 14,500, but I've had it for 20 years. I've done maybe 1200 or 1300 miles on the road since April.

Another exercise trick is to do some social thing with a time commitment which involves exercise. Going to group rides makes me much more likely to actually pedal. Or join a tennis club or something. These things take more time, tho.

Walking, especially up and down hills, is pretty entertaining and certainly makes you feel good, even if it's not a super vigorous thing to do.

For people who have some dough, time, and a good back, sculling is an amazing activity. It's just a very pleasant thing to do, and you get a real sense of smooth speed. It's really maybe only a fast jog, but on the water that feels pretty damn fast. It's not necessary to buy one, there are clubs in urban areas.

When I was in college I was tired and short on sleep most of the time. The idea of doing anything vigorous, like running, seemed preposterous. However, I learned that after about 5 minutes I'd start to feel ok anyway. And it was the one time during my day when I didn't feel guilty. One day I had insomnia until sunrise. I gave up and went for a long run, maybe 6 or 8 miles. I got to see the sunrise and the Constitution (Old Ironsides) at the dock. A fond memory even now. And when I got back I was out like a light. Unfortunately I had to get up 3 or 4 hours later, but at least I slept some.

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Guest embankment

I take my paxil and adderall but I still stray away from exercising. What does it take to get rolling?? I see people who have jogged for years but I cant stick with it.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

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