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I'll be taking a plane from the US to Mexico, and back again. I plan to take the meds in their original bottles, so the Rx info is there. Is there anything else I need to do? I will be seeing pdoc before I leave, should I ask for a note? If so, I'm sure she'd prefer that I had something prepared so she could just read and sign - is there a "form" letter for this sort of thing? Anything else I should know about/be prepared for? I'm kinda worried about a TSA agent wanting to question me about my meds, but hopefully that's a needless worry.

TIA

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http://www.cbp.gov/x....xml#Medication

Medication

Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the medicines you will need, no more, no less. Narcotics and certain other drugs with a high potential for abuse - Rohypnol, GHB and Fen-Phen, to name a few - may not be brought into the United States, and there are severe penalties for trying to do so. If you need medicines that contain potentially addictive drugs or narcotics (e.g., some cough medicines, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, antidepressants or stimulants), do the following:

  • Declare all drugs, medicinals, and similar products to the appropriate CBP official;
  • Carry such substances in their original containers;
  • Carry only the quantity of such substances that a person with that condition (e.g., chronic pain) would normally carry for his/her personal use; and
  • Carry a prescription or written statement from your physician that the substances are being used under a doctor's supervision and that they are necessary for your physical well being while traveling.

U.S. residents entering the United States at international land borders who are carrying a validly obtained controlled substance (other than narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or LSD), are subject to certain additional requirements. If a U.S. resident wants to bring in a controlled substance (other than narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or LSD) but does not have a prescription for the substance issued by a U.S.-licensed practitioner (e.g., physician, dentist, etc.) who is registered with, and authorized by, the Drug Enforcement Administration to prescribe the medication, the individual may not import more than 50 dosage units of the medication into the United States. If the U.S. resident has a prescription for the controlled substance issued by a DEA registrant, more than 50 dosage units may be imported by that person, provided all other legal requirements are met.

Please note that only medications that can be legally prescribed in the United States may be imported for personal use. Be aware that possession of certain substances may also violate state laws. As a general rule, the FDA does not allow the importation of prescription drugs that were purchased outside the United States. Please see their Web site for information about the enforcement policy for personal use quantities.

Warning: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits the importation, by mail or in person, of fraudulent prescription and nonprescription drugs and medical devices. These include unorthodox “cures” for such medical conditions as cancer, AIDS, arthritis or multiple sclerosis. Although such drugs or devices may be legal elsewhere, if the FDA has not approved them for use in the United States, they may not legally enter the country and will be confiscated, even if they were obtained under a foreign physician’s prescription.

Edited by mudpuppy
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I always have all my meds in a clear zipper-type bag in my carry-on bag, and I've never had them do anything other than glance at them. They've never read the labels or checked how many were in the bottles.

But I think Mudpuppy has given you good advice and I would be prepared with your letter.

olga

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I've done this countless times and without problems. Take them in the bottles and carry a copy of the rx from the doctor or if it was called in, a receipt from the pharmacy. Take what you need plus 3 or so extra in case of delays, etc. Put them in your carry on and so they can be clearly seen. They may look in the bottles and such--no biggie. This has only happened to me entering Asia. There is no form letter needed from your doc or anything, just the bottle with your name.

Enjoy your trip!!

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Carry a prescription or written statement from your physician that the substances are being used under a doctor's supervision and that they are necessary for your physical well being while traveling.

Would this be the same as the prescription label on the bottle? I assume yes, but thought I'd put the question out there.

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Customs/Border Control wants an actual letter from the prescribing doctor, I *think* for those medications which do not bear a prescription on them. Like OTC meds, or meds being carried apart from their original bottle to avoid loss of an entire month's worth of stims, for example.

I don't think it matters for travel inside the US. Just border crossings and overseas travel.

Edited by mudpuppy
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I also have never run into any problems traveling with meds. I just keep them in the original pharmacy bottle with the prescription info label on it and put all the bottles in a bag that I carry with me (much easier to keep track of your carry-on bag than to have them send your checked luggage to the wrong continent and be stuck without your meds for a while). I haven't even had trouble with controlled substances, but I haven't gone anywhere more exotic than Canada with those, so I don't know how other foreign countries or US border crossings are about things like that. It obviously doesn't hurt to be prepared ahead of time, but it seems pretty unusual for it to actually come up as an issue.

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I've traveled worldwide with meds, including narcotics (vicodin), and never had any trouble in other countries, or returning to the U.S. Just keep them in the original bottles and you should be fine. I would take more than you plan to need because you never know if you're going to be delayed.

If you plan on going for an extended visit, you'll need to get your doc to write a prescription for a year's supply (or however long you'll be gone) and get it filled before you leave, which will also require authorization from your insurance. U.S. prescriptions are only valid in the U.S. so you either have to bring your meds with you (my first choice) or find a local doctor (something I've never had to do and hope I never have to).

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