Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

AD SYMPTOM RELIEF VS REMISSION


Recommended Posts

I was just reading about depression and had some general questions. I'm on Lexapro. Evidently AD's treat the symptoms which make a person feel better over time. ADs are not a cure. They talk about remission. How does one know the difference bettween the AD effect and remission. Is there a dramatic effect that would be noticable as a uplifting emotional feeling once in remission.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boyd:

- You should not be making med changes based on what your friends say.  Or even what I say. If the doc prescribed 10mg and you are only taking 5mg, you need to tell him that and discuss it before changing again.

- Remission would be the complete cessation of all illness symptoms for an extended period (without meds).  Almost no one who has had an MI condition severe enough to require serious medications gets this gift

- Symptom Relief would be the temporary easing of symptoms with medications (this is the state of the art)

- Cure?  There are no cures for MI right now.  If there was, the discoverer would win the Nobel Prize for Medicine, be a zillionaire and Pdocs would be out of business. Your family doctor would dispense the cure.

-  AD Poop-out:  No, all AD's do not poop out.  Dr. Fred Goodwin says that it is probably not the AD that fails, rather that the depression gets worse.  His recommendation is to try upping the dosage before switching meds.  **But discuss it with your Pdoc first**.

- Life with MI is not a smooth level ride. Some days/weeks/months are better or worse than others. You need to be seeing a Pdoc and therapist on a regular basis.  They can help alleviate your fears and sort out symptoms and give you a feedback on what is real or just worries.

Be well,

A.M.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Llamanator

You could have a trigger. You could have a reactive episode.

It could just come out of nowhere and bite you in the ass when you least expect it.

It's unpredictible.

It's your choice whether you're going to let fear of some stigma interfere with your care, honestly. Can't stop you from that. I can tell you that I think MI is unpredictible, and you never know. Especially if it was ever *serious.*

*bites tounge*

Mimi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[Re-entered after a CB black-out]  A.M.

Thanks, but I'm THE MAN.  That's a nice tomcat on the side. ;)

- Hey, you are unhappy because you feel better?  I know, "I'm so happy I could kill myself"...BP. Or, to quote Gordon Lightfoot, "Sometimes I think it's a shame, when I get feeling better, when I'm feeling no pain".  "Sundown" circa 1976

- No, I don't think your brain needs a reason to feel worse or better.  Sh*t happens.  Especially to BP'ers.  Our brains have screwed up clocks and rythms that drift and coincidentally, can be made worse by stress, lack of sleep, mood altering chemicals, etc.

- Regarding Pdocs and stigma:  My Pdoc told me on the first visit (to which I tried to slink unobtrusively into the building) "I can't do anything about the stigma, what else is bothering you?".    Not a real fuzzy empathic response, but the truth.  We are crazy, get over it and get better.   

p.s.  Now when I go to her office I imagine that I am going to the land surveyors office on the other floor, act confident, and no one can tell I'm a pathetic unemployed looney.

Check out Dr. Phelps website.  He is a Pdoc who is a real square shooter.  Good medicine, good science and he has a hopeful outlook.

http://www.psycheducation.org/index.html

Cheers,

A.M.   

p.s.  Go outside this afternoon instead of trading emails with me.  I'm gonna work on the car. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to see a Pdoc but my wife is on my ass about that. She feel's all they do is blame your Mother or Father. I guess at this point it maybe best to wait and see how long I can stay at this level. Thanks for those sites, I love reading that stuff.- BOYD

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Of course, the notion that things are all your parents' fault is a psychological school of thought that isn't very common right now.

More to the point, most pdoc's don't do therapy anymore, they prescribe and monitor medication -- only they know a lot more about psych meds than your family doctor does.

And, the combination of meds and therapy is the most effective treatment for depression.

Fiona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah Boyd,

The stereotype Freudian psychoanalytic was on the ropes by the early 80's.  Oedipal complexes and penis envy didn't hold much water as prime causes once the modern drugs started flooding in, proving that insanity was a chemical mental illness of the brain, not an emotional state.  Also the pscyhoanalytic process wasn't terrribly effective, taking years of weekly sessions, and very expensive.

Like everything else in our society results matter, and money is a factor. The 70's saw the blossoming of behavioral modification and a focus on dealing with a patient's fears and concerns of today, and developing plans and behaviors for looking forward and being successful.  Dwelling on past history is not considered helpful unless there is a truly traumatic experience that still has hold of the person.

So, today you can expect to see a Pdoc for a few hour long sessions to get acquainted and diagnosed, start meds, followed by short sessions (15-20 minutes) at weekly to monthly periods for status checks and med adjustments.  Most Pdocs will require you to also see a pscyhologist or social worker for talk therapy. Those sessions are typically hour long and weekly to monthly. Again, the focus will be on talking about your concerns, allaying fears and dealing with them. 

I've generalized on the talk therapy.  There are many different approaches and you should choose one that has an approach that fits your needs.

I'm done.  Bagel time.

A.M.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

- Remission would be the complete cessation of all illness symptoms for an extended period (without meds).  Almost no one who has had an MI condition severe enough to require serious medications gets this gift

One minor correction - DSM IV defines full remission of major depression as the absence of symptoms for at least two months; the code number is 296.36.  Whether or not you are on medication doesn't enter into the equation.  I became familar with all the coded states of full and partial remission due to some employment/disability insurance issues that had arisen.

Please don't let the stigma associated with visiting any sort of head doctor keep you from gettting the treatment you need.  Pdocs are far superior to GPs in their area of expertise, and as everyone has stated, they'll want to make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe the meds you need to get your brain working correctly again.  They won't be looking to assign any sort of blame to anyone, because it doesn't really exist. 

If your wife is really having trouble with the concept, it might be worthwhile to show her some of the photos from the Crazy Meds site of the brain scans of depressed vs. non-depressed people.  It makes it clear that there really is a physical basis for what's wrong.  The stigma is only as big as you allow it to be, and no one needs to know that you visit a doctor or take any type of medication.

I'm lucky to have had some pretty long periods of full remission, and how I know is that I feel my old self.  I'm interested in things again, I have a reasonable amount of energy, I don't feel overcome with tremendous waves of sadness and grief for no apparent reason, I think that suicide is totally nutty idea and can't imagine that I even remotely contemplated ending my own life, and I want to get up and get dressed every day and see people and do things.  It's hard to imagine remission when I'm depressed, and hard to imagine depression when I'm in remisssion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...