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AnneMarie

Where do people learn to spell Bipolar as two words?

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I'm glad I'm not the only one. laugh.gif My big one is "per se" being misspelled.

I guess some people just...spell things phonetically instead of looking them up. Which, when you think about something like bipolar or any other illness, is kind of worrying. I know that when a dx was first suggested to me, I did research. I like to know as much about my own illness as possible...including how to properly spell it so I don't look like an idiot.

...also this whole discussion about the South being a strange country baffles me, but I grew up in the deep south and have never been north of Georgia. Northerners live in a strange, alien world to me.

I grew up in Alabama, and I'm back here at the moment. I hate, hate, hate, it, more than words can say.

:-{

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I do have to say I am one of those who cringes at some of the incorrect spellings...That doesn't mean I don't have the urge to misspell things intentionally just because it bugs people like me. :devlish:

Also whoever invented spell check deserves a medal...That is probably the biggest thing that keeps me readable as I can't spell worth a darn on my own. 

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It's a frozen wasteland. Tundra to the horizon with reindeer and lobsters wandering all over. And salt water taffy. That's all we eat. That and lobsters. Lobster taffy.

When my brother was moving up here (NH), he asked how long the snowy season is, and I had him going for about 15 minutes, telling him, "Oh, it starts getting down into the teens in September, the snow usually starts right after, and we get our last big storm in late May or so..."

It's December, and it's 37 today-- practically shorts weather!

OMG, this literally made me laugh out loud. I think I startled the cat. Because it's a pretty perfect description of winter in central NY too. The part about how long the snow season is, is just barely an exaggeration...it often snows by Halloween, and we've had snow as late as Mother's Day. And all we eat is lobsters, salt water taffy, and lobster taffy. And caribou. And, because this is Syracuse, salt potatoes.

As for the spelling deal - yeah, bugs me too. There are right and wrong ways to spell things. It's really not negotiable. Which isn't to say I don't forgive people a mistake - I make mistakes too. But it should be pretty obvious, from all over this site, how to spell bipolar. Which really isn't a difficult word.

But - just to throw one more thing in here - I really prefer the term manic-depressive. It's so much less clinical and so much more expressive of what we (I, anyway) actually experience. Opinions?

I could not agree more. Manic Depressive Illness should be what it is called. I even made that suggestion on the DSMV input website. I get manic. I get depressed. I get manic and depressed at the same time. Manic Depressive Illness. Yes, descriptive. Very. But instead we have some warped compromise to political correctness. Bipolar. Are we talking about diodes? The equitorial poles? I don't have two poles literally or figurative. I think bipolar is a stupid name, but just the same, I think it should be spelled correctly. :)

Edited by Stacia

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Northerners live in a strange, alien world to me.

It's a frozen wasteland. Tundra to the horizon with reindeer and lobsters wandering all over. And salt water taffy. That's all we eat. That and lobsters. Lobster taffy.

When my brother was moving up here (NH), he asked how long the snowy season is, and I had him going for about 15 minutes, telling him, "Oh, it starts getting down into the teens in September, the snow usually starts right after, and we get our last big storm in late May or so..."

It's December, and it's 37 today-- practically shorts weather! I do miss the south, though-- I love love love just lying around on hot days.

I love Jim Carrey's take of Canada:

"Wow! Canada. Must have been cold!"

"Yes. Ca-na-da. It was a frozen, hostile, wasteland. And there was much work to be done, if we were to survive the elements. After boring a hole through the ice, to find food, my good friend Nantuck and I would build an igloo. To protect ourselves. From polar bears, and flying hockey pucks. Then we would drink a lot of beer, and when Nantuck was ready, he would tell me the story of a great moose, who said to the squirrel 'Hey rocky, watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat!'"

I could not agree more. Manic Depressive Illness should be what it is called. I even made that suggestion on the DSMV input website. I get manic. I get depressed. I get manic and depressed at the same time. Manic Depressive Illness. Yes, descriptive. Very. But instead we have some warped compromise to political correctness. Bipolar. Are we talking about diodes? The equitorial poles? I don't have two poles literally or figurative. I think bipolar is a stupid name, but just the same, I think it should be spelled correctly. :)

I don't think I've met a single person that prefers bipolar when manic-depressive is so.. expressive. I prefer manic-depressive, but then.. am I manic-depressive type II? Hypomanic-depressive? :P

Edited by nibblerd

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Nib, aren't dog sleds and slays the main modes of transportation up there?

I don't think I've met a single person that prefers bipolar when manic-depressive is so.. expressive. I prefer manic-depressive, but then.. am I manic-depressive type II? Hypomanic-depressive? :P

Sure, MDI-II. Of course, you have to use a hyphen with this type of font....

ETA:

On further reflection, Hypomanic Depressive Illness (HDI) would make more sense? Besides, the differences in depression types are not made by mere numbers. Let's have equality in disorder naming! But, to be on topic, at least a little, I have to add, anytime it's spelled HippOmanic Dep Ressive ilLness, I will be irritated.

Edited by Stacia

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I thought Bi-Polar meant "gay bears". Just ask a Psycho-Tic or someone with a Psycho-Sis..

Of course in Canada we use the metric system so your 32' is our zero and our 32' is your 90. It's yet another conspiracy. But as I said in another thread, we apparently wear shorts year round.

Learn to spell, peeple!!!

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Nib, aren't dog sleds and slays the main modes of transportation up there?

I don't think I've met a single person that prefers bipolar when manic-depressive is so.. expressive. I prefer manic-depressive, but then.. am I manic-depressive type II? Hypomanic-depressive? :P

Sure, MDI-II. Of course, you have to use a hyphen with this type of font....

ETA:

On further reflection, Hypomanic Depressive Illness (HDI) would make more sense? Besides, the differences in depression types are not made by mere numbers. Let's have equality in disorder naming! But, to be on topic, at least a little, I have to add, anytime it's spelled HippOmanic Dep Ressive ilLness, I will be irritated.

Why Illness? Major Depressive Disorder => Manic/Hypomanic Depressive Disorder (MDD/HDD). Oh. I see! Screw all these name changes, BPI/II it is :P

I thought Bi-Polar meant "gay bears". Just ask a Psycho-Tic or someone with a Psycho-Sis..

Of course in Canada we use the metric system so your 32' is our zero and our 32' is your 90. It's yet another conspiracy. But as I said in another thread, we apparently wear shorts year round.

Learn to spell, peeple!!!

Actually, their 32' is about 9.72 of our metres. (:

Edited by nibblerd

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Guest Recluse

But still, where is everyone learning to spell bipolar as two words? Or with a hyphen?

Just think about the way you say the word 'bipolar'. Bye-Polarh. Especially if you've got a regional drawl. If most of what a person knows about something is by word-of-mouth rather than reading, it's natural to just spell it how it sounds, and to the average person's ear, it can be misunderstood as two words. (It's still annoying as hell.)

As for the capitalizations, I've got nothing. I'm sure I've made that mistake too.

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But still, where is everyone learning to spell bipolar as two words? Or with a hyphen?

Just think about the way you say the word 'bipolar'. Bye-Polarh. Especially if you've got a regional drawl. If most of what a person knows about something is by word-of-mouth rather than reading, it's natural to just spell it how it sounds, and to the average person's ear, it can be misunderstood as two words. (It's still annoying as hell.)

As for the capitalizations, I've got nothing. I'm sure I've made that mistake too.

See. This is why people shouldn't talk Southern!

:P

ETA: just joshing with ya

Edited by Stacia

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And all we eat is lobsters, salt water taffy, and lobster taffy. And caribou. And, because this is Syracuse, salt potatoes.

Ayuh! I love me some lobster taffy caribous salt potato soup on a cold August night... (My fave year was blizzard in mid-September through to the last major storm the first week of May-- we had snow walls 12 feet high and it was so COOL!!!!!! And cold.)

But - just to throw one more thing in here - I really prefer the term manic-depressive. It's so much less clinical and so much more expressive of what we (I, anyway) actually experience. Opinions?

YES! Yes yes yes! I am so glad to see someone write that here! I've been trying to be super careful to write "bipolar disorder" on CB, because I have gotten so damned sick of people in the rest of the world correcting me when I say manic-depression. Seriously, people that do not have a mental illness, nor work in any sort of medical profession, pausing, looking concerned, and saying, "Oh, that's called bipolar disorder now." Nuh, uh. Rlly?

I totally agree that it is more descriptive, and anyway, it has a good mouth feel to me. I was super grateful to Kay Jamison for expressing her thoughts on the subject in An Unquiet Mind, because it validated what I had always felt. Also, it really bugs me when people say someone is "bipolar" because it just reduces someone to a diagnosis (and it *sounds wrong* to my ear)-- people seem less likely to say someone is a manic-depressive, and more likely to refer to that person as "someone with manic-depression." Or so it has seemed in my experience.

What really burns my biscuits is hearing "She's got the bipolah."

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Stacia, it's so not just you. I hate it too. A lot. Words have correct spellings. All words. Alternate spellings are incorrect. For instance, spelling bipolar with any additional spaces, hyphens, or capitalizations, is just incorrect. Personally, when I see repeated misspellings of an easy enough word, and one which can be found correctly spelled all over CB, well, I'll just say I'm not impressed.

Really? The plural of "bus" used to be "busses" when I was a kid, now it's "buses" Both are in the dictionary. But "buses" is listed as the "correct" form. To-morrow used to be the "correct" way of spelling "tomorrow" and don't get me started on spelling changes from old English through Middle, Modern and the English we use today. I could write a paper, actually, I have. ^_^

I spelled bipolar as bi-polar for years and years because that's how I read in a magazine. But I wasn't diagnosed with bipolar, I was diagnosed with manic-depression. Only we don't call it that now. How was I supposed to know how to spell it? I'd never seen it spelled before except once, and that's the spelling that stuck with me.

I figure as long as you know what people are talking about, it's good enough.

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How was I supposed to know how to spell it? I'd never seen it spelled before except once, and that's the spelling that stuck with me.

I figure as long as you know what people are talking about, it's good enough.

To this day I still call it peanut brickle. And it's a bald headed eagle, right?

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How was I supposed to know how to spell it? I'd never seen it spelled before except once, and that's the spelling that stuck with me.

I figure as long as you know what people are talking about, it's good enough.

To this day I still call it peanut brickle. And it's a bald headed eagle, right?

And Pluto is still my favourite planet AND cartoon dog.

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I spelled bipolar as bi-polar for years and years because that's how I read in a magazine. But I wasn't diagnosed with bipolar, I was diagnosed with manic-depression. Only we don't call it that now. How was I supposed to know how to spell it? I'd never seen it spelled before except once, and that's the spelling that stuck with me.

That makes sense. I was sort of expecting more answers like this, actually. Thanks for answering the question posed.

Edited by Stacia

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Thanks for answering the question posed.

Wait. There was a question? I thought you wanted to know about lobster taffy and punctuation.

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I am one of those people who just seems to understand spelling and grammar, it just comes naturally and i notice words that are out of place or sentences that don't make sense. Online sometimes i don't spell things write because I type so fast that sometimes the ends of my words get jumbled and I don't notice.

I had a friend in primary school who was the opposite - no matter how hard she tried she spelt most things wrong, even if she understood the meaning of the word and the sentence. I guess I got used to being patient with terrible spellers early.

I don't like ppl hu typ lik dis or pEoPle wHo TyPe LiKe ThIs. That is really annoying and if it takes me more work to read it I generally stop reading it. Most of the time though, as long as I can get the point, I don't really care. Unless its a group presentation at uni, and then I'll correct everyone's spelling mistakes.

I also type online like I talk in RL, so my grammar is often a bit out because of that - such as starting sentences with the wrong words and stuff. I also spell words the Australian way which is different to the American way.

Picking up minor spelling mistakes seems like splitting hairs.... but Bipolar is understandable because its often the topic and its written around here a lot. I used to think that Bipolar was a better name because it didn't have the same kind of stigma, it seemed that people hadn't worked out what it was. Its seems that they have now though, and the stigma is kind of the same.

isis.

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Thanks for answering the question posed.

Wait. There was a question? I thought you wanted to know about lobster taffy and punctuation.

Yes. Precisely. I'm glad you said it so well. I'm only interested in the topic and everything off topic, not necessarily in that order.

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The misspelling of bipolar has always bugged me too - but I can be anal about these things (others include the usual "your" vs "you're"), and wasn't sure if it bothered anyone else.

Manic Depressive Illness

My issue with this is not "manic depressive", it's the word "illness". To my mind (rightly or wrongly) this implies that there is a cure, and unless I missed the development of a single magic pill, this really isn't the case. I understand that it's all about interpretation and that words can have different connotations for different people, but while "disorder" is far from perfect, I prefer it to the alternative.

Edited by miab

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I don't think illness implies cure, because there are plenty of illnesses that are chronic or terminal without cure. But I agree that I prefer disorder too.

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