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AnneMarie

Where do people learn to spell Bipolar as two words?

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stacia: i didn't say anything about if most people think mania is a fun happy-time. i was referring to the opinion of whether hypomania [which spell-check suggests I write as two words, or a hyphenated word! i am aghast], and stuff should fall under the category of "mania" or if "mania" should just mean "true" mania [whatever the current definition of that is]. whoever changed the DSM in 1980 or whatever was apparently of the second opinion, therefore believing that "manic-depression" excludes forms of bipolar other than bipolar 1. it is that which i was agreeing with.

and to dedoubt: i didn't say your disorder was "poetic". i just meant, to my ears, "manic-depression" sounds poetic, whereas the condition it describes is certainly not. so i'm with you there. no need to pull your bootstraps. heheh. there's another term i don't understand. [perhaps because of my extreme youngness?]

oh by the way, when i was younger and even less knowledgeable [if that is even possible, lol] whenever i heard the term manic-depression [or manic-depressive], i interpreted "manic" as an adjective describing the depression. i was way confused.

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It's bipolar. Or Bipolar if starting a sentence.

Do not get me started on their, they're there...

I would have used the quotey thing to laugh about some of the other posts, but my monkey mind will not allow me to read the entry on how to use it.

It's -5 here (celsius people, not farenheit) and I am dreaming about the heat and humidity I complained of only a few short months ago. A Louisiana swamp sounds mighty fine right about now.

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It's bipolar. Or Bipolar if starting a sentence.

Do not get me started on their, they're there...

I would have used the quotey thing to laugh about some of the other posts, but my monkey mind will not allow me to read the entry on how to use it.

It's -5 here (celsius people, not farenheit) and I am dreaming about the heat and humidity I complained of only a few short months ago. A Louisiana swamp sounds mighty fine right about now.

Psst. Hit "multiquote" on any post you want to include, and then hit "add reply" at the bottom. Simple!

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stacia: i didn't say anything about if most people think mania is a fun happy-time. i was referring to the opinion of whether hypomania [which spell-check suggests I write as two words, or a hyphenated word! i am aghast], and stuff should fall under the category of "mania" or if "mania" should just mean "true" mania [whatever the current definition of that is]. whoever changed the DSM in 1980 or whatever was apparently of the second opinion, therefore believing that "manic-depression" excludes forms of bipolar other than bipolar 1. it is that which i was agreeing with.

I know you didn't say anything about people thinking mania is fun/happy/etc. I said that. I said that a large percent of people think just that. In fact, they usually either think that or psychokiller, lol. So, my point was that the general public often thinks hypomania is mania because I believe that is the case.

So, I'm confused. Are you saying that they changed the name to Bipolar because the manic-depression name excluded anything that didn't meet the English definition of those words? As in it was done because the DSM powers couldn't just change the criteria? Because, you know, they do that all the time. Besides, the line between Bipolar I and Bipolar II is incredibly blurry today as it was back then. In 68, they recognized hypomania as part of cyclothymia. In 80, they classed it as atypical bipolar, which could have just as easily been called atypical MDI. In 87, they dumped it under BPNOS.

This is what you had for "Bipolar II" in 1980 DSM III:

ATYPICAL AFFECTIVE DISORDERS

296.70 Atypical Bipolar Disorder

This is a residual category for individuals with manic features that cannot be classified as Bipolar Disorder or as Cyclothymic Disorder. For example, an individual who previously had a major depressive episode and now has an episode of illness with some manic features (hypomanic episode), but not of sufficient severity and duration to meet the criteria for a manic episode. Such cases have been referred to as "Bipolar II."

So, BPII didn't have it's own code in 1980. Seven years later when DSM III-revised came out, BPII still didn't have it's own code. BPII didn't get it's own code until 1994.

Manic depressive illness was changed to bipolar disorder for political correctness, to mitigate the stigma associated with the illness. That was the only reason for the name change.

Edited by Stacia

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Do not get me started on their, they're there...

Ah, geez lighten up! As long as you understand what's being said, then who the hell cares if someone misspells a fucking word now and then. It does not denote ignorance - most of the time it's someone in a hurry or someone who's meds are making their mind Swiss Cheese. Their, they're, and there - they all sound alike, right? People are posting these these things pretty quickly. They're not writing freaking dissertations over here so they're not overly concerned about whether or not they've got the correct "their, they're, or there" going on, or the right your and you're, or whatever else crawls up your ass and makes it twitch (this being the collective "your" not you - sabrina - specifically). They just want to have their say and move on. If the meaning isn't lost, what's the big deal?

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Ah, geez lighten up! As long as you understand what's being said, then who the hell cares if someone misspells a fucking word now and then. It does not denote ignorance - most of the time it's someone in a hurry or someone who's meds are making their mind Swiss Cheese. Their, they're, and there - they all sound alike, right? People are posting these these things pretty quickly. They're not writing freaking dissertations over here so they're not overly concerned about whether or not they've got the correct "their, they're, or there" going on, or the right your and you're, or whatever else crawls up your ass and makes it twitch (this being the collective "your" not you - sabrina - specifically). They just want to have their say and move on. If the meaning isn't lost, what's the big deal?

Despite my peeve about biplor being spelled correctly on this site, I agree with you. Spelling correctly isn't essential here.

I like words. I know lots of definitions. Spelling, however, has never been my strongest suit. I love spellcheck but don't always remember to check every post. It is the Internet. This I think makes me average.

Most homophones you learn in grade school. I had them down. This was easy. Same with others learned over time. Then came Lithium. On Lithium, I think out what I am saying right (which I just typed write) but later read that I typed out the wrong word (like now). This isn't something you can spellcheck away. It takes tedious rereading, and when you thought it out correctly, it takes a lot of will to read exactly what is on the page despite the thoughts being fresh in your mind. Not easy. Tegretol caused some problems, too, but Lithium is the big offender. I've gone on and off enough to know. On CB, it either amuses me or pisses me off when someone calls it out like I am too stupid to know the right way to spell the right word. That is here. At work, it is a problem. I have to reread even simple email a few times before I can send it out. My ego is almost okay with it, but it is a major pain in the ass. Lithium, however, does lots of good stuff for me mentally, so I put up with some cognitive side effects.

Edited by Stacia

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so one time i was talking to my friend who has bipolar 2 and i used the word "manic-depression" to describe what he has [which, btw, caused me to immediately feel like writing a poem, haha] and he said "NO manic-depression is synonymous with BIPOLAR 1 because they get MANIC. I have BIPOLAR 2 because I only get HYPOMANIC. so don't call me that." so this made sense to me, and he is generally right about everything, so i thought i had gotten schooled.

and i assumed today, that when the DSM-word-changers of 1980 were thinking about political-correctness, it also occurred to them that "manic-depression" implied you had to be fully manic to have it, that having some less severe variant of mania didn't count as the "manic" in "manic-depressive" when in fact it did. but now, you, Stacia, have informed me that political correctness was the only thing on these people's minds. ok so maybe they weren't thinking all that stuff that i said. i still agree with my friend that "manic-depressive" implies full-on mania. and i still dislike that term!

ps, if you say "the general public believes hypomania is mania", sure ok, i don't think i claimed to have any idea of what the general public thinks?

edit: lol you just called it "biplor" :]

Edited by allgetlost

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Eh, you can dislike the term all you want and nipick about spelling mistakes (oh my gosh a typo! What an error in her argument!), but I'm going to have to side with the other folks with a "bipolar"-ish disorder and say that I like "manic-depressive" better. It's more descriptive. Manic. Depressive. There you go, the extremes in two words. They don't necessarily mean that the person experiences both extremes, but hypomania is still kind of a flavor of mania, dude.

And anyhow, if "Manic-Depressive" doesn't cover hypomania and the whole other flavors of mania, how is "bipolar" any better? Poles are completely opposite things. So how is a disorder name that implies two opposite things better than another name that also implies two opposite things?

But what does it matter? Clearly your friend knows all. Where is he, so that I may partake of his knowledge and wisdom? SCREW COLLEGE! I'm going to learn from this guy.

Edited by loosewiring

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But you are making good points.

I hope you didn't stay with that clinician long. There never was a a seven nights no sleep criteria, just one for reduced need for sleep.

Did you know that in the 1968 DSM II addition, there were no "depressive disorders"? There was Manic-depressive illness, depressive type for depression of unexplained origin. There was Depressive neurosis if there was a cause for the depression. Cyclothymia included depression and hypomania, so it sounds like that's where BPII resided back then. And, there was no Bipolar Disorder. That last treat didn't come about until 1980 when DSM started to look more like today's.

Oh, I can make all the good points I want and still not change someone's mind. That's what I find frustrating. ---> "BUT I'M RIGHT!!!! ME! I'M THE RIGHT ONE!!!" ;)

OK, long, ranty semi-OT part (also may be :Trigger:):

That guy was a psychologist I saw for an emergency appointment. I found out later that not only had he just gotten his degree, but he had never dealt with an acutely suicidal patient before. So there I was, desperate to get help, and here was this doofus discounting everything I was saying. And being wrong about just about everything-- the seven day "criteria" may have been in place like a hundred years ago, but even in the crap state I was in, I knew he was wrong. He told me that what I really needed was to go directly into the hospital and get put on SSRIs-- which is such a good idea for someone that just came out of an acute manic period (THREE MONTHS worth). I told him that, though I wanted to kill myself, I was not going to do it for awhile, because the next week was my son's birthday, and I would never commit suicide at such a time. He told me that suicidal people don't plan like that. (Hey all of you out there that have gotten to that point-- there is usually lots of planning, am I right?) When I insisted that I had to go home to care for my children, he told me he would have to call the police to come get me and put me in the hospital. He put me into a horrible panic attack which sent me tail spinning further down (we literally had nobody to help care for the four kids, and my husband would get fired for not showing up to work). I finally convinced him that I would not kill myself until after my son's birthday. I signed that stupid little piece of paper so he could cover his ass (really, does anyone think that signing an agreement that a person won't commit suicide will actually work?) and got the fuck out of there. I saw another clinician the next week and got put on the right sorts of meds and didn't end up in the hospital for couple of months.

I was in such a horrible state after that meeting that we filed a complaint through our insurance company. And he went bye-bye. Which is good, because that is the place I have to go now that I am on Medicaid. (He freaked me out so much that I wouldn't go in for treatment at that place for over a year because I was scared to run into him.)

Thanks for all of the history of the DSM. I knew that it changed a lot with every edition, but I didn't know that depressive disorders weren't even in it in such recent times. Come on, DSM people, depression and manic depression were described millenia ago!

Edited by dedoubt

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ok guys. as much fun as it is to talk about words, and what they mean, and why we like some words better than other words, i think i'm gonna bow out here because i see this could go on for ages, and i grow weary of it.

i pointed out the typo because it was funny and i hoped to lighten the conversation. not to invalidate someone's argument.

nobody needs to change anybody else's mind so relax. we're talking opinions here. most people prefer the more descriptive term, i prefer the less descriptive one. basically because it's less descriptive and does not imply one certain symptom [mania] while actually referring to a whole category of symptoms [all types of mania]. and i think i feel like it's dramatic or whatever because the two symptoms do not need to be described explicitly in the term, because if you know what the word means, you already know that it involves mania and depression. therefore having them in the name of the disorder becomes superfluous, which i think is why the term strikes me as overly poetic.

my friend does not know all. he was wrong about this. i told you all that story to point out that he, like me, erroneously thought the "manic" in manic-depression meant that the condition required full-on mania, when it actually referred to all sorts of variations of mania. emphasizing the misleading-ness of it.

flounce!

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I'm fine with all you are saying, and yes, we all get opinions, and this thread is not apt to change minds. This is a rather nonsense thread, anyway. But, I do not get why you say it's right for the name bipolar to not describe the illness while it is fine for MDD to include the word "depression," an adjective, the word that describes the disorder. That is a double standard. You are free to hold it. But it still is an irrational argument.

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OK, to whom do I owe an apology? I apologize. I gave way to an urge to point out a homophone in a topic devoted, at least peripherally, to correct spelling. I found it ironic. Guilty as charged. I will try to lighten up. Forgive me. Sorry.

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OK, to whom do I owe an apology? I apologize. I gave way to an urge to point out a homophone in a topic devoted, at least peripherally, to correct spelling. I found it ironic. Guilty as charged. I will try to lighten up. Forgive me. Sorry.

I'm the one who made the error and it made me laugh. The comment was so appropriate to this thread, it couldn't have been better said. I commented later because I've made serious posts where totally off topic someone nit picks a homophone error instead of commenting on the topic at hand. That is different than what's gone on in this thread where proper spelling is on topic.

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My comment about their, there and they're was in jest - not specific to this board, but when you see it misused on signs and stuff it is just wrong.

I have developed some interesting dislexia-like symptoms thanks to my mood stabilizers so I am the last to get up in arms about it.

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My comment about their, there and they're was in jest - not specific to this board, but when you see it misused on signs and stuff it is just wrong.

I have developed some interesting dislexia-like symptoms thanks to my mood stabilizers so I am the last to get up in arms about it.

I agree about signs and stuff. I love misspelled signs, actually. They crack me up. I guess I am a snob at heart.

I made my comments here because some people on CB don't know anticonvulsants and Lithium can impair language to some degree.

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I'm fine with all you are saying, and yes, we all get opinions, and this thread is not apt to change minds. This is a rather nonsense thread, anyway. But, I do not get why you say it's right for the name bipolar to not describe the illness while it is fine for MDD to include the word "depression," an adjective, the word that describes the disorder. That is a double standard. You are free to hold it. But it still is an irrational argument.

I agree. As the late great Pat Moynihan said, you are entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts.

Actually, I'm enjoying this nonsense thread. It's been kind of fun.

And as far as Lamictal and lithium screwing with your head - yeah, absolutely. I even started a thread about it on the anticonvulsants forum, asking if my lithium-induced stupidity would ever go away. The replies were not encouraging. But the lithium's doing a lot of good things, so I'm putting up with it, at least for now. The Lamictal was already screwing with my ability to find the word I wanted - I frequently type something that's nearly-it-but-not-quite - and the lithium just seems to be making me more stupid than ever. It's frustrating, but what can you do? Not treat your mood-swingitis? :lol: Not an option.

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Don't forget Dopamax for creating really good stupids. yay!

Ah, the queen of the stupids! But the stoopids and typos are not the same as choosing to spell a word wrong because you like it better than way.

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Don't forget Dopamax for creating really good stupids. yay!

Ah, the queen of the stupids! But the stoopids and typos are not the same as choosing to spell a word wrong because you like it better than way.

Indeed.

Now I'll play Devil's advocate. English is a living language and as such words, the creation of words and definitions and even spellings change and morph over time. That's why it's still a living language. At least that's my limited knowledge of it.

Granted, as far as I know that's why medical professionals and scientists prefer latin so that all this living language hooha can be avoided. But I'm just a topadope so I can't write for certain.

BTW, it's bipolar. lol.

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I like bipolar better than manic depression, personally. I kind of agree that manic depression sounds melodramatic. Like, say, consumption, or the plague.

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