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Would see a pdoc who had sanctions against them?


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So I'm researching pdocs.

I'm thinking it's time to stop seeing the Psych Nurse I've been seeing for the past year, and find someone new.

In looking at HealthGrades, I found one who has great ratings, but also has a sanction against her. It's not punitive. It states, in part:

Nature of Complaint:

The Physician suffers from anxiety and mood disorders that were aggravated in March 2005 by a number of serious stressors in the Physician's life.

The symptoms have improved with treatment and the Physician is able to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety.

Part of me thinks, "cool, she'll understand 'cuz she's BEEN THERE man!" another part of me thinks "but what if her own problems surface at a time that I'm also in crisis, what then??"

Right now I'm just making a list of places to call tomorrow, but I'm curious what you all think, too.

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I would totally go to see someone with a successfully treated mood disorder! It would be a positive for me.

Any doctor can have sudden problems that might interfere with their ability to be there for you all the time. For example they might get physically sick themselves, have to take care of a child or sick relative, or have something else happen in life.

Also, I am sure that lots of doctors have mental health conditions that we just don't know about. The only difference here is that you know.

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I know this is a somewhat hypocritical and just generally kind of douchey response on my part, but there is just no way in hell I'd see a pdoc whose behavior had at some point been such tha she'd been professionally sanctioned, no matter what the cause. If she let things get that out of hand before, it's just that much more likely to happen again.

For a gp, or a dermatologist, or probably just about any other kind of doctor, I don't think I'd have the same reaction. But my pdoc's doings have more impact on my life than any other doctor's at this point. If she messes something up, with my meds, or whatever, it could take me months to get back on track. I'm just not interested in taking that chance.

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I have to say I would have NO CLUE on this one, other than doing a phone interview and asking her directly what happened.... The bottom line is, boards themselves can be kind of douchey, so i'd want to hear from her what the story was. If she were unwilling to say, that might be a problem, because anyone with a public sanction ought to be willing to talk about it (in an appropriate way). I mean, obviously, not gruesome details, but maybe "I had to take time of and x y z happened which led to sanction."

I don't know. This is a tough one.

Do you have other good options?

Anna

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Guest Vapourware

Personally, I would make a phone call and ask about the details of the sanction, and see how much detail she is willing to give. The event was in 2005 after all, you'd imagine she is okay and has developed better coping strategies after all this time.

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Well, I would go talk to her. Certainly anyone can have difficult life circumstances. And we, bipolar, are more vulnerable. The death of a parent, a divorce, illness/death of a spouse or child - these terrible 'stressors' could happen to anyone. And if you have a mood disorder it is just harder.

I would meet her. What did not work for me was a psychiatrist who was semi retired and traveled a lot and had NO ONE to cover for her. She was always in Peru or some fucking place when i would have a mixed episode. And my meds were not working. It was a nightmare and my poor husband went through a lot with this. But now, my current doc has someone on call for him. Or he responds to emails when out of town.

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I'm another douche. I'd pass. I don't care whether my pdoc has an MI. I just don't want there to be any reason for me to know about it. Part of being a responsible worker is knowing when to call in the backup team, whether that's due to flu or crazy. I pretty much feel the same about all my docs. My dentist, too. Tell me you are crazy, that's cool. Show me you're nuts, uncool, so uncool that I don't want you as my provider. I'm pretty forgiving of most professions, just not my health care providers.

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OK, now I feel naive. My assumption from reading the first post was that this person wasn't dx'd and treated until 2005... having seen friends surprised by their first manic episode before, I imagined the same here. But I see all of you are making the opposite assumption, and I guess that makes more sense? Especially since she is a pdoc and should have known better, I guess?

What kind of thing can cause someone to have a sanction against them?

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I would probably call to get details but pass in the long run. My main concern is that the only reason a board would know about it if it happened after she was licensed (which sounds like the case) is if she somehow messed up and hurt her patients in some way. If she had an episode but got someone to cover the cases while she took time off, I don't believe the boards would know, right? It would be just as if she went on a vacation. So that makes me concerned that things actually happened that hurt clients, leading to the complaint.

I would call to get details...but I probably couldn't do it in the long run. Which seems hypocritical and awful.

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i don't think passing is hypocritical and awful, if she wasn't able to manage/get someone to cover for her. That does sound like a lack of judgement. All I'm saying is, with boards, it may not have quite gone down that way so if she had great feedback otherwise, I might call and ask for more detail.

If she seemed really together/honest/with it, I might give it a whirl, if I felt a good connection. I would definitely ask about who her backups are NOW though, should something happen and whatnot.

I GUESS I feel neutral to slightly positive about it, depending on what happened. obviously if it was a cluster fuck of epic proportions and I didn't like the person... then no.

I do think that having a pdoc with a mood dx might be okay, as long as she has it seriously under control.

And 2005 is a LONG time ago....

Anna

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Thanks for all your input!

The first note I quoted, was from 2005 in another state. My state board also has listed that in 2008, her case was reviewed and she was put on probation. That probation period has not yet ended.

I am a bit torn about even calling her. She has great reviews, BUT she isn't the closest to me, and I just don't think I'd feel "safe" with her as my provider, if that makes sense.

I think I'll call some people closer to me, although unfortunately those are the ones who don't have reviews online, but we'll see.

I'm a bit nervous about this process, I just landed with my current provider because she's associated with a MH hospital near my MIL (who could watch the kids for me should I need her to) and she was the first person I called while in a crisis. I didn't research, or interview, or any of this.

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If she's had a second issue, and is currently on probation, there is absolutely no way I'd consider it. If something's happened not just once, but twice, it means she didn't get the message, and get it together after the first time. Making it all the more likely that whatever it was will happen again. I can't even imagine what kind of mitigating factors could make it see worth taking that risk with my own stability.

BP ladybug, yes, anyone can have crappy life stuff going on. And having a mood disorder can make everything harder. I'm sure if I heard this woman's story, I'd have all kinds of empathy for her, as a peer. But, as far as dealing with people in a professional context - any professional context - I expect them to manage their crappy life stuff so it doesn't become my problem. I don't want the woman selling me shoes to be so depressed she doesn't bother to really look for my size. I don't want my pdoc to be so manic she thinks she's discovered a brilliant new treatment approach, and tries it out on me.

I have no issues with seeing a pdoc who has a mood disorder, as long as she's responsible enough to manage it well enough that I don't even have to know about it. I have a bit of a thing about pdoc's oversharing, generally. I know next to nothing about my pdoc's personal life, and that's the way I like it.

Lilac, even if you decide you want to check this woman out, please, please, please, keep looking, and give yourself some options.

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Thanks for helping me think this through.

I've decided that she is off the short list - although she has great reviews, she's a bit of a drive out of the way, and current probation does make me too wary.

I've also decided to slow down my search a bit, give myself time to really think through what matters to me. I just landed on current psychRN due to location and availability, and I'd like to take more care if I'm going to switch.

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I'd at least want to hear both sides of the story before saying no way.

Also, who does the reporting on HealthGrades? How reliable is it? Is this just something a former patient is saying? It seems like that's the kind of information that is generally kept private.

ETA: I checked it out and it looks legit, although part of their rating is based on patient reviews.

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The closest I came to this situation was having a pdoc who's son has BP. It was beneficial to me in many ways because she understood where I was coming from when I called and stated there was something seriously wrong.

Having said that, I personally wouldn't see a pdoc who has BP. Why? A person with a mood disorder can become symptomatic at any time despite being medicated. The second incident on her record could easily be a relapse while on meds because she wasn't taking the right cocktail. And if it happens once, it can always happen again.

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for me, it's not the becoming symptomatic that's a problem it's not having back up and/or not being able to notice when she is becoming symptomatic to the point where she gets sanctions.

i would see a pdoc with a mood dx with enough insight to take herself out of commission when she needed to... i've had times where i've needed brief FLMA at jobs and taken it and woudl do so again if i ever felt I was getting to a point where it was influincing pt care.... that's where I worry with this pdoc. i mean, the sanctions must be there for a REASON who knows what it is.... BUT i am aglad you are looking at other options and taking your time to find teh right "fit".

i always say, 'inteview, interview, interview." that's what I did with my newest pdco, I had set up several appts with different pdocs and was planning to keep all of them but went in with a definite "THIS is my philosophy, this is what I want out of the relatinoship, can you do that?" approach with my now pdoc. Luckily, he ended up being the first guy I saw and we really hit it off so I cancelled the other ones, but if I had NOT liked him so much, I would have moved on.

We were both really upfront with each other and have held up our ends of things, which I like.... He's a very good pdoc FOR ME and my son. My husband saw him once and hated him. So a lot of it is style and what you need and whatnot.... But I'd say do research but the most important thing is how you actually hit it off with the person and if you get a sense that they have what you want....

my take, anyway,

Anna

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I know I am chiming in late. With the one sanction, I would have considered it. But to me, the ongoing probation in a second state implies to me either that what happened was gross malpractice, or that she hasn't yet shown evidence of being able to use her judgment. Maybe that isn't a fair assessment, but that is how it feels to me when I read that.

I know for a fact that I have been treated by p-docs with mental illnesses, and they were never sanctioned. So it isn't just that she has a mood disorder, she did or omitted something major.

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