Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org





Combating Radiation Hysteria


Guest Recluse

Recommended Posts

Guest Recluse

I'm posting this as an effort to prevent the batshit hysteria I've been seeing spreading from news sites and other forums. Please understand, I'm not trolling, and I'm not attacking people who have been swept up in the fear, but I really think this needs to be posted for everyone's peace of mind.

You may have seen a map currently circulating depicting huge clouds of radiation crossing the Pacific Ocean and hitting the US. This map is total bullshit. It originated on Rense (lol) and from there spread to GodlikeProductions (double-lol) and was eventually picked up by well-meaning but gullible people who in turn, spread it to other scared folks.

Kinda' like herpes, really.

Anyway, again, the map is utter bullshit. It depicts a Chernobyl-esque spread of radiation that is NOT FUCKING POSSIBLE with the type of reactors (light water reactors) at the Fukushima facility. Yes, it's going to be bad, it has the potential to be very damned bad, but it will all be local to Japan, probably within a few miles of the reactor itself.

If you live outside of Japan, there is no reason to panic. At all.

Don't let yourself get swept up in bullshit sensationalism.

Sorry, I don't mean to sound like a big bag o'douche, but I'm seeing a lot of Americans freaking out about radiation spreading across the Pacific, which is almost as shallow and disgusting as seeing people evacuate fucking 3rd story buildings in Fort Stockton, Texas (Capitol of the Middle-of-Nowhere) on September 11th.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 58
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Thanks for posting this, I was going to post something similar. I honestly despise our hysterical news media for perpetrating these things. They may throw in a sentence about how it's "probably not going to happen" but OMG! look at the possibility of it happening! What will we DO! ?!

asshats.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this, Recluse. I was dismayed to be reading the news online yesterday afternoon and see so much emphasis on the possibility of the tsunami reaching the west coast of the U.S., which on some sites seemed to be getting more air time than what was going on in Japan at the time. I realize we're the absolutely most important people in the world, but good grief, at some point it's just embarassing how dumb and self-centered the average American is! :wall:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you're right. because the explosion was NOT in the core containment, it will not be like tjernobyl.

it will be bad close to the reactor, and i really feel for those people. especially the workers who have to be there.

i used to work in the nuclear industry in a previous career life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this, Recluse. I was dismayed to be reading the news online yesterday afternoon and see so much emphasis on the possibility of the tsunami reaching the west coast of the U.S., which on some sites seemed to be getting more air time than what was going on in Japan at the time. I realize we're the absolutely most important people in the world, but good grief, at some point it's just embarassing how dumb and self-centered the average American is! :wall:

I agree with you on the sensationalism, but a tsunami coming to our shores would be a big deal in the media even if nothing happened in Japan. It is a big deal in itself. The USGS also was the driver of the concern. They did their job. Hawaii needed time to set up an evacuation plan for coastal areas. Here, officials needed time to shut all the beaches down and for boat owners to take their boats to sea if in unsafe harbors. We might not always like the media, but it is efficient at getting this type of data out to the population, which sort of needed to know it wasn't a good day for a swim.

Estimated damages for the boats that stayed in one small harbor here are $15M. Those who did take their boats out sustained no damages. Here is CA.

I guess I am a little irritated because we hear about all the hurricanes and tornedos and flooding and everything else on the east coast and mid-west all the time. Here it sounds like sensationalized crap that should stop clogging my airwaves, but there the population probably needs to know, so most people just accept that it's the price of media.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, it's sensationalized crap even when you're in the midst of it. Hurricanes especially seem to get overkill coverage due to the time it takes them to reach land, and when one is on its way, only an invasion by Martians would take precedence in the news coverage. And it can go on for days and days....

I also lived on the west coast for some years and remember seeing the tsunami escape route signs posted along the roads, but are there many places that have a siren system? That seems like it would be the most helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thank you Recluse... seriously, you were right that some of us need to hear that, especially in this community where some of us tend toward paranoia and use bad press sources to validate said paranoia (guilty). :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Correct information is important, yes. Panic is not warranted. This is the information that has been released so far, as well as information revealed by nuclear physicists.

  • The number 1 reactor (Daiichi) vented radioactive vapors in order to lower pressure. However, the level of radiation was inconsequential.

  • An explosion at the plant destroyed the side wall and top of the building holding the reactor - but not the reactor itself.

  • Part of the core has melted releasing a small amount of radiation. This radiation is no higher than the level of exposure considered ok per year. Isotopes present around the plant prove this fact since they are created by nuclear fusion fission. Fusion fission that occurs with a melting rod.

  • The evacuation was raised from 6 kilometers to 10 due to this, and the government is preparing to dispense iodine tablets which blocks a primary radioactive material from entering the thyroid gland (a gland that is particularity susceptible).

  • Seawater is now being pumped into the reactor in an attempt to cool it down - preventing further melting. A nuclear physicist in the US states that this is a last ditch effort because the corrosive nature of salt in the water will do damage to the reactor - making this option less than ideal.

  • The system used in Japan is different from the system used in Chernobyl. The later used carbon to control the reaction. Carbon is ignitable & played a big role in that disaster. In the former, water is used instead.

  • If a meltdown occurs, strontium, cesium, and iodine (different type than what will be ingested) will be released into the atmosphere. Some will dissipate, others will be pushed away from the island and people by an East to West wind direction (this flow is fairly consistent for the island). Others will fall over the affected region, perhaps slightly farther than the evacuated area since residents are being urged to stay inside.

  • If a meltdown occurs it is estimated that it would take two years to clear the area after incasing the reactor in a special kind of concrete made to block radioactivity.

  • It is possible for a very limited amount of the radioactive particles to reach the US due to the Pacific Jet Stream. The consequence of which would be long-term, presenting as an increase in cancer rates. No immediate danger would occur. And this is a possibility again, not a certainty.

Edit: Also a second reactor (Daini) is having issues with the coolant. However, it is of no immediate concern.

Correction: It is the #3 Reactor at Daiichi (dye-itch) that is having the major coolant issues. Daini (dye-knee) reactors have a buildup of pressure that will probably be vented along the lines of Daiichi 1. Evacuations have occurred for a radius of 3 kilometers around Daini.

Note - Ichi means "one" in Japanese and Ni means "two".. so that's how you tell the facilities apart.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Others will fall over the affected region, perhaps slightly farther than the evacuated area since residents are being urged to stay inside.

The evacuated area has been increased to 20 kilometers. It is unknown if it will increase further.

Also, there are other statements citing a longer time period until the area would be inhabitable should a meltdown occur. Not particularly surprising.. I thought two years seemed rather short.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[*]Part of the core has melted releasing a small amount of radiation. This radiation is no higher than the level of exposure considered ok per year. Isotopes present around the plant prove this fact since they are created by nuclear fusion. Fusion that occurs with a melting rod.

I don't think you mean fusion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[*]Part of the core has melted releasing a small amount of radiation. This radiation is no higher than the level of exposure considered ok per year. Isotopes present around the plant prove this fact since they are created by nuclear fusion. Fusion that occurs with a melting rod.

I don't think you mean fusion.

Thanks. Fission.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, it's sensationalized crap even when you're in the midst of it. Hurricanes especially seem to get overkill coverage due to the time it takes them to reach land, and when one is on its way, only an invasion by Martians would take precedence in the news coverage. And it can go on for days and days....

I also lived on the west coast for some years and remember seeing the tsunami escape route signs posted along the roads, but are there many places that have a siren system? That seems like it would be the most helpful.

Martians... you made me laugh.

No sirens that I know of, but maybe there are some somewhere along the coast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, it's sensationalized crap even when you're in the midst of it. Hurricanes especially seem to get overkill coverage due to the time it takes them to reach land, and when one is on its way, only an invasion by Martians would take precedence in the news coverage. And it can go on for days and days....

I also lived on the west coast for some years and remember seeing the tsunami escape route signs posted along the roads, but are there many places that have a siren system? That seems like it would be the most helpful.

My bench mark for priority / anxiety / panic is "is it killing more people than cars do?"

Tsunami signs, when just being in and around cars kills a hundred Americans a day?

(That's a twin towers casualty list each and every month)

No, if you can face the risk of being in or near cars and trucks, your heart rate shouldn't go up for anything less dangerous.

But the news media and the politicians haven't given attention to real risks in proportionate order for years, if they ever did.

"Whoever accused the human race of being logical?" Star Trek IV

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Recluse

No, if you can face the risk of being in or near cars and trucks, your heart rate shouldn't go up for anything less dangerous.

Ladies and Gentlemen, for your consideration, I present the Most Lucid Person on Crazyboards.

I absolutely mean this without any shred of sarcasm or flippancy.

I've printed this out and taped it to my monitor, I shit you not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, and death by motor vehicle is so mundane it only makes a small paragraph in a very local paper. Last time I checked around 40,000 people per year die in the U.S. from motor vehicle accidents. So if you drop off the 10 least populous states to make the math easy, that's 1,000 per year for most states, or nearly 3 a day. And yet my friends worried for me when I went to Iraq...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Daiichi

No 1 reactor: Holding Stable - Partially Melted - no new information

No 2 reactor: Very Unstable - Partially Melted

An air flow gauge was turned off accidentally, causing pressure to rise and blocked the flow of coolant. This fully exposed the rods. A TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) official stated that "We are not optimistic, but I think we can inject saltwater once we can reopen the valve and lower air pressure [inside the reactor]." This procedure worked, however.. the water pump ran out of fuel, exposing the rods yet again. Saltwater continues to be used and an explosion is possible.

No 3 reactor: Holding Stable - Partially Melted

An explosion identical to No 1's explosion occurred. Partial meltdown has occurred. There is also a leak of the seawater being pumped in.

  • Reason for the No 1 & 3 explosions: The explosion came from the interaction between the pressured Hydrogen gas inside the reactor and Oxygen present outside. The Hydrogen gas comes from a chemical interaction between the water being pumped in and the zirconium covering surrounding the rods.

  • The salt water being pumped in will render the reactors completely unusable in the future. Even if no other breakdowns occur and the procedure works, it will take three months to cool the rods in the reactors.. during which the radioactive vapor will continue to escape the plant in low levels.

  • People from the evacuated area are being tested for radiation poisoning. About 160 have tested positive for low level radiation, and three plant workers are showing severe symptoms of radiation sickness.

  • US help has been requested for the Nuclear Emergency

Qualification: "Some experts would call [the melting of the rods] partial meltdown. But others reserve the term for when nuclear fuel melts through a reactor's innermost chamber but not through the outer containment shell.

By contrast, a complete reactor meltdown, where the uranium core melts through the containment shell, would release a wave of radiation and result in major, widespread health problems."

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/2011/03/14/japanese-tsunami-meltdown-fear-after-second-explosion-at-nuclear-plant-86908-22990017/

"Hours later [after the (first?) explosion], the U.S. said it had shifted its offshore forces away from the plant after detecting low levels of radiation.

The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan was about 100 miles (160 kilometers) offshore when it detected the radiation, which U.S. officials said was about the same as one month's normal exposure to natural background radiation in the environment."

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/mar/14/official-stricken-japan-nuke-fuel-rods-exposed/

Daini - No new information

Point by Point Information / Reference:

http://bigthink.com/ideas/31609

© Big Think, Michio Kaku

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...