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Giving up for now - DBT question


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I'm wondering if anyone here has experience with working through a DBT workbook on their own, because such was suggested in a comment on my blog as an intermediary effort while I am out of therapy. Is there any particular DBT workbook that's good? Is it even useful to do a workbook on your own? One of the things I've heard often about borderlines is our propensity to deny our problems and lay blame elsewhere. I think my intense self-awareness is one of my few positive traits, though.

In general, I'm skeptical about the efficacy of using a DBT workbook alone to treat BPD, but I'm wondering if my introspective nature would counter the usual problems associated with attempting to treat one's own mental illness alone. Plus, I'd at least be doing something, right?

I don't know very much about DBT. I've pretty much stopped researching anything related to BPD entirely because I usually end up in tears over reading some article or forum thread about how we're all manipulative, terrible monsters and the like. If I'm being totally honest, I must admit that I'm also a little worried that I'll open the DBT workbook and feel like I'm under attack. (I almost read Walking on Eggshells, until I got to the tagline "taking your life back when someone you love has BPD. It reminded me of the way my ex refers to me.)

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I've done this - I don't have access to DBT where I am, so I've had to sort of scrape together what I can in the way of treatment.

I used Linehan's "Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder" because even though it's intended for therapists, it has all the DBT handouts that actual DBT groups use in the back.

I used it in combination with "The Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Skills Workbook" - it's a green book by McKay et al - it has exercises for you to complete.

Neither of them is at all attack-y. Walking on Eggshells is one of those books that is really intended for PFF (partners friends and family) and those tend to be the worst for stigma and weird crap. Have you read any of the books that are actually for people with BPD? I can recommend some if you want - I know a bunch of memoirs and also some more factual books that aren't all full of weirdness.

Certainly it's best to do the work in therapy, but I've been in that in between place as well, and it did help me some to go through the workbooks. Not as good as real DBT, I'd imagine, but something, at least.

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These are good books to use in the absence of DBT-proper. Definitely not the kind of books that are going to vilify or hurl insults. They are totally skills-focused. My only caution is that doing DBT from a book is like trying to learn ballet from text. Good for supplemental learning. But hands-on instruction is necessary to get it right.

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Getting a DBT workbook will at least keep your mind thinking about the skills. Nothing beats working through them with a group, but I've found DBT to be the best non-judgmental approach and best skill set to learn for all sorts of MI. I am bipolar and went through DBT training twice. Now I work those skills alone and still pull out my notebooks/journals, etc when things get overwhelming. We didn't get a workbook so I don't have a title for you. Everything with us was whiteboards, handouts, talking, and hands on. Big believer in DBT.

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