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TheNewBlack

DBT experiences?

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Hi all.

I'm currently waiting on an assessment with my Primary MH Care Unit to figure out what support I need, and something that has been mentioned a few times is DBT... I was wondering what anyone's experiences of this therapy are?

TNB x

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I "graduated" from DBT about 8 years ago when I was 21. I went through an intensive outpatient program for 12 weeks and then saw a private therapist for over a year. DBT helped me a lot. I highly recommend it.

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I had a bad bout of depression for five years (I have bipolar II disorder) and I would highly recommend it. (not the bipolar disorder-the DBT ha!) It taught me how to live again. Hope you get a great teacher/teachers!

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Snugglepuss - that's really encouraging to hear, thankyou.

SunshineOutside - haha, yeah... I think I'll give the bipolar a miss, if that's alright :P I'm glad to hear that it's helped you so much. Thankyou for the hopes for a great teacher.... I hope so too!

I have heard mostly negative stories about it, so it helps to know that there's 2 people straight off that recommend it!

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I have yet to do it as well. What things did DBT help with most? Can you describe the process?

(Not meaning to thread-jack TheNewBlack.. figured you'd like to hear these answers too. If you disagree I'm fine with taking off my post.)

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I have yet to do it as well. What things did DBT help with most? Can you describe the process?

(Not meaning to thread-jack TheNewBlack.. figured you'd like to hear these answers too. If you disagree I'm fine with taking off my post.)

No, no, that's fine... Was something I was meaning to ask myself, so thankyou :)

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I had a DBT trained therapist for three years. Absolutely the best therapist I've ever had, and I learned so much working with her. I "grew" by leaps and bounds, though I was dealing with a lot of life crap at the time. She and I did not go through the modules (each section is called a module) methodically, but used them as they applied to various situations. Then she changed jobs, and at the same time my entire life blew up in my face, so I back slid a lot in my use of DBT. However, some of it had become second nature, and I think that's why I am still standing after so much recent trauma.

The reason for the group work is to learn the skills and practice them over and over until you don't have to stop and think about being mindful, or getting yourself into "wise mind" (the place where logic & emotion overlap). However, as with choosing a therapist, having a group that is the right fit is important. When I came out of the hospital, I was dedicated to getting a new DBT therapist & joining a group. Sadly, I didn't really feel comfortable with the therapist, though I thought we could work things out eventually.

The group was really not right for me. I was still reeling from the bomb blast plus a slew of new meds, and there were a number of people in the group that had some big stuff going on, too. Anyway, I left the group, and because I agreed that if I left the group, I would lose my therapist, I was out that, too. I'm glad though, because it was taking a lot of work to feel at ease with him. Now I'm waiting for another DBT therapist, who I will start seeing in a few weeks. I'm going to work on skill use with her one on one until I am in a better place. Sorry for the monologue about my experience....

Cetkat- there is a workbook with exercises to do. Some of the exercises are writing down an experience and taking it apart piece by piece to see what was happening, and why. Some are to encourage people to practice their skills with others (like at stores, in relationships). Some are to be done with the therapist & client during sessions. There is a huge focus on mindfulness, including breathing exercises & guided meditation. Um.... That sounds simplistic-- I know there is more, but I'm drawing a blank.

I really think that everyone in the world could benefit from DBT, because it is at the core, elevating your consciousness to the point that you can really see what is going on in your own head and what is happening around you. I've never heard it described that way, but that's what it means to me.

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I'm glad questions are being asked. Personally, DBT has been very effective in helping to stabilize me, in teaching me various skills that I lost during the worst part of my illness, in teaching me skills that I never learned and in general, helping me to cope with my illness on the bad days and enjoying the good days. I'm tired tonight so I can't go into much details (i just had a crying jag) but you can find dbt specific skills online. Let me warn you, they can seem overwhelming but the skills are learned and then practiced on an everyday basis and they become second nature. The skills have greatly affected my life for the better. I graduated from my one year dbt course about a year and 1/2 ago and I still use some of the skills on an everyday basis. Let us hear more about your journey!

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I see a DBT therapist individually. We've gone back and forth about me doing the group, mainly because my life is ridiculously busy. Now that I'm quitting my job to go to school full-time, I'm not sure if I could afford it, anyway. There are people who do it individually, and it takes a lot longer than if you do individual + group.

I like DBT a lot, and I think it's very helpful. There are many reasons why people don't like it. Some of them have to do with the group leaders, and sometimes part of having a PD is the difficulty in changing the core of how you behave. DBT concepts are simple, but they're not easy to implement. It requires you to change your line of thinking to a way that is foreign to many, PD or not. It requires you to take a level of responsibility for your emotions, and that can be daunting. It requires acceptance of a lot of things that can range from annoying to horrific.

DBT is a complete overhaul in your thinking and your behavior.

There are four modules: Mindfulness, Interpersonal Effectiveness, Emotion Regulation, and Distress Tolerance. My therapist started me off with mindfulness. It is the core of all things DBT. It requires you think in the present moment. It requires non-judgment. It is very Eastern.

Next is Interpersonal Effectiveness. Here you learn how to work with people in a healthy manner. You learn to ask for things in a way that won't put people off. You learn to be assertive, yet gentle.

Emotional Regulation helps one find ways to increase positive emotions, being mindful your emotions, learning to not let your emotions rule you, and how to act against your emotional impulses.

Distress Tolerance helps one cope with situations which can be intolerable. You learn to self-soothe, distract, etc.

Group structures vary based on program. Some programs will segregate people with BPD into a group and people without BPD into other groups. Some programs do not do that. Some programs will have you wait until a new module begins, while others will let you enter at any time. You may find yourself repeating mindfulness. You may repeat the modules. DBT therapy can take six months to a bit over a year, if you're doing group + therapy. Like I said earlier, individual therapy will likely take longer.

If you need skills coaching, your program should be able to provide you with someone you can call at any time of day.

You will fill out a diary card every day. A diary card helps you track what skills you are using, your emotions, and whatever else your therapist decides to have you track.

DBT therapists should meet weekly to discuss cases and review Linehan's material.

So...that's DBT in a nutshell. Hope that helps.

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I love dbt and did a 5 day training with linehan, who invented it. she is awesome.

that being said, even though i use some of the skills with clients (and on myself) I am in a shitty place and about to do an IOP intensive dbt course for myself, personally. i am really looking forward to it as it will give me the time/space/motivation to really intensively get into the skills for myself, from a patient standpoint.

i have found dbt to be very effective in my practice, so I'm pleased to have this opportunity. cuz for me right now, it's not about knowledge (I know the stuff) but about enactment and training.

i've already spoken by phone to the therapist who will be running my group and i have my intake assessment tomorrow. i really liked him and we discussed the fact that i am a therapist and how to handle that, heh, he was a bit intimidated that i'd trained with the Goddess herself. but i let him know that if he doesn't suck, (which i can tell by phone call and talk that he does NOT) i will have no problem not stepping on his toes.... .heh.

so, I'm pretty excited about it. I think I will get a lot out of the experience. I've seen how it personally benefits my clients, and I want that for myself.... just the freedom, space etc., to be a patient, not a therapist.

Rowen gave you a really good description on DBT. I have nothing but good things to say about it.

Anna

I love dbt and did a 5 day training with linehan, who invented it. she is awesome.

that being said, even though i use some of the skills with clients (and on myself) I am in a shitty place and about to do an IOP intensive dbt course for myself, personally. i am really looking forward to it as it will give me the time/space/motivation to really intensively get into the skills for myself, from a patient standpoint.

i have found dbt to be very effective in my practice, so I'm pleasedmedia.png to have this opportunity. cuz for me right now, it's not about knowledge (I know the stuff) but about enactment and training.

i've already spoken by phone to the therapist who will be running my group and i have my intake assessment tomorrow. i really liked him and we discussed the fact that i am a therapist and how to handle that, heh, he was a bit intimidated that i'd trained with the Goddess herself. but i let him know that if he doesn't suck, (which i can tell by phone call and talk that he does NOT) i will have no problem not stepping on his toes.... .heh.

so, I'm pretty excited about it. I think I will get a lot out of the experience. I've seen how it personally benefits my clients, and I want that for myself.... just the freedom, space etc., to be a patient, not a therapist.

Rowen gave you a really good description on DBT. I have nothing but good things to say about it.

Anna

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I found DBT extremely helpful (only did group and not individual, although I did have an individual therapist at the time as well).

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