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Is bipolar 1 and 2 a chronic illness


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I just read that bipolar 2 is a chronic mental illness from the New England medical journal from their case studies and the journal didn't mention bipolar 1 being chronic and I wonder why could it be that BP 1 is as bad as its going to get and it's not chronic??

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Maybe the article was focused on BP II, so that is why BP I isn't mentioned. It isn't impossible that there be a study that encompasses both, but I would be surprised if they lumped them together too often in academic articles in the NEJM. at this point in the research.

Even doctors are still unfamiliar with BP II, and the NEJM is read by all types of doctors, including general practitioners, who need to know a little bit about everything. When I had my foot surgery in January, the anesthesiologist figured out I was bipolar from my list of medications, and he actually asked me to explain the difference between the two. He was also interested in hearing what different types of episodes felt like. So BP is new territory for a lot of physicians.

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Maybe the article was focused on BP II, so that is why BP I isn't mentioned. It isn't impossible that there be a study that encompasses both, but I would be surprised if they lumped them together too often in academic articles in the NEJM. at this point in the research.

Even doctors are still unfamiliar with BP II, and the NEJM is read by all types of doctors, including general practitioners, who need to know a little bit about everything. When I had my foot surgery in January, the anesthesiologist figured out I was bipolar from my list of medications, and he actually asked me to explain the difference between the two. He was also interested in hearing what different types of episodes felt like. So BP is new territory for a lot of physicians.

That's kinda scary. :blink: Good reason to continue only telling my other docs when needed. (They know about the meds but hardly ever ask what they're for.) I hate it when i go to the dentist and every single time i go he asks why (in front of the hygienist) and I say it's for depression. I know it's a good idea to tell everyone that treats you, etc. but I feel like some of them will just judge me/not understand what it means to be bipolar. I don't need the doc thinking I'm there because I'm a hypochondriac. :angry2:

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Guest Vapourware

Bipolar - in all its various incarnations - is a chronic condition. I think crtclms's interpretation sounds accurate, without reading the article.

I don't think it's scary that not all doctors know about mental illness. It's a specialised field. I wouldn't expect a podiatrist to know much about heart conditions either, for instance.

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I hate it when i go to the dentist and every single time i go he asks why (in front of the hygienist)

Dentist asks and I know I "should" tell but I don't tell my dentist what meds I am on. Doctors and dentists can be ignorant about MI almost like the general public, or express stigma and strong attitudes, unless they've taken a special interest in it or have someone in their family who has MI

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I hate it when i go to the dentist and every single time i go he asks why (in front of the hygienist) and I say it's for depression. I know it's a good idea to tell everyone that treats you, etc. but I feel like some of them will just judge me/not understand what it means to be bipolar. I don't need the doc thinking I'm there because I'm a hypochondriac. :angry2:

Meds can have a significant effect to teeth and the mouth but I agree they should not be asking why. I tell them while knowing what meds I take is important, why I take this is not something I wish to discuss.

With my list of meds, esp. Lamictal and Abilify, many say that I must be bipolar. I have gotten some embarrassed looks when I tell them the Lamictal is for seizures.

nf

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Ummm, yeah. Let's hide our medical history from the professionals we expect to treat us accurately. Right. ;)

On the lighter side...

Dr. Emil Kraepelin around 1900 was the first to show that untreated manic depressive illness tends to be a life long and progressive illness. He did this by following patients for years and charting their episodes. There are a few people who have one manic episode, recover and are never ill again. *shrug*

We owe a great debt of gratitude to Dr. Kraepelin for his dedication and perception. He did ground breaking work with several other mental illnesses.

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I have bipolar mixed type so I have both elements of bipolar one and bipolar two.Sometimes I have manic episodes and sometimes I have depressive episodes.So I have both which is called mixed episodes.My current diagnosis is sza bipolar type,bipolar mixed,glaucoma and PTSD.

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That's kinda scary. :blink: Good reason to continue only telling my other docs when needed. (They know about the meds but hardly ever ask what they're for.) I hate it when i go to the dentist and every single time i go he asks why (in front of the hygienist) and I say it's for depression. I know it's a good idea to tell everyone that treats you, etc. but I feel like some of them will just judge me/not understand what it means to be bipolar. I don't need the doc thinking I'm there because I'm a hypochondriac. :angry2:

I've had different reactions. My gp just asks how the meds are working.

I went to a gyn and he couldn't get over how many meds I take for mental illness (4). And, my dentist kept insisting that I tell her exactly what the meds were for and then she gave me the weirdest look, like I was some kind of freak, when I told her. ugh. But, I do list my meds whenever I'm asked.

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I hate it when i go to the dentist and every single time i go he asks why (in front of the hygienist) and I say it's for depression. I know it's a good idea to tell everyone that treats you, etc. but I feel like some of them will just judge me/not understand what it means to be bipolar. I don't need the doc thinking I'm there because I'm a hypochondriac. :angry2:

Yep, my dentist has a open floor plan so there are no rooms, just cubicles. So you hear everything going on with other patients. I am not discussing my medical information in that environment. And it is not the dentist asking, but the hygienist.

nf

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I try to contain who knows about my illness and meds. I try to keep it on a need-to-know basis. I do this knowing there is a risk. I am okay with that risk. I calculate that the risk is low that my dentist would need that information, based on current circumstances. And I can always change my mind if circumstances change.

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I don't see the point of hiding my meds from any medical professional. Should they or anyone else choose to think I'm a basket case, that is their fucking problem. Fortunately, I choose nice providersnt (on purpose) so this doesn't really happen. My dentist is fine with my bipolarity (not so much with my dental HYGIENE) heh.

Anna

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Wj74, I actually was pleased he asked. A doctor shouldn't be reluctant to learn, and should ask questions when they have the chance to learn something new.

An anesthesiologist knows how psychiatric drugs interact with anesthetics, period. They actually are pretty highly specialized.

But if you think about it, they don't have their "own" patients, they assist another doctor. So they have very little opportunity to interact with patients, and haven't followed many patients long enough to really learn about a lot of illnesses. I honestly wouldn't have expected him to know that much about various mental illnesses.

I am always impressed when someone who is theoretically "the superior" in a relationship is willing to ask questions of the "subordinate," because it shows they aren't afraid to admit that they don't know everything, and don't think of themselves as demi-gods.

ETA: I was told many years after I had worked as a teacher at a boarding high school, that I instantly became everyone's favorite teacher when I said I didn't know the answer to one of the student's question, and looked it up right in front of them. People who are afraid they won't look intelligent if they admit they don't know something limit themselves.

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Guest Vapourware

The thing is, if you have a condition that may impact on treatment [regardless of which medical professional you are going to] then you're better off telling, so that they can work with you. Some medication might interact with the meds they use, you never know, even a dentist.

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The thing is, if you have a condition that may impact on treatment [regardless of which medical professional you are going to] then you're better off telling, so that they can work with you. Some medication might interact with the meds they use, you never know, even a dentist.

Oh, I agree. I always tell them what meds I'm on. But I don't feel comfortable telling the dentist that hasn't even heard of the drugs I'm on (he asked what it is) the exact diagnosis when depression would cover it. Especially in front of the hygienist. I once went to a dentist where they would bitch about the patients in the reception area. :brooding:

My GP doesn't even ask why I'm on the meds or how I'm doing. *shrug* Maybe they actually read the chart, I don't know, but I'm surprised that they never ask.

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