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Controlled symptoms yet insomnia still persistent.


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My bipolar symptoms have been controlled yet I seem to still need a sedative to sleep even with it being controlled. The insomnia happened in the same month of my first manic episode. So I would think if the bipolar is controlled shouldnt that remove the need for a sedative? I was diagnosed 6 years ago if that helps.

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For me, controlling the life-long, undying insomnia is the first step in managing my bipolar. I'm making the folks who produce Ambien rich. Even when I'm not exhibiting maniic or depressive symptoms, I still sleep for shit if I don't have meds for it, and nothing brings on an episode like not sleeping. It's my biggest identifiable trigger.

You might want to go and read this:

My link

It's about sleep and circadian rhythms in bipolar disorder.

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You said your bipolar is controlled. Is depression controlled, Could you be depressed? Do you have some particular stressors in your life right now?

I wouldn't say i'm depressed. Mood seems quite stable. Just I seem to need a low dose of trazodone every night. I am starting school again but i haven't been in school last 6 months and still needed a sleeping pill.

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For me, controlling the life-long, undying insomnia is the first step in managing my bipolar.

I have never slept well, even as a kid. Now on my meds I feel more balanced, but sleep is worse and it's starting to take it's toll. My pdoc won't prescribe anything for sleep because he keeps saying "I think this 'adjustment of your medication will probably help you sleep." uuggghhhh

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For me, controlling the life-long, undying insomnia is the first step in managing my bipolar.

I have never slept well, even as a kid. Now on my meds I feel more balanced, but sleep is worse and it's starting to take it's toll. My pdoc won't prescribe anything for sleep because he keeps saying "I think this 'adjustment of your medication will probably help you sleep." uuggghhhh

I know sleep affects bipolar and bipolar sleep. So i'm not sure why doctors sometimes allow patients sleep deprivation like they do. Unless if given an antipsychotic or mood stablizer that they are as effected by sleep deprivation as people without mental illness.

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Comorbid insomnia and bipolar is not uncommon. I've had sleeping problems since a early childhood. My meds, any meds, don't knock me out. So, I struggle with intermittent hours and that's the best I get. If a little Traz works for you, run with it and be happy.

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I've always had insomnia issues, ever since I was 13 or so. For about two years (2009-2010) I slept well without any medication needs for the most part. Occasional insomnia. Since then, I've become worse and worse with insomnia. Ambien doesn't work, sonata doesn't work, and dr. won't prescribe lunesta. I'm trying trazadone for the past four days. 50 mg knocked me out the first three days, now 100mg isn't tiring me out a bit.

My pdoc says that being bipolar often causes sleep disturbances, and sleep disturbances can definitely aggravate BP episodes.

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Those of you who are interested in circadian rhythms in BP may wish to check out psycheducation.org for Stahl's theory of light/dark therapy in BP. he does claim that workinen g with light/dark and circadian rhythms can improve sleep, and even has links to dark glasses, which filter out a certain spectrum of light which you put on in the early evening, to cause melatonin production and better sleep, I believe. I own such a pair of glasses, but I am afraid I suck at lifestyle changes, kinda, so I never really gave them a fair trial. I really should. There certainly seems to be some correlations between moods/seasons/sunlight for me, though I find stress now to be the biggest precipitator of an episode, but I think that has more to do with being stable on dep/risp/quel.

Sigh, since I am resuming decreasing benzos, maybe I should dig out those dark glasses and give them another try. They are easy to use, you just stick them on a few hours befhem on ore bed, go about your business, and make sure you keep them on until you are in full dark, and it is supposed to help with sleep. He states it may lead to reduced dosages of meds over time, though I never really gave that a fair trial.

Anna

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How are they "darkened" technically? I wear my sunglasses in the house a lot, because of photo-phobia from migraines, and I know a lot of other migraineurs who do that as well.

Just curious whether it is a technique worth looking into (for me), or if I have already demonstrated that it won't work (for me).

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That, I don't know, crit. they are yellowish looking and block out certain UV rays, but not all. have no idea if they'd help with a migraine, i suggest you check the site. My impulse would be to say no, unless migraines happen to respond to just those particular UV parts of sunlight.

Anna

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I was referred to a neurologist to get a sleep study. I was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea in addition to insomnia (initiating and maintaining). I wear a cpap. I take ambien. I am glad I had the study.

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