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Normal people don't SI, so is it BPD?


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Just a question, not wanting a 'diagnosis'. :P ........ And this is a question about borderline personalitiy disorder....

SI (even in it's mildest forms) is not done by normal people as far as I'm aware, so does that make the person have BPD?

And yes, I know about having to meet several of the other criteria as well.

I dont think that a lot of non-MI or "normal" people even understand how hurting yourself can help ease emotional pain. I am pretty sure none of my family, or any friends do it. I wouldn't think it's common behaviour in a non-MI person. So that makes me think that if you have SI'd that you must have BPD because I don't see that as a symptom of anything else. Right?

Just wondering what others think.

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Si is usually a coping mechanism for emotional pain. it's much more common than we really know. i don't think a person has to have BPD to use SI as a way to deal with mental anguish. i've Si'd off and on since i was a teen, and i've never been diagnosed BPD. in fact, my pdoc has specifically told me i don't have BPD.

just my own experience. hope it helps with your understanding.

h

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I've self-injured for a decade and I don't have BPD. I do think 'normal people' don't SI (at least not regularly -- I guess people who do it a couple of times don't necessarily have any MI), but I think you can have all sorts of diagnoses and SI. It's just a bad coping mechanism.

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For me, SI began as a coping method for my anxiety. Of course, that may have been the underlying BPD, but I doubt it. At least in the beginning, it was a way for me to cope with my intense anxiety and the rejection I was experiencing from my parents.

I think it can be a coping mechanism related to any MI. I wouldn't necessarily see it as a "symptom", unless the DSM criteria specifically states that it can be seen as a symptom, such as with BPD.

I don't know, that's just my two cents' worth.

N

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I am really sorry, but this kind of statement really bugs me. It is true that so-called 'normal' people don't SI, probably because they don't have the need (but I hate the word 'normal' - what does it mean anyway). But that does not mean that only people with BPD SI. I used to SI when I was depressed, my triggers being a combination of the depression plus either thought control or hallucinations, and I have never met any other criteria for BPD.

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No, SI and BPD are completely different. SI is a symptom, which can occur in many different contexts. BPD is a dx, which is much more of a vast concept.

I self injured briefly as a teen and and am not BPD, just very BP. I stopped because a) other people did not like it and 2) it was not a good coping mechanism for me. I've never really had the desire to self injure since that time again.

Anna

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Interesting, thanks for the responses, just helps me to think of certain things in broader terms than what my thoughts were before.

I don't like the term "normal" either, but what I meant was someone without mental health issues, as in someone who doesn't consider themselves mentall ill in one way or another.

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Ditto with the above posters BUT a pdoc DID diagnose me with BPD because I used to SI a lot.

HOWEVER, my current pdoc diagnosed me with schizoaffective, and attributed my SI to mixed states, which I think is a better 'fit.'

I dunno.

But definitely, SI and BPD are NOT mutually exclusive.

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As others have said, not all people who SI have BPD and visa versa.

This is, though, sometimes something that *some* doctors will just jump to conclusions with... or at least used to.

This happened to me. A psych I had to see after a stay in hospital wrote down "borderline traits" as soon as I mentioned SI. Glad he is not my regular psych.

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We may need to start a separate support group for people who where inappropriately diagnosed with BPD in the 90s and 00s. I was in a very intense relationship, SI'd, disassociated, and had identity problems...Hey wait a min. maybe I had BPD, But I don't have those problems anymore

Is that possible?

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We may need to start a separate support group for people who where inappropriately diagnosed with BPD in the 90s and 00s. I was in a very intense relationship, SI'd, disassociated, and had identity problems...Hey wait a min. maybe I had BPD, But I don't have those problems anymore

Is that possible?

Do you mean a sub-forum? I don't know if we would do that, but if you want to start a topic for support about it, that would be fine (though please not in the PD forum)

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We may need to start a separate support group for people who where inappropriately diagnosed with BPD in the 90s and 00s. I was in a very intense relationship, SI'd, disassociated, and had identity problems...Hey wait a min. maybe I had BPD, But I don't have those problems anymore

Heck, I had my pdoc just about diagnose me with BPD just this year (and a different one last year as well). Due to SI, intense reactions in therapy, and general we-just-don't-know-what-to-do-with-you-ness. So equating SI and BPD (or difficult patient and BPD, for that matter) is alive and well in the new decade, as well.

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