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How do you deal with anxiety that can only be managed by tranquilizing yourself to a barely functioning state?


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I'm dealing with anxiety that can't seem to be helped with much more than medication. Luckily the antianxiety meds I'm taking are supposedly non-addictive, however they do make me extremely sleepy and sluggish. Does anyone else have this problem or have had this problem? How did you overcome it?

I'm using non medication methods of treating anxiety such as deep breathing and meditation, but it can only do so much. Maybe I need to practice more, I don't know.

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There are several therapies that can deal with anxiety, cognitive behavioural thrapy being one of the most effective. Taking medication sometimes only masks the anxiety, rather than taking it away.

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There are several therapies that can deal with anxiety, cognitive behavioural thrapy being one of the most effective. Taking medication sometimes only masks the anxiety, rather than taking it away.

Thanks.

Does that mean that the chemicals that stress causes are still being produced? Because I know that can be bad for your mind and bad for your body.

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One thing I try to use when I'm anxious is detraction. I try to think about or focus on something else.

My therapist has suggested a "STOP" technique to me. What you have to do is that when you start having negative thoughts, you picture the STOP sign to help block out the thoughts.

Though I don't do this, I've heard that yoga can be very helpful for anxiety.

Also, exercise can help anxiety.

I hope these tips help. If I think of more I will respond to this post.

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There are several therapies that can deal with anxiety, cognitive behavioural thrapy being one of the most effective. Taking medication sometimes only masks the anxiety, rather than taking it away.

Thanks.

Does that mean that the chemicals that stress causes are still being produced? Because I know that can be bad for your mind and bad for your body.

Probably not given the right behavioral therapy as treatment.

nf

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One thing I try to use when I'm anxious is detraction. I try to think about or focus on something else.

My therapist has suggested a "STOP" technique to me. What you have to do is that when you start having negative thoughts, you picture the STOP sign to help block out the thoughts.

Though I don't do this, I've heard that yoga can be very helpful for anxiety.

Also, exercise can help anxiety.

I hope these tips help. If I think of more I will respond to this post.

This sounds a lot like what I do automatically. For me it is very bad because I don't face what makes me anxious. I'm constantly blocking out all anxious thoughts. I think that ultimately you have to face the anxiety and try to diffuse it using CBT techniques. I wish I could say that I've been successful, but I haven't because I still can't face the causes of my anxiety.

ETA: I'm told that beta blockers can help with anxiety without tranquilizing into a barely functioning state. I am hoping to get a prescription at my next doctor visit so that I can interrupt the anxiety and then start to work on it using CBT (CBT = Cognitive Behavioral Therapy).

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I still get anxious too. I know a couple of my triggers. One is long lines at the store, another one is crossing a busy street and another one that I know of is being in an "open space".

I'm still on the hunt for ways to help tackle these triggers, with the help of therapy, I was able to learn what some of my triggers are so that is part of the battle for me.

I've been told that even if you don't know the trigger for the anxiety that you have, you can still conquer the anxiety head on.

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The way it was taught to me, even anxiety that "appears" to have no trigger, actually does have a trigger. You need to find out what your triggers are. It is normal for people to start out not knowing what their triggers are. In my class, it came as a surprise to many, including myself, that we have automatic thoughts in our heads of which we are not aware, and that these thoughts are sometimes producing panic when we are exposed to certain situations. A big part of CBT is skills-learning, there are a wide variety of specific skills. And so you apply the skills which includes identifying what your triggers are as you are doing exposures that are tailored to you. It doesn't matter if it's fear of spiders, fear of public speaking, fear of open spaces, or any other fear, the basic CBT mechanics are largely the same, though I imagine they have some specialized tricks for certain scenarios. And when you practice, Psychologists have ways of making it "real" by actually inducing panic in a person, on the spot, including the full panicky emotional content and all the physical manifestations such as sweating, rapid heartrate, shaking, hyperventilating, and all the rest. And when you're in that exposure state they help you learn to other skills to address the panic, such as forming rational responses to the automatic thoughts. And if you do it in a group, as I did, all the better because you watch others doing their exposures and learn from each other during discussions. You have to sort of trust the process and follow the program before you start seeing results. I am glad I did my 15 or 20 week group CBT. In my case is was for social anxiety.

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And I should have mentioned, even when you don't know what your precise trigger is, the fact that they can still induce real panic means that you can be dealing with real panic in a "live" exposure situation and in that state you can apply other learned skills to combat the panic. At the easiest level you apply a set of learned "coping" skills, such as distraction and others. And as you progress you learn more advanced skills.

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A workbook called something like "The anxiety and Phobia workbook" (too lazy to look up exact title) has a lot of techniques to use and has been helpful to me. Also, goggle moodgym or Ecouch for interactive online CBT.

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A workbook called something like "The anxiety and Phobia workbook" (too lazy to look up exact title) has a lot of techniques to use and has been helpful to me. Also, goggle moodgym or Ecouch for interactive online CBT.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you!

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@item0: Are you in any type of therapy to help with your anxiety? I go to therapy once a week. It helps to have someone to talk to that's outside the family.

There are many things causing anxiety for me, many stressors, but the primary stressor can't be addressed by anyone. Where do you live that lets you see a therapist every week? I'm lucky to see mine once a month, and he's very disrespectful about the boundaries I have on what I can talk about.

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ETA: I'm told that beta blockers can help with anxiety without tranquilizing into a barely functioning state. I am hoping to get a prescription at my next doctor visit so that I can interrupt the anxiety and then start to work on it using CBT (CBT = Cognitive Behavioral Therapy).

I'm on a beta blocker for tachycardia. I'm pretty sure i can't increase the dose because it makes me lightheaded at higher doses.

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