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Freaking out tonight


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I'm kinda freaking out. I feel really anxious and my stomach is in knots. When I try to lay down to sleep, it's like mental pinball in my head. It doesn't seem like racing thoughts, but more nervous thoughts bouncing around. Then, when I notice the anxiety, I start to pay attention to it and can't stop noticing it. It feels like my heart is racing, but it's not.

My new pdoc took me off wellbutrin a week ago and replaced it with lexapro. For three weeks I've been taking lorazepam on and off for sleep. Tonight I was out of lorazepam and took zytec as usual, and took some alteril (L-tryptophan, melatonin and valerian root). I'm exhausted but I feel like I'm freaking out.

I don't know if it's that I didn't take the lorazepam; or, is it something I did take. Or is it unrelated to anything.

Am I having a panic attack? I don't think I've ever had one before so I have no idea.

Grrrrrr

Headed to walgreens in about 10 minutes to get the lorazepam refill. We'll see if that helps.

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Hope the Lorazepam helped. Sounds like you're full of anxiety, not a panic attack. Believe me, you'll know a panic attack when you have one, once it's over and you realize you're not dying, lol. You're not alone in this soul-sucking anxiety BS. Hang in there and post often until those meds come together for you. We all understand the agony that you are experiencing. We're here for you.....

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panic_attack

The various symptoms of a panic attack can be understood as follows. First, there is frequently (but not always) the sudden onset of fear with little provoking stimulus. This leads to a release of adrenaline (epinephrine) which brings about the so-called fight-or-flight response wherein the person's body prepares for strenuous physical activity. This leads to an increased heart rate (tachycardia), rapid breathing (hyperventilation) which may be perceived as shortness of breath (dyspnea), and sweating (which increases grip and aids heat loss). Because strenuous activity rarely ensues, the hyperventilation leads to a drop in carbon dioxide levels in the lungs and then in the blood. This leads to shifts in blood pH (respiratory alkalosis or hypocapnia), which in turn can lead to many other symptoms, such as tingling or numbness, dizziness, burning and lightheadedness. Moreover, the release of adrenaline during a panic attack causes vasoconstriction resulting in slightly less blood flow to the head which causes dizziness and lightheadedness. A panic attack can cause blood sugar to be drawn away from the brain and towards the major muscles. It is also possible for the person experiencing such an attack to feel as though they are unable to catch their breath, and they begin to take deeper breaths, which also acts to decrease carbon dioxide levels in the blood.

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