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The Great Soda v. Pop Debate

  

35 members have voted

  1. 1. Is it soda or pop?

    • soda
      17
    • pop
      9
    • other
      9


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I'm in So. California. I say soda and tissue. I will also call toilet paper tissue if I'm blowing my nose with it.

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That map is awesome. Can't believe someone actually researched that, lol!

Agreed!!! I thought it was awesome! I even sent it to my family members.

I've only visited San Antonio a few times, so I haven't heard of soda water, nor have I heard of "orange coke" even though I have family in Louisiana. I've never heard of bubblers, either, but I've never visited the places that people mentioned that they were called bubblers. I've only heard them called water fountains. A bubbler sounds WAY more cool. I'm going to start using it. Of course, people will have no idea what the hell I'm talking about, but at least I'll sound awesome.

I also call all pain meds Tylenol, even if I want an Advil or something, but I think that may just be me, and not particularly a regional thing. Not sure.

I AM SO INTRIGUED BY THIS!!! I can't help but wonder how all of these differences started. Sure, it makes sense that those in other countries would use different vocabulary, but I would think that the states would be more similar when it comes to vocab. That chart shows that I'm very wrong! I'm loving this. It's so interesting. I wonder what other vocabulary differs from region to region.

Also, I'm going to try calling it "pop" for a week and see if I get strange looks.

Edited by daisy

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I called it 'soda' (or soft drink) back when I lived in SoCal, which I suppose I picked up from everyone else, given that map. (These days I don't speak English in real life.) And I call all pain killers aspirin, even though I never actually take aspirin, just ibuprofen or paracetamol (acetaminophen), but this seems to be common here. Actually I have had to explain to people that aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol are not, in fact, all the same thing.

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I use the local term for the part of the UK that I live in. But I don't want to share it because I don't want people finding out where that is.

When I was in another part of the UK (during childhood), I used to call the drink by what it actually was. So Coke would be Coke, Fanta would be Fanta, lemonade would be lemonade, and so on. However where I live now there is a term that we use to cover all soft drinks.

And tissues are tissues. I have never heard them called anything else.

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That map is awesome. Can't believe someone actually researched that, lol!

Welcome to the wonderful world of sociolinguistics. That's all sociolinguists do (well, not really, but...sort of). I can find tons of other maps showing dialect boundaries and other fun things if you really want to see them.

This map is a really detailed one, but there's a lot to take in if you don't really know what you're looking at. Other North American Dialect maps aren't so great. They don't capture distinctions that truly exist (the Inland North area, for example).

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Where I am, we call everything by it's proper name... you'd be looked at pretty weird if you started saying "kleenex" instead of "tissue"!

@Daisy: I'm in the UK.

Ah, but I'm in the UK and I Hoover with a Dyson. I'd never "Dyson" the carpet, and rarely "vacuum" it. One more brand that has won the name game.

Also in the UK, "Sellotape" when almost any brand of clear sticky tape is being used.

But back to drinks, "pop" and "soda " are both sound archaic to my ear. Either the particular brand or "soft-drink" get used, mostly.

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That map is awesome. Can't believe someone actually researched that, lol!

Welcome to the wonderful world of sociolinguistics. That's all sociolinguists do (well, not really, but...sort of). I can find tons of other maps showing dialect boundaries and other fun things if you really want to see them.

This map is a really detailed one, but there's a lot to take in if you don't really know what you're looking at. Other North American Dialect maps aren't so great. They don't capture distinctions that truly exist (the Inland North area, for example).

I'm totally going to start researching sociolinguistics. This is just so intriguing to me! I didn't realize that people studied this or how much our vocabulary differs.

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As for cokes, sodas, pops, soft drinks, gingers, etc... What brand is most common where you live?

I live in Dallas, Texas. Most people I know prefer Dr Pepper, myself included. Coke would be a close second. (I'm not differentiating between diet or non-diet drinks.)

And I just have to ask y'all one thing about vocabulary that is unrelated to what we all call soft drinks. I guess it would be a sociolinguistics thing, though. Is "y'all" really just a southern US thing or is it used everywhere? It's weird to think it's something people don't say, since I use it all of the time!

(And I just realized that I used "y'all" in the post in which I was asking about the word...)

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I'm in Toronto. People always say "pop" but would know what soda or soft drinks are from watching American and British television. They would be very confused if you called all pop "coke" though. I've never heard of that. Kleenex and tissue are interchangeable here. I think Kleenex is a little more common though. I've also never heard the term "bubbler" either. It's water or drinking fountain.

People would laugh if you said y'all around here, eh?

Edited by Just Another Random Person

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Most popular where I live is probably Coca Cola, which I cannot stand. I prefer orange juice, preferably the freshly squeezed one (I don't really like 'from concentrate'). Or blackcurrant squash (that I call 'juice', I just didn't want to get confused with the fresh orange juice that I like because it is completely different).

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Regarding "y'all":

I live in the upper midwest, and around here the linguistic void left by the absence of "y'all" is generally filled with "you guys" ("hey you guys, dinner's ready"), whether the group addressed consists entirely of males or not. I consider this regrettable, as is the lack of an English term eqivalent to the French "vous." A long time ago "thee" was singular and informal, and "ye" was plural and formal, but I don't see that coming back in to common usage.

But. My mother, who was born in New Jersey and grew up in Connecticut, went to boarding school in Charlottesville, Virginia, when she was in high school, and there picked up the habit of using "y'all." Now she's lived in the midwest for more than half her life, and her accent is so weird that people occasionally ask her what country she's from. She doesn't sound southern-no drawl, no twang-but she doesn't sound like she's from the northeast, either. She's the only person I know who uses "y'all" non-ironically who is not from the south.

Except that I do it, too, of course, since I learned how to talk from her, but my accent, while not entirely fit and meet for an upper midwestern girl, isn't Yankee or southern either. When I say "y'all" I have the strange uninflected pronounciation of someone reading a book-on-tape or something, and people who grew up 10 miles from where I did ask me where I grew up.

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That map is awesome. Can't believe someone actually researched that, lol!

Welcome to the wonderful world of sociolinguistics. That's all sociolinguists do (well, not really, but...sort of). I can find tons of other maps showing dialect boundaries and other fun things if you really want to see them.

This map is a really detailed one, but there's a lot to take in if you don't really know what you're looking at. Other North American Dialect maps aren't so great. They don't capture distinctions that truly exist (the Inland North area, for example).

Hey. As someone who is studying sociolinguistics that is not all we do! :)

I remember the map that was copied in above. And also the map linked here, because basically I've been doing the same thing, but with German dialects, this term.

Most common brand here is Coca Cola and associated variants.

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