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wj74

My son thinks I am nuts now

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and he is right. LOL I was talking to him about doing better with taking his med, and I was showing him how I have an rx reminder app. He saw that there were two alarms, one for morning, one for night (you can as many as you want...) and he says, "You take medicine in the morning and night??" And I went, "Yeah..." He gave me this look like "Wow"... and I replied, "Whatever keeps the crazies away!" :) Ahh, the joys of parenting. And taking crazy meds. :P

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Haha, well I felt I owed him an explanation. :) I don't want him to think I get mad at him (when related to BP, that is) because of something he did. He is 14, for the record. The 12 y.o. knows too but I don't think he knows why, I think it's time to tell him.I just didn't want him to go to school telling his teachers and all that I am bipolar. :cool:

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All of my kids know-- it would be really hard to keep it from them, because I've had some major nutso times, been hospitalized, etc. It takes up so much of my time (the crazy), they would figure it out regardless... It's great that you are telling your kids now. For me, it makes me feel more normal to have it be out in the open.

(I wonder what your son would think of my med routine-- I'm now up to pills five times a day. GAH!)

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I commend you for taking charge of your meds the way that you are doing and addressing with your son the routine you do with those meds. Sounds like your son is very smart and I am glad that you felt comfortable enough to share with him your illness. My son is 10 and when I was hospitalized in Feb. I asked him if he knew what I was in the hospital for and he said he did not. So, I felt it was time I explain to him my Dx: Bipolor II, Anxiety Disorder and ADD. I really don't think he understood all that much, but it was such a relief to share with my son that what I was going through at the time was not his or his sisters fault. I commend you my friend :) Best of luck to you and your recovery.

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That is a good thing, being able to talk with your son about the crazies! I describe it as "the storm in my brain."

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I found out the hard way that my mom was bipolar. She had been acting really weird and then she ended up in a mental hospital and that's when I found out what was going on. I kinda wished she'd told me before it happened so that I could've done something to help - I was only 14 though so I'm not sure what I could have done. Recognized the signs and called her Doctor maybe?

.

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2spirals, that is a sad story. I would like to think it won't get to that point, but I guess it is good that my son knows for that reason too, although I don't want him to feel responsible for me either, you know? I just got done explaining my husbands OCD to the 12 yo, I think I will wait a bit to explain the bipolar too. ;)

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I have a med reminder app too! When I first downloaded it and would go running upstairs to take my meds as soon as it rang, my stepdaughter was curious about what it was for. I made some silly joke about how it makes "crazy me" into "regular me" or something. She often follows me and watches me take my meds; I think it's because she doesn't really know anyone who has to take regular medication, so it's kind of a novel concept for her.

We also explained my MI to her several months ago, when the possibility of IP treatment was first tabled with my husband, because I didn't want her to find out I was sick by suddenly having to visit me in the hospital. My dad had to visit his mother in hospitals growing up and was never really told what was going on, kind of similar to 2Spirals' story.

I remember when my sister had a nervous breakdown; she was screaming, cutting herself, and threatening suicide. I was 11 and my parents told me to stay in my room with our dog, and all I did was cry because I thought she was going to die and didn't know what was going on. It wasn't until I was put into therapy a year later that I found out she was depressed, anorexic, and had been viciously bullied at her previous school. It hurt me so deeply because I felt excluded and isolated in my own family, like I was the only one who wasn't important enough to know the truth. I never want my stepdaughter to feel that way, and I want her to feel safe coming to us if she feels she has problems too. It still makes me sad to think about it, and resentful because my parents did (and still do) everything to support my sister with her MI, but mine has always been denied, ignored, dismissed, and over-medicated so they wouldn't have to deal with my issues too.

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