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blocked/inflamed eustachian tubes anyone?


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I have been having ear discomfort off and on, and went to the doctor and they said it was inflammation from my allergies that was swelling up my eustachian tubes. Does anyone have this problem, and if so, what have you done that has helped? I already take hydroxyzine for anxiety, which is also an antihistamine, but I would be open to adding another allergy med possibly. I take a steroid nasal spray as well.

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Good to know. I certainly don't need more anxiety. I'm guessing the non-drowsy types are more prone to cause anxiety?

Based on this article: http://www.ehow.com/facts_5904670_over-counter-medications-affect-anxiety_.html

it says that either the drowsy or non-drowsy antihistamine can cause anxiety. It doesn't say whether one causes more anxiety than the other.

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I had a very similar problem a couple of years back and my doctor first suggested Sudaphed. She said I needed (forgive me, this is a little hard to remember) to get my head dried out, basically, and taking Sudaphed a couple of times a day would do it.

I pointed out that I can't take Sudaphed because of how it interacts with my bipolar meds, and she put me on a decongestant nasal spray instead. She said it would solve the problem much more slowly, but would probably work. I honestly don't remember if it did or not.

Currently the best product I've found for treating nasal inflammation is Zicam Extreme Congestion Relief spray (active ingredient oxymetazoline HCI 0.05%). I asked my wonderful new allergist about it and he said it was OK to use it indefinitely (it's an OTC and it says not to use it for more than a week at a time). I use it twice a day and it cuts through the throbbing congestion in my head like a knife through butter.

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You can always do a saline rinse - look for a Neilmed kit at your drugstore.

Do Not neglect the activity of "avoidance" - i.e., avoiding the things you are allergic to. Dust your living area (use a damp sponge - this captures the dust instead of spreading it around in the air), air filters, special bedding covers, vacuuming the carpet, etc. Avoidance activities alone can make you feel better.

As for drugs - first, what nasal spray are you using? A steroid nasal spray should be helping you - usually the most effective.

The allergy treatment blow out treatment is like this:

1. an antihistamine - e.g. Zyrtec - for sneezing, itchiness, redness; addressed the "prompt" allergic reaction

2. a decongestant - e.g. Pseudophed - for nasal congestion, discharge; may be able to go without it

3. a corticosteroid nasal spray - e.g., Nasonex - for all of the above and more; addressed the "secondary" (delayed) allergic reaction; very effective; good for post nasal drip

4. sudafed - e.g. Sudafed - for reducing a general stuffiness/congestion not related to nasal discharge; addresses the "secondary" reaction; awesome medication

I currently use #1, 3, and 4. If you were to take them away one by one, I would give up 1 first, then 3, then 4.

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I have some nasal decongestant spray to take when things flare up, but I have been trying not to use it much, because a doctor told me not to take it more than 3-4 days. This was not my regular doctor who said that, so I may get another answer from my regular doctor who has dealt with all of my upper respiratory situations in the past. I use Flonase twice daily.

I'm sure I could do better at dusting and vacuuming. I do a saline rinse once or twice a day. I would love to take some sudafed at this point, but it gives me a panic attack, unfortunately.

This is the first year that this has been so bad. Most Summers I get some sinus issues, but this is the first year with specifically the eustachian issues. I'm not sure what I am allergic to, but whatever it is seems to be bad this year.

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Kodos nailed it on the head!!! Pay attention.

One other point: Don't, DO NOT, use nasal sprays like Afrin, with Oxymetazoline for more than two or three days in a row. They ARE addictive, and quite uncomfortable to kick. My pharmacist tells me he has a continuous line of customers rushing in to buy these nasal sprays. I have to strictly limit my use, and try to use only one spray per nostril for beginners.

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i saw my allergist again today, and in classic doctor fashion, he told me oh, no, you can't use any product with oxymetazoline for more than a few days. Which pissed me off more than I can say because the last time I saw him I asked specifically about using this spray, and he told me that OTC meds have to put that warning about discontinuing use after a week or so on their labels, but really it's fine. I know I am not remembering this wrong because I told him this was the only product I've evr used that actually HELPS, and he said that was good and go ahead with it. And this is why I fucking hate doctors. They're always right, and they never admit mistakes. Sorry about the rant.

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Kodos nailed it on the head!!! Pay attention.

One other point: Don't, DO NOT, use nasal sprays like Afrin, with Oxymetazoline for more than two or three days in a row. They ARE addictive, and quite uncomfortable to kick. My pharmacist tells me he has a continuous line of customers rushing in to buy these nasal sprays. I have to strictly limit my use, and try to use only one spray per nostril for beginners.

Totally agree with using Afrin ... i suggest not using it also. It is a bitch to wean off of. Also made my nose bleed (I think it was the cause).

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