Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org





Recommended Posts

I turned vego a couple of weeks ago. It's going quite good.  Still adjusting to eating a little differently.  I eat a lot of fruit/veges/nuts/beans/cereals etc anyhow.

Just wondering if anyone notices any changes in their mood because of vegetarianism...  or veganism. I'm not eating fish anymore, so I'm getting omega 3 from flaxseed oil instead.  I'm drinking nettle herb tea for my iron.  Eating free range eggs, and rennet free cheese.  I think I'm doing ok, just wondering how other crazy vegetarians manage their diets....

Tim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 73
  • Created
  • Last Reply

hi there! i've been a vegetarian for 3 years now, and i've been crazy even longer. i did it for moral reasons, the health stuff was just a nice add-on.

i never really noticed a change in my mood, but that's probably because i was batshit crazy and unmedicated when i made the switch.

feel free to pm me if you ever want some yummy veggie recipes or anything like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi there! i've been a vegetarian for 3 years now, and i've been crazy even longer. i did it for moral reasons, the health stuff was just a nice add-on.

i never really noticed a change in my mood, but that's probably because i was batshit crazy and unmedicated when i made the switch.

feel free to pm me if you ever want some yummy veggie recipes or anything like that.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks! I will pm you as I am just getting into new recipes.

I did it mainly for moral reasons as well.  The things I've seen growing up around farms, and through video footage just guts me.  I just finished watching "meet your meat". Could never go back...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been vegetarian about 10 years, and was mostly veg for 4 or 5 before that. I do eat eggs, milk, and cheese (or at least the ones my meds agree with). My partner is mostly vegetarian. We keep our house vegetarian, but she does eat meat, usually chicken, when eating out or at her office.

I have moral reasons for it, of course, but also practical ones. I noticed that the less meat I ate, the better and healthier I felt. When I finally gave up on meat entirely, I really did feel better about myself and it improved my physical health. I don't know that it's had much effect on my mental health, but my pdoc knows about it and has no trouble with it.

One thing I have discovered is that on the rare occasion I do have a bit of meat, it does not agree with my digestion at all. I have a friend who has a similar experience.

I try to keep as varied a diet as I can. I take a calcium supplement and a multi-vitamin/mineral with iron, and all my psych meds, but don't otherwise worry about supplements.

If you want the names of some good vegetarian cook books -- especially easy/quick recipes -- just let me know.

Fiona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been a vegetarian for just about 5 years now, and I haven't eaten any red meat in 10.  I do eat milk, cheese, and eggs. 

I do it purely out of moral reasons.  I felt better after I stopped eating meat, physically.  More energy, sick less often, etc. 

I have a horrible diet and mainly subsist on veggie burgers and pasta.  So don't take any dietary advice from me. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been a vegetabletarian since 2000.  I don't eat meat and generally wonder why people think fish and/or chicken isn't meat.  I'm not a moral vegetarian.

My health drastically changed with vegeteraianism - i suddenly had a working immune system.  I will never go back, as i love the way vegetarian food tastes.  Meaty food just tastes like meat.

One day, when i'm settled, a little richer, and a little more enthusiastic i'll probably go vegan.  butter, cheese, and yogourt are the last hod-outs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a happy happy vegan, but also a new one.  I started in October.  Prior to that, I rarely ate any obvious animal products, but now I am a label reading junkie.  I think it's too soon to tell whether or not this is having any positive health benefits, though I'm optimistic.  At the very least, this keeps me from binging on cookies at my evil workplace. 

My reasons for veganism are threefold.  One is the moral issue of animal cruelty, which bothers me under any circumstance but is truly atrocious in modern megafarms and slaughterhouses.  The second is a matter of conservation:  in a world alleged to be running out of farmland, why the hell are we feeding obscene amounts of grains to animals for so little nutritional return?  Relying solely on plant sources dramatically slashes the amount of land required to feed me.  And thirdly, health.  I did once go vegan for six months before half-assedness and poverty dissuaded me.  I felt wonderful. 

I have no money now -- my nutrients come mainly from the generosity and charity of others -- but I still intend to hold to my convictions unless my health becomes seriously endngered.  This leads to the predictable awkward situations -- eating three people's salads when the kitchen prepares a supposedly veg meal with rennet cheese (last year they served fish, so they're improving) -- but I feel strongly about this. 

I'm just getting a wee bit tired of having to defend my dietary convictions to the world at large.  Even sitting at the freaking campfire,  I still end up having to give a mini lecture on why I believe in veganism, yet not sound preachy lest I be taken for some crazed proselyte.  Why must I present my case?  Because I wouldn't take a fun-size Oh Henry.  *sigh*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i'm a quasi-vegetarian, and have been so for five years now. i go back and forth with some regularity, as various life-issues compel me -- travelling; moving to a country where being vegetarian's financially or practically impossible; moving back home, where i don't buy the food myself and haven't the energy to cook both a vegetarian and an omnivorous meal each day; being broke and subsisting on free chicken wings down the local pub -- or when i get lazy, because i have lots of stupid food allergies that make the vegetarian life challenging at times (i'm allergic to soy and have recurring intolerances to high-salicitate foods - which includes most all veggies, alas. i could never hack being vegan, even if i'd like to.)

i find often that when i go strictly vegetarian, i get sick easily and have trouble healing. this limits me a bit. i never go vegetarian solely for moral reasons, since i genuinely prefer not eating meat, but i don't really like the idea of eating meat, either. i'd like to find some workable dietary solution, but i'll probably always be in vague veggie limbo.

since i do periodically eat meat, i find i can go back and forth with relative ease, though red meat often upsets my digestion. on the occasions i eat meat, it's usually sashimi, because i find it so hard to give up. (only certain fishies, though. most of them are my friends - not food.)

keeping strictly vegetarian for any period of time longer three months or so often means digestive nastiness if you do go suddenly back to meat-eating, be advised.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm no vegetarian gourmet either Becca, but I have found a couple of easy and yummy recipes.

Try this:

Vegetarian Tacos - use veggie ground round (mexican flavour if you can find it), microwave with a little water and chili powder. 

Fill taco shells with ground round, chopped tomatos, lettuce, salsa, chedder and sour cream.

Super yummy and pretty healthy.

Dee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a fallen vegetarian.  Back in the day when I was a simple herbivore I didn't notice any changes to my mental health as opposed to the current omnivore me.

I still love (and sometimes prefer) vegetarian cuisine though.  Absolutely. 

Karen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, eight years and still going strong. Can't really remember my moods eight years ago. Was only ten years old then! I wasn't a happy kid, I know that though. I try to eat lots of lenses and beans to get my protein. Takes a multivitamin every day. But I do take fish oil to get my Omega-3, the only non-vegeterian thing I eat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I turned vego a couple of weeks ago. It's going quite good.  Still adjusting to eating a little differently.  I eat a lot of fruit/veges/nuts/beans/cereals etc anyhow.

Just wondering if anyone notices any changes in their mood because of vegetarianism...  or veganism. I'm not eating fish anymore, so I'm getting omega 3 from flaxseed oil instead.  I'm drinking nettle herb tea for my iron.  Eating free range eggs, and rennet free cheese.  I think I'm doing ok, just wondering how other crazy vegetarians manage their diets....

Tim

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

flaxseed is good stuff for omega-3s... i dont eat the eggs but i get a lot of cheese (pizza! haha)

once in a while ill eat fish so im not a real vegetarian! oh well

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's really cool that there are so many vegos here. It's all about moral reasons for me right now.  After watching a few docos on animal cruelty and factory farming yesterday I'm actually feeling quite down!  I didn't sleep well last night and the images keep popping up in my head.. very disturbing.  I'm going to ban myself from watching any more.  I know what goes on, don't need to bash myself with it and get depressed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This isn't quite right for food -- but I'm curious. How many of us avoid animal products like leather?

I generally can't afford actual leather shoes, but I admit that I own them. I never buy anything in leather/whatever that I can reasonably obtain an alternative to. I don't go around the block fifteen ways to avoid things because I just don't have the money and the time.

I don't object too much to meat-eating people using leather. My pdoc/therp has leather chairs and couch, but since he actually eats meat it seems ok -- making efficient use of the animals.

Still, I'd prefer a world of vegetarians!

Fiona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The second is a matter of conservation:  in a world alleged to be running out of farmland, why the hell are we feeding obscene amounts of grains to animals for so little nutritional return?  Relying solely on plant sources dramatically slashes the amount of land required to feed me.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I've taught environmental conservation a couple of times, and each time my class has accused me of trying to make them all vegetarians (I did have a couple of successes!).

One of the things I learned is that every step reduces yield by a factor of 10. So, if you take 100 'pounds' of grain and feed it to a cow, the cow gets about 10 'pounds' worth of 'value' from it. Then when you feed the cow to a person, the person gets about 1 'pound' worth of 'value.' Whereas if we ate the 100 'pounds' in the first place, we'd get that 10 'pounds' of 'value' for ourselves!

If you want more precise terms, I can actually get up from my desk, find the text, and look it up for you.

Nonetheless, I find it an extremely compelling reason for vegetarianism.

Fiona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This isn't quite right for food -- but I'm curious. How many of us avoid animal products like leather?

I generally can't afford actual leather shoes, but I admit that I own them. I never buy anything in leather/whatever that I can reasonably obtain an alternative to. I don't go around the block fifteen ways to avoid things because I just don't have the money and the time.

I don't object too much to meat-eating people using leather. My pdoc/therp has leather chairs and couch, but since he actually eats meat it seems ok -- making efficient use of the animals.

Still, I'd prefer a world of vegetarians!

Fiona

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I looked around my bedroom yesterday and saw leather in my boots, and my belts.  Never really looked at it *that way* before.

What has disturbed me quite a bit is animal testing involving drugs, particularly the ones I am on.  From what I've read anti-convulsants are fed to animals, such as rats and monkeys, and either electric shocks to the brain, or strobe lights close to their eyes, are used to try and induce a seizure to test the effectiveness of the drug. 

It's one of the most horrible things I think I've ever heard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

woody harrelson's movie "Go Further" is a really good movie re veganism.  It's a good movie all around, but especially for vegetarians and vegans.

Leather is a by product: we don't kill animals for their leather.  It's actually good conservation to use leather.  To use alternatives is bad for the environment since something new has to be created.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Leather is a by product: we don't kill animals for their leather.  It's actually good conservation to use leather.  To use alternatives is bad for the environment since something new has to be created.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It is more or less a by-product depending on the country, circumstances, and the age of the animal, but the incentive to kill is still there considering leather makes a lot of people very very rich!  From what I have read the process of gaining the skin for leather is not good considering some animals are skinned whilst still alive.  A lot of this goes in China, where there are little or no regulations for animal welfare.  It is also not true that leather is better for the environment, as some pretty nasty chemicals are used to tan the leather that have also been associated with cancer in humans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...