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how do YOU define your food sobriety?


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I have been casually and noncomittaly (is that a word? you get my point) attending online OA meetings and letting my therapist in on my food issues. Weve been tip toeing around it for a while because of the huge amount of shame I hold about it. One of the things (aside from identifying a higher power) Im struggling with is the idea of food sobriety. How do you know when youre being "food sober"? I am not currently on an eating plan, as Im still working out the kinks and trying to make sense of it all. Anyone care to share their food sobriety plan/definition?

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I have learned a tremendous amount about my relationship with food and triggers for over eating through participation in Weight Watchers.  I have lost 20 lbs in three months but the change in my relationship with food is meaningful.

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I could say exactly what bpladybug said. WW has been a huge help to me in becoming a healthier eater. I have always been a good dieter, but I always gain the weight back because I fall into the same old bad habits. WW is teaching me new, healthier habits, including portion control, which has always been a problem for me. WW has also gotten me to become active every day, taking half-hour walks around the neighborhood. In three months I'm down to 186 pounds from 207 and I'm continuing to lose 1.5 to 2 pounds per week. It's a cliche, but now I eat to live, not live to eat.

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I've been through the initial weight gain from the meds, the anti-psychotics and the neuroleptics   I've been through the weight gain from being a sedentary lump by being zombied out by the meds.  I put on weight when they ramped up the meds really high.  I also put on the pounds associated with quitting smoking.  I've also lost all of that weight.  Believe it or not, there is a simple, guaranteed to work solution   Eat less than you exercise and exercise more than you eat.  It's simple physiology.  It may not be easy, but it is simple.

 

Oh, I did go from 250 back down to my normal adult weight of 170.  

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I have recently started weight watchers and agree that it is a very good program.  If going to meetings sounds like hell to you, then that's fine, you can do it online.  There is a points tracker that stores a lot of food items on it already so you don't have to calculate points.  And calculating the points isn't that hard, anyway. 

 

I've also been reading a diet book called "Choose More, Lose More for Life" by the guy who does "Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition."  I am doing a carb cycling diet where I only eat carbs at breakfast for half the week, then for the other half of the week I eat more carbs.  I think this is supposed to increase your metabolism and help you lose weight.  I find having a structured plan for food like that is helpful, and I enjoy the challenge of sticking to the diet.

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I had trouble relating with OA.

 

But, if I had to say what food sobriety means to me - it's that I feel controlled when I eat.  I'm eating because I'm hungry, for nutrition, eating nutritionally sound food (mostly) and am being healthy.

 

I'm still not totally there.  I wasn't food sober tonight, but I'm way better than I used to be and that makes me proud. 

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Thanks everyone... Im not necessarily looking to lose weight at the moment, more to get on a steady path with food. I emotional binge and these days Im emotional pretty much all the time. Im having a hard time relating as well Jam. My therapist tells me to keep going and see what I can get out of it, but it seems so rigid. I am doing leaps and bounds better than I was a year or so ago, but Im still not where I want to be. I have a hard time with the definition of "food sobriety" because the definition is kind of fluid to each persons needs. For today, Im trying to just eat healthful food only when Im hungry.

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I could say exactly what bpladybug said. WW has been a huge help to me in becoming a healthier eater. I have always been a good dieter, but I always gain the weight back because I fall into the same old bad habits. WW is teaching me new, healthier habits, including portion control, which has always been a problem for me. WW has also gotten me to become active every day, taking half-hour walks around the neighborhood. In three months I'm down to 186 pounds from 207 and I'm continuing to lose 1.5 to 2 pounds per week. It's a cliche, but now I eat to live, not live to eat.

that is interesting that we both lost 20 lbs in three month, and feel the same way about all the learning, education, and support from WW

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  • 3 weeks later...

I LOVE the term "food sobriety"! I haven't heard it said like that before, but I feel it's a perfect way to sum up how I've treated food since I hit adolescence. When I am "dieting," I'm starving - and I feel good that I can say "no" to food and my self image is much better. Of course, I always end up hitting a "I can't take this anymore" point and start eating again, which has never been healthy. January-March this year, I dropped 20+ pounds, and then, when my tipping point came, frozen pizza, pasta, cheese, cheese, sour cream, potato chips, cookies, and ice cream is what I bought every time I went to the store for the past 3 months. ---- These foods are usually my "have to puke after" foods (and are okay on my 'starving sprees'), but I hate the process of puking, and because more often than not I'd fall asleep before I puked, I gained 25. I should say, when I go "back to eating" I feel good because I'm letting myself eat what I want. ..

 

Obviously, I have a really misconstrued image of eating. BUT I am really hopeful on some advice that I am getting from one of my managers. She is encouraging me to eat "as fresh as I can" - which means whole fruits, vegetables, and lean meats - not processed foods. I have to say, I haven't felt better. Okay, it's only been three days (so we aren't at tipping point - ha!) Elementary, I know, but I genuinely feel satisfied, which is unbelievable.

 

My sobriety is to

EAT something for breakfast (banana + yogurt),

something at 10:30 (cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli),

LUNCH SALAD (leafy greens that FILL ME UP with green olives, peppers, chicken or ham -- & dip it in dressing on the side - I use way less dressing this way and it tastes like I am using the same amount if I poured it over the top!),

SNACK at 3:00 (fresh fruit - I literally just remembered that I love plums, but haven't had them since I was a kid, I'm pretty stoked),

and for dinner I've been having a salad again.

 

My fear is that I'm going to get bored with the foods, but I'm excited to learn about new ways to be full without eating ridiculous amounts of food. Food is also off limits at 8:00pm, and it's been really hard to not eat the package of Ramen that is still in my cupboard =)

 

GOOD luck with your food sobriety!

 

PS: I also really like taking apple cider vinegar 2x a day... mix 2Tb with a cup and a half of water... it whitens your teeth (vinegar attacks stains, crazy) and it really helps with heartburn... plus I have a theory that it's curbing my appetite ----- BUT vinegar is crazy acidic, so can be bad for your enamel if exposed to it for a long time -- brush your teeth after (or at least rinse really good with water)

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have the same problem with "perfection"... I always feel that if Ive fucked up I may as well make it "worth it" and binge like no binge before. or like every binge before. Im bipolar and up slowly upping my dose of lamictal so I think that once my moods are more even my urges to binge will be less but thats all yet to be seen. Im going to get serious about getting to some OA meetings. Even though I have my reservations about 12 step programs it cant hurt to be around people who are ready and willing to offer support.

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I suppose if your relate it to alcoholism, you can be "sober" and then you can be a complete abstainer. Some people can have a drink or two now an then and be satisfied. others dare not have one sip because that's all it will take. So with food, I think it depends on what kind of person you are. If I buy a small amount of junk, it disappears so fast and I know I'm in for instant disappointment. So I buy something huge and I eat off it for several days, because I'm happier just knowing it's there waiting for me in the fridge when I get home. When it's gone, I feel a sense of panic setting in. So I havn't eaten chocolate cake in at least a few days, but I'm not sober. Trying to abstain but still hopelessly addicted.

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