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Most workers hate their jobs or have 'checked out,' Gallup says


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Apathetic about your job or hate it with a passion? Not only you are not alone ... you are in the majority.

Seven out of 10 workers have "checked out" at work or are "actively disengaged," according to a recent Gallup survey.

In its ongoing survey of the American workplace, Gallup found that only 30% of workers are "were engaged, or involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their workplace."

 
...

 The report found that different age groups and those with higher education levels reported more discontent with their workplace. Millennials and baby boomers, for instance, are more likely to be "actively disengaged" than other age groups. Employees with college degrees are also more likely to be running on auto pilot at work. [emphasis added]
 

Most workers hate their jobs or have 'checked out,' Gallup says | LA Times

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well, I would leave my job but it pays better than all the crappy jobs I held before and pays better than something socially relevant, blah blah blah. I had to admit to a co-worker that I had totally checked out in the midst of a task tonight and that is why I didn't notice that I hadn't finished it. Duh!

 

Hmm... I guess it doesn't help my attitude that I haven't had a pay raise there in -- literally -- 10 years or more. But it STILL pays better than a lot of shit. (I guess, honestly, we were "overpaid" for several years for our size in the industry).

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I can't add to the 60% of those who hate their jobs.  

 

I've had two long-term jobs since grad school ended in 1990, followed by teaching part-time.  I loved my two jobs (of course, there were SOME days)..... but overall, I loved the work and they were in my field of interest and education.    I also love teaching, although at my last job I despised the administrative busywork/nonsense, and I didn't I agree with the philosophy of the school (private, for profit college).  

 

But I know tons and tons of people who hate their jobs.  HATE them.  And when an organization makes it easy for workers to HATE their jobs, those workers become increasingly unproductive, and with regard to customer service, begin to take it out on customers, sometimes without even realizing it.

 

I wish corporations large and small (and non-profits) would figure out that if they treated their employees with more respect, and paid them what they are really worth (what a novel idea!) they might increase productivity and with it, profits.  

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I loved my old job. Used to work frontline in Jobcentres for the British government. Met an array of amazing characters from all walks of life. Unfortunately the amount of sick time I had to take ended in my dismissal and I've not worked since. Would kill for another job, but the chances of me being able to successfully integrate into the workplace right now are pretty much zero...

 

Hated all of my other jobs though :D

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For me, the key to loving your job is being able to accept being very frugal and living on not much (it likely helps that I find dumpster diving and repairing things to be fun activities).

 

If work is something that you do that you can keep up with the advertisers, and be able to buy expensive Apple gadgets, then yes. You will not be very happy. But that is not entirely works' fault, I believe. Although it's the easiest thing to blame.

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The jobs that have most thoroughly screwed me over are the ones that have paid the least ...

 

For me, the key to loving your job is being able to accept being very frugal and living on not much (it likely helps that I find dumpster diving and repairing things to be fun activities).

 

If work is something that you do that you can keep up with the advertisers, and be able to buy expensive Apple gadgets, then yes. You will not be very happy. But that is not entirely works' fault, I believe. Although it's the easiest thing to blame.

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I find my work to be challenging and satisfying. 

 

I feel like I get somewhat underpaid for the skill and experience I have, but that's endemic in my field.

 

My coworkers are amazing people, and this is probably the healthiest workplace culture I've ever had with respect to relationships with my coworkers and direct supervisors.

 

ETA: If I'm apathetic or sloppy about some parts of my job, I have potential for personal and professional liability for my actions.

Edited by Wooster
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I've worked with the same company for over three years. I loved it! After about two years though, I was ready to tear my hair out, I found it so boring. Part of that is related to my ADHD. But, I went to school for 8 months, came back for the summer and whaddya know, I love it again! Sometimes I think people just need a change of pace for a while. 

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Same career for 28 years, for four different firms.  14 years at the last job, which was the best of all the places to work at.

But I burned out, at least in part because the profession wasn't any more the one I'd chosen, 30+ years ago.

Also in part because the difference between me struggling with depression and the professional face and manner I put on as I came into  work was getting too hard to sustain.  The depression in part being due to the work being less and less satisfactory.

 

I've since talked to four other optometrists while having my eyes tested.  They all wanted to leave the profession, given a viable opportunity.

One had only been qualified for seven years.

 

The profession has for years been getting less interesting and less about real professional judgements..

And more like working in a sausage factory.  (Where the important bit is the "designer skins".)

I've known a number of teachers who felt that "sausage factory" sensation too.  Less and less room to be an individual teacher.

 

Chris.

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The profession has for years been getting less interesting and less about real professional judgements..

And more like working in a sausage factory.  (Where the important bit is the "designer skins".)

I've known a number of teachers who felt that "sausage factory" sensation too.  Less and less room to be an individual teacher.

^^^THIS.  EXACTLY.

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I loved my last job, working with dogs. But that was a part-time job, I already had been told I shouldn't work full-time.

 

My last full-time job I expected to love: I was working at an installation art museum, which should have been a perfect fit,   but my bosses were kind of abusive, and hard to pin down and squishy as to what they wanted me to do. I had no ability to cope with that kind of uncertainty. I "talked back" via email at my boss, asking her why I wasn't allowed to go to meetings that were clearly ones that fell under my jurisdiction, if you know what I mean. I was really happy, in a way, although I was also crushed.

 

I had lasted 5 months. I am pretty sure I was hypomanic when I got fired, but honestly, I can't remember the details. I think my email definitely sounded a little crazed.

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I've had jobs that were more "interesting," where I made peanuts and worked 10-12 hours a day. Ended up getting deeply depressed. So much for the thrills of an interesting job.

 

Yes, I realize I have myself to blame if I'm getting too complacent, etc. etc. Yeah, if I weren't MI, maybe I would have the energy to go and get deeply in debt to get a master's degree that would prove to be worthless when I go on the great search for more interesting work. If I weren't so lousy with nonexistent people skills, I'm sure employers would be lining up to hire me, even now, with my bachelor's degree in liberal arts from a school someone once referred to as Useless State University.

 

WinterRosie, I don't run out and buy the latest Apple gadgets and so on with my middle class (practically lower middle class) paychecks, thank you very much. Yes I do take a nice vacation or two each year, but most of my disposable income goes to help out my SO and my mother. 

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I've hated all my jobs, pretty much.  I had one seasonal data entry gig that I didn't hate because the supervisors were cool and everyone was treated like a human, but every other job has just been poor training, poor pay, rude, obnoxious people and incompetent bosses.  It was the same no matter what type of job I was in at the time.  I could've handled it better though had I realized then how much my mental health was out of whack.

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WinterRosie, I don't run out and buy the latest Apple gadgets and so on with my middle class (practically lower middle class) paychecks, thank you very much. Yes I do take a nice vacation or two each year, but most of my disposable income goes to help out my SO and my mother. 

 

I don't think when she said "you," she meant YOU. I translated it as a substitute for "one," If you notice the syntax of the post, it appears that she is contrasting two different types of situation, not directing her answer at you alone.

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