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Seroquel -will the drowsiness go away?


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Hi all,

I've been beaten into submission by pdocs and a severe bout of depression into taking the Seroquel (mono therapy for BP 2) that I've been fighting against taking. It turns out just as I read- I feel so drugged out. I run in the mornings and I am not sure I will be able to keep up the motivation to do this with how bad its making me feel so far. I am also VERY irritable and don't want to be around people. So I'm dopey and angry at the same time!

Can anyone on Seroquel tell me if the drowsiness improves over time so I have a reason not to stop this right now and go back to just regular depressed? 

Thanks in advance

TL

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It gets better. For about a month I was so tired that I napped and slept like 12 hours a night, and I hate sleep. After that no problem and I can take it and still stay up all night, kinda not really the point because a lot of people take it at night to encourage sleep. What time do

You take it?

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Thanks L- I take it at night as prescribed. I really don't need extra sleep or any help going to sleep..my depression actually makes me oversleep and I have trouble getting up even without the drugs! Before Seroquel I was fatigued and napping during the day anyway. :-(

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For me, the seroquel drowziness is there forever. I have been tired 24/7 for a few months now. :( I can barely get anything done. I hope that things get better for you. I am sorry to hear about how you are feeling. 

Edited by CynicalReality
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For me, the seroquel drowziness is there forever. I have been tired 24/7 for a few months now. :( I can barely get anything done. I hope that things get better for you. I am sorry to hear about how you are feeling. 

Same- hope you find some relief...seeing someone in a few weeks and will ask to try something else. 

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So, I assume you are taking 300 mg as that is the depression dosage?

If you could take the XR version perhaps you could take it earlier in the evening.

XR is more expensive however because it's not available in generic. All of this you may know.

I find that at 200 XR I tend to sleep 10 hours a night, and this has not abated although I have taken it for some time.

I would imagine your depression is making you sleep more perhaps.  I'm not so drowsy when I wake up, but I drink 2-3 cups of coffee because I have to get charged to work.

 

I hope you feel better soon and perhaps get a tweak from the doctors.

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I had taken Seroquel for 20 months for insomnia, and I guaranty you that the lethargy and potential apathy will not go away. Rather, you will become partially conditioned/used-to its effects, such that lethargy and apathy (among other unwanted effects) become a part of your baseline. At least from my experience. In a single dose of 400mg or higher, hallucinations may occur. The dependency that Seroquel creates can cause exceedingly severe psychosis if a does is skipped. Furthermore, the discontinuation of Seroquel is primarily due to its psychomotor impairment and cognitive deficiencies, as well as the feeling of being trapped in slow motion. The reason I switched away from Seroquel was its constant restraint and a severe ER panic attack.

 

To conclude, there are a vast amount of medications to help control depression. Seroquel is more of a popularly marketed, second generation medication that, like Trazodone, is often used for sleep. This implies that Seroquel (in addition to its anti-psychotic properties), does not have a known tolerance and therefore will sustain the symptom of drowsiness and irritability. Lastly, there are many Atypical-Antipsychotics that doctors often prescribe without mentioning that the patient may or may not have psychotic tendencies, in order to avoid the patient acting out the diagnosis.

 

Okay, the *actual* conclusion: Do not take Antidepressants such as MAO Inhibitors or particularly SSRIs, because they generally have very poor or toxic interactions with other medications. However, Mood Stabilizers, Anticonvulsants, and Atypical-Antipsychotics can prove highly useful.

 

tel

 

:::Postscript:::

Don't be afraid to talk to your doctor about these symptoms, and what you think should happen, as they are not you, therefore they cannot reasonably guess a disorder without reciprocal input.

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I take 600mg and I don't get psychotic from it. I also have a friend who takes a whopping either 800 or 1200 mg of seroquel. I can't remember. I know she was on 1200 at one point but I think her pdoc has lowered her dose.

 

And why the hell can't people take antidepressants? (like SSRI's) They are very helpful to so many people. Some can't handle them, this is true. But in reality tons of people can and they have saved countless lives.

 

I would like some sources about your assumptions please (teluia).

 

Now OP it may be true that seroquel just isn't the med for you, that I can understand. But I hope that through the other posts you can see that some people tolerate seroquel just fine and that whatever initial side effects they had have pretty much gone away. I also wonder what dose you are taking right now, as that can make a difference as well. Good luck and keep us posted!

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I first took Seroquel when I was IP.  The pdoc had me take 200mg the first morning.  OMG!!  I slept 12 hours straight and had some other weird side effects and thought I was going to die.  He had me take it at night after that.  I definitely built a tolerance to some degree.  At my highest level I was taking 600mg.  I would take it at night because I did get very sleepy, but taking it at night helped.  I quit taking it because I was tired of being tired in the mornings.  It would take 1-2 hours to get going in the morning, but after that I would be fine.  As I got 'better' I wanted to start going off my meds and chose that one first.  It probably helped me a lot more than I think, but I'm off it now. 

 

The withdrawals were a nightmare!!  But I did get past them.

 

Everyone is different and you can't really make a blanket statement. about a med.  I read ALOT about how Seroquel makes people gain a lot of weight.  I actually lost weight on it.  But I was also into a 2 yr manic phase and I was working out with P90X and had a lot of energy once I got past the Seroquel hangover.

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The drowsiness never went away with me. I take it at night to facilitate sleep. I did NOT become psychotic at high doses; in fact, Seroquel ended a psychotic episode and has prevented me from having any since. I never got psychotic from missing a dose, either. Don't make blanket statements about what "you" will experience on this med. 

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I take 600mg and I don't get psychotic from it. I also have a friend who takes a whopping either 800 or 1200 mg of seroquel. I can't remember. I know she was on 1200 at one point but I think her pdoc has lowered her dose.

 

And why the hell can't people take antidepressants? (like SSRI's) They are very helpful to so many people. Some can't handle them, this is true. But in reality tons of people can and they have saved countless lives.

 

I would like some sources about your assumptions please (teluia).

 

Now OP it may be true that seroquel just isn't the med for you, that I can understand. But I hope that through the other posts you can see that some people tolerate seroquel just fine and that whatever initial side effects they had have pretty much gone away. I also wonder what dose you are taking right now, as that can make a difference as well. Good luck and keep us posted!

 

Bipolar Disorder Medication Studies: The short of it.

 

Statistics Regarding Bipolar Disorder and Patients Interactions With SSRIs, Seroquel:

 

Lithium & SSRIs

Chantal Henry, Frederic Sorbara, (et. al.) found that lithium had less frequent mood switches (4/26 subjects) then patients not taking lithium (8/18). Furthermore, the study concludes by saying that "The frequency of mood switching [to mania] associated with acute antidepressant therapy may be reduced by lithium treatment." This implies that antidepressant therapy (with SSRIs being the focus of the study) have a higher risk of causing or exacerbating mood shifts, particularly hypo/mania.

 

SSRIs

In a study by Z. Li & C. Yuan (et. al.), the conclusion states that, "This study demonstrated indicated that psychotic symptom and symptom of irritability were associated with occurrence of suicidal risk after treatment of SSRI in bipolar disorder, and it suggested that these two symptoms might be potential to be the predictors of occurrence of suicidal risk after treatment of SSRI in bipolar disorder."

 

Quatiapine & Lamotrigine In Modern Pharmacotherapy and long-term treatments

From the book, "Essential Evidence-Based Psychopharmacology," the author writes, "In new episodes of bipolar depression, the three approaches with the strongest evidence base at present are the use of quetiapine, lamotrigine[... long term treatment]. The evidence for the use of conventional antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in bipolar depression has weakened in recent years," (pg. 40).

 

Quetiapine (Seroquel)

Taylor M, Shajahan P, described Quetiapine as having "properties [that] extend beyond antipsychotic action, to antidepressant, anxiolytic and mood stabilizing effects." So, if you don't mind the side effects (which go away for some), Seroquel is both very popular and very helpful.

 

The theme here is that SSRIs in those with Bipolar Disorder can 1. Trigger mania or "mood shifts", 2. Trigger suicidal idealogy; and that Quetiapine (Seroquel) is both highly sited and likely very helpful as a single or multi-purpose medication.

 

Search Terms: SSRI Bipolar, SSRI Bipolar Interaction, Others.

 

Sources (Not including explicit sources):

http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924933812743572?via=sd

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19164493

 

In other words, I tried to be moderate instead of supporting my previous claims for the sake of debate.

 

I apologize if I insulted anyone by my previous advice. And I agree that SSRIs and similar medications can even save lives. They simply work differently in people who have Bipolar Disorder.

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Thanks for the sources teluia.

I'm sorry if I sounded harsh before. It's just that seroquel is a touchy subject for me. It has literally saved my life. It's hard for me to hear it being bashed. I have to work on that I guess!

Anyways, How is the drowsiness today OP? And I forgot but how much seroquel are you taking right now? Just curious because lower doses of seroquel tend to be more sedating than higher ones. I learned that from CB people. Don't ask me to explain why though!

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That seems to be a touchy subject...

 

For me, the extreme drowsiness, as in  "I should have my teeth brushed before taking my evening dose because I'll collapse straight into bed within 10min" went away after a week or two. At that point, I didn't care because it did treat my pyschosis very effectively. But now that I am no longer on it, I realize that it was still making me very sleepy, drowsy and lethargic, I now need 7h sleep, on Seroquel I needed 10h. My general energy levels are much better too off it. Just for reference, that was on 400mg, I did do better on 200mg. I personally never understood why anyone thinks it is a good idea to use Seroquel for depression. Pyschosis and mania makes perfect sense, but it is a mystery to me why it would help anyone with depression given how good a sedative it is. But this is just my personal experience. YMMV

 

About the low doses/lots of drowsiness, some doctors told me that supposedly at low doses there are only side effects and none of the good effects. Not sure if that is true.

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It helps me with depression - I had titrated down this year, and my depression returned. Just saw my pdoc on Wednesday and we moved back up to 300mg. Waking up in the morning is a bitch. I definitely feel a lot more tired on Seroquel, but I don't feel numb or uninterested in things or that life is pointless, all symptoms that returned when I tried to go off it. 

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Thanks for the sources teluia.

I'm sorry if I sounded harsh before. It's just that seroquel is a touchy subject for me. It has literally saved my life. It's hard for me to hear it being bashed. I have to work on that I guess!

 

No worries. It turns out that I was mistaken on the multiple benefits of Seroquel after further research (above), and forgot how much it helped when I was first taking it. Does anyone get tremors with it, or upon abrupt withdrawal? I used to have terrible anxiety attacks when I would run out, even though I have never heard of Seroquel withdrawal in that fashion. To not derail the OP's question, I think the duration of drowsiness differs from person to person.

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Okay, the *actual* conclusion: Do not take Antidepressants such as MAO Inhibitors or particularly SSRIs, because they generally have very poor or toxic interactions with other medications. However, Mood Stabilizers, Anticonvulsants, and Atypical-Antipsychotics can prove highly useful.

 

tel

 

I'm not going to get into all the earlier crap in the post, but telling people not to take entire classes of med is out of line. You are in no way qualified to tell people what meds they should or should not take. Feel free to talk about your experiences, even if they are very negative. But do not tell people what they can and can not take, that is up to them and their pdocs.

 

Also, I am sorry you are still struggling with side effects after this long. However, you cannot extrapolate your own responses to meds to other people.

Edited by crtclms
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The drowsiness did go away for me, but it took quite a while. After a few months I was still knocked out after each evening dose but I could get by with sleeping 8 hours and not feel drowsy the next day. After a year I didn't feel drowsy at all, even in the evening after taking my dose, which was 400mg. 

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teluia, you have no business telling people what will work for them and what won't. You aren't a doctor or qualified to give that advice. I've had bad experiences on some meds but I cannot tell someone else not to take it because they're different from me.

 

You're posting a lot of misinformation. Take it to your blog because its getting to be too much.

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I switched from Abilify to Seroquel about a year (?) ago. I had also taken it several years before, as the first drug I was given when my BP(?) was diagnosed. I've both loved it (it was a good change, for me, from the Abilify) and hated it (it was also the first drug I refused to take, the first time I decided I wasn't really ill). The first time I took it, for about a year, the grogginess got better but never went away. Now I take doses in the evening and the morning, and really don't notice any change at all, except for the marvelous feeling of general sanity.

 

So the very convoluted point I'm making is not only is everybody's reaction different, but your reaction to the same drug at the same dose could change with age and other factors. You could cherry-pick any comment from the internet to back-up your desire to stay on or go off Seroquel. My totally uninformed unmedical advice? If your pdoc wants you to try it, give it a solid chance. And, if your life is in the middle of serious changes, don't automatically assume every change it motivation or mood is a direct result of the drug. It very well could be, I'm NOT saying it's not, because I don't know you or what you're feeling. But  sometimes changes like that are maybe at least influenced by other things, and if it were me I'd go a few months taking my meds and going to therapy to see if any other possibly confounding factors come to light and can be worked out. But, again, I'm NOT you, so huge grain of salt. 

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