Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

A CPN (not mine) adviced me to become a peer support worker


Recommended Posts

I went to see my pdoc two days ago for the final time as I have finally been discharged back to my GP. Not sure if I mentioned that. My CPN was off sick so another CPN came in when I went to meet my pdoc. We talked when the pdoc left and she adviced me to become a peer support worker. I thought that sounds amazing! :) But I do have difficulties accepting my diagnosis I am not sure if I am capable enough to help others out. What do you think? Would you be interested in this type of thing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, that is really a compliment IMO! That is really cool!

 

I would recommend becoming more comfortable with your diagnosis. But, I think that helping people with your diagnosis might help you to become more comfortable with your own. It's a thought. 

 

I am definitely interested in this kind of thing. 

 

Let us know if you decide to try it out. :) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am definitely interested in this kind of thing and think it's a great opportunity. You don't have to be a "perfect" patient in order to do it - in fact you will probably be a great help to others who struggle with their diagnosis. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a huge compliment! It does make you think of your own dx and all that goes along with it. I can relate as I was asked to be a peer support specialist by my shrink at the age of 39 working with consumers in the manhattan borough community mental health system. I told him he was 'nuts' for asking me! I did it for 3 years until physical health issues became too much. My training and orientation was awesome! I had to learn, factually, legally and then practically what the difference is between peer support and professional support and many, many other things I had never thought about in the delivery of comprehensive mental health care in my community. I also had to think about me and accept me first and my dx and all the rest.

 

This experience which was positive although at times frustrating also gave me the confindence to start and facilitate a peer support group for gay men living with MI which I still do as it's twice a month and it's not as intense on me physically as PSS.

 

If it's in you give it a try as you have nothing to lose but much to gain if it's for you and your for it. It probably won't cost you a dime. I think one workbook cost me all of 3 bucks and other than subway or bus fare and my time the training and orientation cost me a grand total of 3 bucks.

 

I don't know if your peer program is a based program meaning you will talk to peers with MI only in an office setting usually a mental health outpatient office or a field based program but where I live it's all field based.

 

Consumers would request a PSS and if the request was approved by the consumers pdoc and all others an attempt to find a match would happen. Sometimes a match could be found and the PSS would have an opening and sometimes not due to either the PSS being full or the PSS not thinking it would work out. All I was ever give was a short computer print out of age, race, sex, sexual orientation, the consumer's statement of where they were at in life at the time of the request for a PSS and what they wanted or expected or hoped to get out of meeting with a PSS. I had no idea if they were midtown, upper east side, lower east or bronx or anywhere on the island.

 

It was at times I thought too much as sometimes I would feel their pain too much and want to jump in and 'save' them. But myself as a person,my excellent training in boundaries and promoting caring without crossing the line and so much more along with a genuine liking of people in general allowed me to do this what we called full time for 3 years.

 

We met the first time at the consumers pdoc or tdoc office for a rather fast introduction and after that we met only in public places; libraries, just on a park bench, restaurants. Meeting in the home was forbidden. If not for my acute decline in physical health which makes running around 5 days a week impossible, well, possible but I'm wiped out after I get to where I'm going, I'd still be a PSS.

 

It really is a huge, awesome compliment to be asked to be a PSS. Just by being asked they know you enough to trust you with other mental health consumers. It speaks volumes of you in the positive! Think about it and if you want to ask me anything of what my training and orientation included post or personal message me.

 

The boundary work is intense as they are legally responsible for you and make sure, DAMN SURE, you are good with boundaries. I also had to have both a state/local and federal criminal and sex offender background done which city mental health paid for, FINGER PRINTED at my local precinct and signed a paper that my finger prints will remain on file with the nyc dept of human services and nyc dept. of forensic investigative services forever!

I'd say go for it as if you were asked it's because they see it in you. It certainly is a huge compliment for sure as very, very few are asked. The few, the proud, the PSS!!!

Edited by Brian803
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aww thanks guys. :) Well I just want to mention that I am not given the job she just said it would be a good thing to consider. But still, I am so happy she thought I could do it. I am going to apply for any positions that become available in the NHS. But there are hardly any in London unfortunately :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to see my pdoc two days ago for the final time as I have finally been discharged back to my GP. Not sure if I mentioned that. My CPN was off sick so another CPN came in when I went to meet my pdoc. We talked when the pdoc left and she adviced me to become a peer support worker. I thought that sounds amazing! :) But I do have difficulties accepting my diagnosis I am not sure if I am capable enough to help others out. What do you think? Would you be interested in this type of thing?

 

wow! i was just talking about this in chat as i got encouraged to do it as a volunteer (and someone else mentioned considering it as well)...and i just saw the coincidence thread and what a perfect example this is... ;-)

 

anyway, i've really thought about it as i, too, would love to be able to help others and have of the same concerns it sounds like you have.  i think you're capable :-)

 

i do fear that my history of treatment non compliance/discontinuation/anosognosia/etc will be prohibitive for me.  i'm such a piss poor "example" to be setting, i fear. and if i do it again, will i create more harm than good for others? i don't know. right now i'm on depot injections and that's not likely to end and maybe offers some amount of hope that i won't fumble yet again.

 

i think that you're asking about it is probably the best indicator of your potential success because you're questioning yourself can be a way to guard against it and maybe it'll be productive for both others' health and help you keep your own in check.  it could be a real win win for you :-) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I'm currently working as a Peer Support Specialist, aka, Peer Support Worker, aka Peer Wellness Specialist, etc. I love it.

 

I do see an issue, though, in having folks as PSS's who aren't far enough along in their own recovery journey, since the biggest thing PSS people can do is give hope that "Look! I've made it this far and so you can too!" I've met PSS's who are still actively addicted to street drugs, for example, yet are doing Peer Support work for people who are struggling to get past addiction. Not helpful. That's having a "buddy" - which can also be nice. "Buddies" kept me alive often in my life, when I had no other resources. But it's not the same thing as a PSS, since a PSS is supposed to be someone farther along the path than yourself at that time.

 

Which is not to say that you have to be totally recovered and a perfect human being to be a PSS - far from it! I still have MI issues, but after my life experience and my PSS training, I've learned to manage them so that for the most part I have a pretty calm, happy life (compared to what I started with, that is). In PSS class and through experience I've learned things like how to not get triggered by a person I'm helping - and how to help myself if I do get triggered. My class also emphasized whole-person wellness, so I also help people see the benefit and need to treat ourselves as a whole to get to recovery. All since it isn't just ingesting pharmaceuticals that's going to get us to a life we can enjoy - but also physical health, occupational health, social health, etc etc etc. And I'm still on my own path in whole-person wellness, as well. So being a PSS is also continuing to heal me and promote my continued recovery.

 

When you are ready, do pursue being a PSS! It's a great thing that I wish was around decades ago when I needed it most.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...