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Not going completely non-verbal, but, do you ever have periods (long, short, whatever,) where various aspects of language use are much more difficult for you?

 

For example, right now writing and reading are a bit easier in comparison to listening and speaking, but all four have increased in difficulty for me and I was just wondering if this was normal or happens to anyone else.  It's not a particularly common thing for me but it does show up sometimes, and others will even comment on it.

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Totally get you. 

 

In fact I really prefer written communication over verbal. In fact I struggle with the non-spoken aspects of spoken language all the time.  

 

But the more I struggle the less I communicate. In fact I was with mum last weekend and I didn't even want her speaking to me. 

Edited by helenllama
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I must ask, what makes it more difficult for you? In what aspect?

 

I struggled with most forms of communication; at one time being nonverbal, to being able to communicate easier (and more freely), to almost regressing in a sense to being nonverbal.

 

With myself, being on the spectrum & having social anxiety, having kind of 'regression' periods were almost common. And honestly, almost logical.

 

I'm not sure if you relate, but depending on my sensory issues & anxiety (along with my bad communication skills as a whole lol), kind of depended on how easier & frequent I would communicate.

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Well, I was/am hyperlexic.  I taught myself to read at the age of two.  I have an expansive vocabulary and a highly nuanced grasp of grammatical rules.  Almost all of this has been entirely self-taught, through context, from near-constant reading throughout my entire life.

 

Sometimes with my bipolar disorder it can become difficult to focus my attention on reading, and this can interact with my ADHD to increase the issue.  But this isn't what I was writing about when I made this post.

 

I had just finished a too-long work-week and have other stress things going on, and so was utterly exhausted, mentally.  I found it difficult but not impossible to speak and was definitely not my usual chatty self.  I didn't necessarily stutter when I did speak but I would have difficulty getting out some words, huge difficulty remembering many words I should have known, picking up the accents and ways of speaking from those around me much more easily (and unconsciously) than is normal for me, etc.

 

Understanding what people were saying was the most difficult, and the most persistent.  Of course it became worse if there was any other sound(s) going on around us, but even in quieter spaces it could still almost sound like they were one of the adults on Charlie Brown with the "waaaahhh waaahhh" voices.  I'd catch occasional words and try to infer from that what they were saying, but I was asking people to repeat themselves a LOT.  I'm very direct with it: "I did not hear a word of what you said.  Could you please repeat that?"  But sometimes even having to ask them for multiple repetitions.

 

Reading and writing were somewhat similar, but a bit easier.  I guess because I can re-read as I will, and the usual things that go hand-in-hand with making written communication easier.


This problem has since faded significantly, with the understanding-others being the final holdout.

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I was also an early reader. I could definately read before I started school. 

 

Another thought on speech - my speech tends to be repetitive, and although I can really really talk on Lord of the Rings/Middle Earth (aka specialist subject) I barely do speak half the time. It means problems with support, despite the fact I have known K, C, and L for years tend to go via my mother. 

 

I also find it extremely fustrating when I am trying to blog as I struggle to say what it is I am trying to say

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I wasn't really trying to get on the Hyperlexic side of it. The reason why I asked is because at times, anxiety + autism = sensory overload = nonverbal + auditory processing problems. It looks like a difficult math problem, but it is quite simple.

 

Basically when I am stressed (or anxious) my mind gets tired & overloaded. Which basically causes me to have difficulty in understanding & reading language. 

 

I was just wondering if that is what you were meaning? Because it could also be something entirely different (like disorganization from BP).

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I think that is what I meant, yes.  I mean, I'm guessing here, it's rather new to me.  But good to know I'm not the only one who deals with this.

 

This sort of thing will also help me fill out my disability application.


I can speak, and write, repetitively as well.  Sometimes I catch it in written format, and edit it out.

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For me it doesn't happen too often anymore, considering I have to be anxious & overloaded at the same time, in the right moment. However as I get older I am able to react & even avoid a lot of stimuli that causes overloads (as well as anxiety). However that is exactly what I have found it to be, the perfect combination of anxiety & too much stimuli, that completely tips my spectrum bucket.

 

I am not much a repetitive speaker or writer, I am able to edit myself while I am in the process of doing so. Not sure whether to thank social therapy or having social fears :P but I digress.

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Yeah, quite often actually... just not as much these days since I'm not in school. I'd have periods where I couldn't physically speak for an hour, two hours. It seemed like it only got worse the more someone tried to get me to respond to them (and my at-the-moment inability to do so was seen as defiance...) It's also hard in general to rely on my hearing what someone says. I don't feel as comfortable with just hearing and processing; I prefer reading things or having some other visual thing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

For me its other people speaking. I can't process the words correctly. It sounds like gibberish or even totally different words that I hear. When I was young I was nearly non-verbal due to my autism. Just a word here and there. Mainly echolalia. Sometimes I have problems talking and writing, it gets too disorganized but that might be due to my schizoaffective disorder rather than the autism. When I was young I had hyperlexia but now when I am having trouble (stressed, psychotic, severe anxiety, etc) its more like dyslexia. It takes me forever to process written words as well as spoken. 

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It's both good and bad to hear that others have this issue.

It was... unexpected when I realised it. It's not terribly common for me and I was never non-verbal as a kid. I just previously interpreted it as my sometimes having not very talkative days, and then later with the understanding of ADHD I figured some days my attention span for people talking just grew shorter. And to be fair, both can still potentially be factors. I'd read about autism and language issues but didn't start to connect the dots until after my diagnosis. It makes an awful lot of sense though.

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