Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

If an AntiDepressant stops working.......


Recommended Posts

...and you stop the AntiDepressant, will you still have the same withdrawals?   Let's imagine the AntiDepressant hasnt been working for 2 months as an example.  (even tho it's impossible to actually know this)

 

My Psych Nurse tried to explain this to me at one point, saying there's other things within the drugs that cause the withdrawals, however I found it to be confusing.

 

If you were on a drug, and it stopped working, wouldnt you simply be able to toss it and feel the same (same as in Poop out effect)

 

Maybe someone with a bit of experience could explain, I'm very curious about this though.....

Edited by Derek
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on what you mean by withdrawal.

 

A single drug can have many effects on your body in many different ways - the drug is just one chemical, but it can interact with a lot of structures in your body - various parts of your brain as well as parts of your body other than your brain.  Unfortunately we currently don't have drugs that can ONLY go to the part of your brain that is responsible for the depression, mostly because it's complicated and we don't fully understand what part that would be.

 

So the effects on your mood are only one part of withdrawal.  Even if the drug is not helping your mood, your body is used to having it, so there can be effects on other parts of your brain and body where the drug was acting when you stop taking it.

 

Also there can be a kind of "rebound" - your body is used to having the drug, and when you don't, you may feel more depressed and anxious simply because even if you didn't feel helped by the medication, it was still changing your brain chemistry, and your brain needs to readjust to the new normal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on what you mean by withdrawal.

 

A single drug can have many effects on your body in many different ways - the drug is just one chemical, but it can interact with a lot of structures in your body - various parts of your brain as well as parts of your body other than your brain.  Unfortunately we currently don't have drugs that can ONLY go to the part of your brain that is responsible for the depression, mostly because it's complicated and we don't fully understand what part that would be.

 

So the effects on your mood are only one part of withdrawal.  Even if the drug is not helping your mood, your body is used to having it, so there can be effects on other parts of your brain and body where the drug was acting when you stop taking it.

 

Also there can be a kind of "rebound" - your body is used to having the drug, and when you don't, you may feel more depressed and anxious simply because even if you didn't feel helped by the medication, it was still changing your brain chemistry, and your brain needs to readjust to the new normal.

 

I assumed the majority of withdrawal complaints would come from the fact, the drug is being pulled out, and so the bad mood may or may not return.  But if your body is building up a tolerance to the drug, and it stops working, does that mean the withdrawals will not be there, or are the withdrawals from something else?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no idea what I am talking about, but in the case of illegal substances where people take more and more as the body becomes accustomed to it, a physical withdrawal still happens, irrespective of the effect it is having. That said, psych meds are really unique in how people respond to them, so what might cause a physical withdrawal in me might not in you, what I might consider to be crippling withdrawal may not affect someone else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your body building up a tolerance is exactly why you have withdrawal.  The reason you have tolerance is because the chemistry in your brain is changing to get used to the drug.  When you take the drug away, all those changes are still there.  When it stops working, that doesn't mean that it stops acting in your brain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

When it stops working, that doesn't mean that it stops acting in your brain.

 

^THIS.  You'll still go through withdrawal IMO even if it seems like it isn't working.  It might not be working for the reason you are on it, but it is effecting other parts of your body also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For example, let's take a simplistic version of an SSRI.

 

If you put an SSRI into your brain, it increases the amount of serotonin that the receptors "see".  So your body thinks that there is a bunch of serotonin and it makes less receptors.

Whether or not having more serotonin is the answer for your depression or not, there will still be less receptors.

 

SO you take away the drug and all of a sudden there is less serotonin around, but there are also fewer receptors.  And it takes your body a while to correct that so that it can work with the new amount of serotonin.  Whether or not the drug feels like it works isn't necessarily correlated with whether or not it is changing the chemistry of your brain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe that whether a med is effective for you has no bearing on whether you will experience withdrawal symptoms once you stop taking it. For example say a really irresponsible doctor tries to treat your depression with morphine, it doesn't work but you take it for ten years anyway. You're still going to have a bad time getting off it, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...