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Do you guys think homeopathy could be the answer ?


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Hi guys, i have been going through anxiety ... i constantly feel worried about my career,future and all. Such thoughts have started to occupy my thoughts throughout the day and lately i have been also started to lose my appetite and keep very disturbed.A friend of mine suggested a clinic in my city that seems to be quite popular, however i doubt whether homeopathy can do any good for me. I went through the website of the clinic and was surprised as i could relate to quite a many symptoms that were mentioned therein. What do you guys think of homeopathy ? here is the link that i went through http://mindheal.org/anxiety_neurosis.html

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Homeopathy is popular in some European countries.  Germany for example.  I have used it.  In fact I used it for some anxiety.

It was relaxing for a period of time but in NO WAY is this a treatment for my Bipolar Illness.

 

I only took it twice - the little sugar pills. There does not seem to be any scientific proof to support homeopathy.  

 

And I don't really know whether it was a placebo effect or there was some psychosomatic aspect to my reaction.  I don't know.

I think you need real medical care from a psychiatrist or physician....and if a little homeopathy on the side, if you can afford it,

see for yourself.  You won't get support here on CB.  There is a major Naturopathic College where I live so it is fairly common.

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I've been the victim... err patient of homeopathic and naturopathic doctors in the past.

Homeopathy is fairly useless in the long term and expensive. The naturopath, which is more medicine than homeopathy, charged about $500 a visit, every other week and SWORE in 6 months I'd be cured. So did the other one I went to a year later.

Then the last one I saw.

 

A naturopath is more of a doctor than a homeopath. And they are very anti-med.

I found the naturopath and homeopath to be very good talkers. They would probably have made good tdocs. The homeopath did accupuncture for my anxiety. In all honesty, I was laying comfortably on a bed with music playing in a darkened, cool room, with her talking. Pretty relaxing, but do the needles do anything? Some say yes, some say no, I say no. I felt good after, because she made me feel good. She complimented me, she told me she could definitely get me better, oh, where's my cheque? Do you have better insurance yet? Come three times a week for an hour of accupuncture (didn't hurt or anything, but $120 three times a week, too much) and you'll be cured in 6 months. Again, cured. Six months. 

 

Then I questioned it. What if I'm not in 6 months? The answer was that she would start the "program" over again. What program? I was given little pills to pop under my tongue and not smoke, drink, etc, 15 minutes before and after. They are "small doses of something that would make you anxious, but because it is so small, it does the opposite." Long story short, they never helped, they cos a fortune, and now you can get the same things in health food stores (tiny white pills) for $5.99.

 

To me, it's a load of shit. Naturopathy can help, but they really don't know much about mental illness. Accupuncture can help (welllll, I don't know anyone that's had long term benefit for many problems, most being pain), but so can practicing relaxation, something I learned from my college tdoc. Downloading relaxation app's for my phone cost a lot less than $120 3x's a week.

 

Stick with a pdoc, and modern meds. 

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I had a similar experience with acupuncture ... said it would take 12 weeks for headaches to completely be gone.  I don't remember price or number of times a week I went (it varied), but it cost over $800, and it only worked for a couple hours each time before the headache returned.  And they never went away.

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i'll be honest, i think it's a bunch of bunk.

 

i had a doc who believed i had all these things wrong with me physcially, and it wasn't until i broke down bawling in his office that he prescribed me an AD (this was before they found out i was BP). i saw another doc, a DO, who refused to give me any anxiety medication, not even buspar, although it was apparent i was having severe anxiety attacks.

 

however, i've heard that acupuncture, in congruence with western medicine, can be great for you. so can yoga and meditation, if you can sit still long enough (i can't).

 

maybe a combo of both eastern and western is a good approach- but make sure whomever you see knows what you are taking/doing.

 

good luck!

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maybe a combo of both eastern and western is a good approach- but make sure whomever you see knows what you are taking/doing.

 

^Exactly.  I'd also be careful of their overall perspective of medication in general.  The acupuncturist I went to, one of the FIRST things she said to me was, "stop taking the prozac."  and I was thinking wtf.  I never ended up stopping it, but thought it was a little weird for an acupuncturist to be telling me what to do about medication.  She didnt like that I was on so many medications, and kept wanting to lower doses etc.

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You know, I view it this way, don't go to the hairdresser to get your teeth checked, don't go to a homeopath or naturopath for real health issues, including especially the psychiatric ones.  They are in no way qualified to help you nor are they actually legally in a position to tell you how to treat your condition.  I think the likes of these people who over step the boundaries should be reported to whatever consumer and health bodies you have in your countries and they should be either refused the right to "practice" or taken to court.  I really think there is a good case for good old fashioned fraud in many of these so called "practices". 

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Yeah, anyone who tells you to stop taking your MH meds who is not a psychiatrist or psychARNP needs to not be saying that to people.

 

I think naturopaths tend to have a pretty substantial level of training for working with people on holistic solutions, so shouldn't necessarily be thrown out completely... especially if they are of the mindset that "food is medicine" and "exercise is medicine".

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I think naturopaths tend to have a pretty substantial level of training for working with people on holistic solutions, so shouldn't necessarily be thrown out completely... especially if they are of the mindset that "food is medicine" and "exercise is medicine".

 

I agree.  I think I just had a very bad experience with the acupuncture person so that totally turned me away from it.  I now know what the boundaries are for them, so maybe in the future I'd try acupuncture again.

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Absolutely, yes, Wooster. I wouldn't toss out the baby with the bathwater, as they say. When I think of homeopathy, I tend to think more of tiny little pills in blue topped vials you put under your tongue. THAT, I feel, is nothing but snake oil; in fact, despite many of these types of homeopaths claiming that it's based on "ancient medicine", I feel as though the only "ancient medicine" is the kind that was run out of town on a bandwagon by a mob brandishing pitchforks and demanding their money back.

 

A compassionate and sane acupuncturist wouldn't tell you to stop your meds, I'm sorry that was your experience, MS. I think acupuncture and acupressure can really help with both pain management and anxiety, and I think there is enough empirical evidence to back that up. Of course, I could be biased based on my own experience with acupressure; then again, I was taught acupressure at partial inpatient, so apparently they believed it, too.

 

I think a whole foods approach to life is a no-brainer, although few of us actually follow it fully. Fucking ice cream. heh. Despite the difficulties in living that kind of lifestyle in the modern world, I think most people would agree that fresh, unprocessed foods are better for you than the alternative.

 

The good feeling that comes from exercise is most certainly real; people can even become addicted to it.

 

And there is some validity, too, to herbal remedies; they are the primary source for several meds and many meds are contraindicated for use with certain supplements.

 

Lastly, I think some degree of faith can also be healing - I don't mean forego medical treatment and seek a faith healer, rather I mean coming to peace with your self and the world around you in a way that makes spiritual sense to you can be beneficial to your overall health. At the very, very, very least it can give you something to cling to when all else fails and that is better than nothing!

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I had accupressure massage three or four times a week for a period of about a year, and while it was wonderful for my various and not-inconsiderable physical problems, it served no therapeutic purpose at all in regulating my brain cooties. I found accupuncture to be considerably less useful, pointless, really.

 

And given how particular I am about researching the meds I take, there's no way I'm going to take the blue pill just because some hippie jackass said anti-psychotics are bad, m'kay?

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