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I am no superman. I have a very addicting personality. I've tried just about every freaking drug there is including coke, crack, meth and heroine. I was able to stop each of them on my own. Here's my secret. I refused to allow any chemical to have control over me or rule me. Now let me be clear. Crack, and meth was the hardest. But I did it because I wanted too. The only substance I still use is alcohol and not that much. I'm not BS you, honest. I been there, know what it's like. I've even been suicidal because I had my doubts. But I have a track record I am proud of, I never met a drug I couldn't kick it's ass. I believe that was what worked in my favor. I was told once a addict always a addict. Being the rebel I am I just had to disprove that. After stopping crack cold turkey for 1 year a friend of mine dared me to take just one hit. I did, it was the best damn hit I ever had but guess what? I walked away! Why? Because I will never forget how I felt after the crash, the jonesing, the depression. Like I said I am far from unique or special. Honestly no matter how hopeless you think you feel, if I can do it, any one can! Yes heroine hurt. I turned to whiskey to get me thru it. Any time I ever been hospitalized was for depression or mania, not once for drugs. I repeat, friends, I am NOT unique or stronger then you! I just decided I have to stop! I don't care what the drug is that you feel you can't stop. You can stop it. Nothing is stronger then human determination. You need a reason to try. For me it was my kids, for you it might be some thing different! Never ever give up! It took the longest for me to stop crack. But I did it! I still smell it and taste it and dream about it, but the amazing thing is it no longer has a power over me! :)

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I know you mean well, but I really don't know how helpful this is.  For some of us it's not as simple as "just deciding to stop" .  Especially for those of us who are or were users of opiates, which have horrible discontinuation effects.  I went through four rehabs and several years of NA, and there is absolutely no way I could have gotten clean once and for all without help.  So yay, good for you, glad it was so easy for you, but your reality is not necessarily the same as everyone else's.

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Yeah......no.

 

As stated above, very glad your path worked for you, but there is NOT a fix-all that fits everyone.

 

It's not as simple as "deciding to stop". It's a bit like popping over on the depression board and telling people there they just need to "decide to be happy." (HINT: don't do that.)

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I don't think Indie was saying it was easy to stop. I think he/she was saying that one can stop, but that one has to be willing to put in the work, even though stopping is incredibly painful.

 

I'm not an addict, but I am bipolar. And while I think that telling depressives to just lighten up and be happy would be insensitive, I can honestly say that after wallowing to some extent in my depression, I have been able, very painfully, to start climbing out of it. I had and have to make myself climb out of bed, remind myself that I have things to do, remember that my illness tells me lies and that I'm actually capable of a lot, and yeah, pull on my big girl panties and stop whining so much. Some days it feels like I'm climbing a mountain the size of Everest, and some days I'm skipping over a barely-noticeable molehill, but if I didn't do it I would be homeless. I thank goodness that my illness doesn't make me psychotic very often, or give me debilitating hallucinations, or make me want to scar myself in a heinous manner.  But I also feel that since it doesn't, I need to give it the old college try, if only for the sakes of those who are much sicker than I, so that one day I can make enough money to help them. Many days I pretend to be happy, and guess what? I'm actually beginning to be happier.

 

Scientists already believe that we can heal parts of the brain by not allowing our minds to keep repeating negative thought patterns and remembering what happened when we did negative things to ourselves.So no, I don't think Indie is completely wrong, even though I don't think that his/her method of going it alone would work for everyone. 

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I don't think Indie was saying it was easy to stop. I think he/she was saying that one can stop, but that one has to be willing to put in the work, even though stopping is incredibly painful.

 

I'm not an addict, but I am bipolar. And while I think that telling depressives to just lighten up and be happy would be insensitive, I can honestly say that after wallowing to some extent in my depression, I have been able, very painfully, to start climbing out of it. I had and have to make myself climb out of bed, remind myself that I have things to do, remember that my illness tells me lies and that I'm actually capable of a lot, and yeah, pull on my big girl panties and stop whining so much. Some days it feels like I'm climbing a mountain the size of Everest, and some days I'm skipping over a barely-noticeable molehill, but if I didn't do it I would be homeless. I thank goodness that my illness doesn't make me psychotic very often, or give me debilitating hallucinations, or make me want to scar myself in a heinous manner.  But I also feel that since it doesn't, I need to give it the old college try, if only for the sakes of those who are much sicker than I, so that one day I can make enough money to help them. Many days I pretend to be happy, and guess what? I'm actually beginning to be happier.

 

Scientists already believe that we can heal parts of the brain by not allowing our minds to keep repeating negative thought patterns and remembering what happened when we did negative things to ourselves.So no, I don't think Indie is completely wrong, even though I don't think that his/her method of going it alone would work for everyone. 

 

Attitude is most definitely important in recovery.  But what I read in Indie's post (apart from what seems to be a certain slightly worrying amount of relish in reciting all the drugs he says he's tried) was:

(a) he's proud not to have been hospitalised for his addictions, and in fact it's not necessary to be hospitalised for addiction treatment, and

(b) it's somehow safe and okay to detox on one's own from any kind of drug, as long as you grit your teeth and get on with it.  Oh, except that you can use whiskey if you're coming off heroin.

 

All of this alarms me because it's incorrectly giving out the message that every single person can quit on his/her own, and seeking help is unnecessary because hey, Indie did it on his own, so you should just pull yourself up by your bootstraps and march forward.  Withdrawal from certain drugs is not only incredibly unpleasant and physically painful, it can actually be dangerous.  Not everybody goes through formal rehab; many people clean up through 12 step programmes or derivatives thereof, but I think it's really, really important not to say blithely that every person is an island in this.  Addicts are isolated enough without hearing that kind of thing.

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I never had to be hospitalized or go into detox or anything for my addictions either... but that's just me.  Yeah I've gotten over some things like smoking just with my willpower.  Willpower is something huge, sure.  But to really and truly get off the drugs I was doing, I had to be properly medicated.  No ifs ands or buts about it.  Even if I wasn't heavily using much more than pot, I would still indulge in various things, sometimes to excess.  And there were periods where I'd be doing those other things an awful lot.  Getting properly diagnosed, treated, etc. and sticking with that helped me immensely in overcoming my addictions.

 

That's just my personal pathway though.  I don't presume it'll work for everyone.  We all come from different starting places as it is, different physiologies, etc.

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After stopping crack cold turkey for 1 year a friend of mine dared me to take just one hit. I did, it was the best damn hit I ever had but guess what? I walked away! Why? Because I will never forget how I felt after the crash, the jonesing, the depression. 

 

Wow.  What a role model for all other recovering addicts you are!  I think everyone who is in recovery from being addicted to a substance should decide to try taking one hit (especially if your friend dares you!) just to see if they've really kicked the habit.  Otherwise you just don't have enough will power and are obviously a weak person.

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I am no superman. I have a very addicting personality. I've tried just about every freaking drug there is including coke, crack, meth and heroine. I was able to stop each of them on my own. Here's my secret. I refused to allow any chemical to have control over me or rule me. Now let me be clear. Crack, and meth was the hardest. But I did it because I wanted too. The only substance I still use is alcohol and not that much. I'm not BS you, honest. I been there, know what it's like. I've even been suicidal because I had my doubts. But I have a track record I am proud of, I never met a drug I couldn't kick it's ass. I believe that was what worked in my favor. I was told once a addict always a addict. Being the rebel I am I just had to disprove that. After stopping crack cold turkey for 1 year a friend of mine dared me to take just one hit. I did, it was the best damn hit I ever had but guess what? I walked away! Why? Because I will never forget how I felt after the crash, the jonesing, the depression. Like I said I am far from unique or special. Honestly no matter how hopeless you think you feel, if I can do it, any one can! Yes heroine hurt. I turned to whiskey to get me thru it. Any time I ever been hospitalized was for depression or mania, not once for drugs. I repeat, friends, I am NOT unique or stronger then you! I just decided I have to stop! I don't care what the drug is that you feel you can't stop. You can stop it. Nothing is stronger then human determination. You need a reason to try. For me it was my kids, for you it might be some thing different! Never ever give up! It took the longest for me to stop crack. But I did it! I still smell it and taste it and dream about it, but the amazing thing is it no longer has a power over me! :)

You know, this posting was not in response to anything. You started this topic. Why? You want a gold star? You are essentially invalidating everyone that has had to be IP or go to rehab. Does it make you feel good to put others down?

 

Being addicted to drugs is a disease. Just like diabetes is a disease. Just like BP is a disease. Maybe you stopped. Well, here is your gold star. All you have done in posting this bullshit is to make others that have substance abuse issues feel like shit. Good for you. You feel better? You feel superior? Yeah. Thanks. Maybe next time, keep this crap to yourself.

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