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Once you've got a handle on your illness, you've still got one annoying obstacle (or maybe I'm still depressed) which is to rekindle your interests or develop new ones through introspection. I always loved video games but it still seems like a task to play them. I buy new ones and they collect dust and so on. I never liked reading but have recently engaged in a couple of books. I haven't gotten immersed in either one but it's a start. I bought art supplies and plan on doing some painting.

 

It's annoying to not be interested in anything and was wondering if anyone else has this problem. 

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I used to be very much into gaming, but I've come to the realisation that I was never into the games themselves but the people playing the games. I've been playing older games which still have communities and having loads of fun. Rather than changing game every few months for the latest flashyiest cod/battlefield clone. Not only does it save money, but I'm finding it a lot more fun as I play with the same people most of the time and I get to know people more.

Once you move past the impulse to jump on every new game that's released and just enjoy the ones you have always enjoyed with people you like playing with, its a lot more fun.

 

The other thing I've been doing is photography, I don't always take good pictures but the process of taking them and processing them to improve them is enjoyable for me. Sometimes the flawed pictures provide the most entertainment in attempting to fix the flaws, even when I ultimately don't save the picture and the time is essentially wasted... I still enjoy it in its own way.

I don't always share the pictures I take with other people, I tend to take lots of pictures for myself, then share very few of them. In a way this stops people from being bombarded by my crappy pictures so they can really enjoy the good ones :)

 

 

For a while I didn't know what I really enjoyed, but in revisiting the old things I did enjoy in my mind and figuring out what aspects of them drew me in, I have discovered that the most common theme was doing a common activity with people I like being around. If you can find the right people, then almost anything you can do becomes fun in my experience. Even just chatting to people is a favourite past time of mine, it doesn't have to be anything serious... just talking about your day can be fantastic.

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I do this with books.  I get in a "mode" where I am really into reading, and order all these books that interest me, then all of a sudden one day I'll have absolutely no interest or concentration to read. 

 

The odd thing is, is that I am able to read on-line books.  I've only done this once though, but at a time when I was in no way into reading books.

 

Also I read a lot of information on the internet, but thinking about it, if I had that info in paper form to read, I probably wouldn't read half of what I do now.  Maybe for me at least it has to do with the feel of the paper.  I've always wondered about that.

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It is difficult to pick up the pieces after a depressive episode.

 

I tried out a variety of things like horseback riding lessons, reading, crafting and taking a class at the local community college.  I like not me's suggestion of playing the older video games and I'm glad you've been able to take up some reading.  Look in your local paper (or google) things that are going on in your community.  It's amazing all the different organizations offering classes, lectures, demonstrations, etc.

 

I personally recommend taking a class because it woke up my brain again. Between the readings and assignments, my ability to think clearly and in a complex manner has returned.

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I agree with PR's suggestion---taking a class can give your brain a kick-start.

 

I think you have to understand that you are the same person you always were, but your interests and preferences change all the time.  Be open-minded about pursuing different hobbies and new directions.

 

olga

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I was like you. I still didn't have much interest in things I normally enjoyed. But I found it just took me longer than I would have thought for those things to trully become enjoyable again. I would say it was a good 6-8 months after my mood had started lifting a bit.

Trying new things definitely won't hurt. Like olga said...our interests are fluid and can change. Plus you might just find something new that you enjoy.

I hope you stay on the upswing!

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I struggle with finding something I can say I truly enjoy. I play video games too, for the people not really for the game. I tire easy (and that goes with doing my drawing, writing and reading) so games that don't allow me to interact with the outside world gather dust pretty quickly. I realised not only did I love World of Warcraft for the community but also because I could craft things and sell them on the AH (not for real money) and it gave me the satisfaction I needed. In reality I couldn't do that in real life, certainly couldn't sell what I made but online I almost had a purpose and a 'job'.

 

I find myself drawn to time management games because I like the rush of having goals to complete without the stress of them being real. 

 

I keep trying new things in the hopes that one day I will find something that sticks, and I wont get bored of it. At times I'm not sure what's me just not finding something interesting and what's my MI just refusing to spend time enjoying something.

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It's annoying to not be interested in anything and was wondering if anyone else has this problem. 

Yes - me too, and it has knock on effects on my self-esteem. I used to do a lot of art work but recently it's all I can manage to watch DVD box sets or read light novels.

 

It's great you're getting better. Maybe the loss of interest is the tail end of the depression? Initially it can be a chore to pick things up again - this is only to be expected when you're recovering from depression.

 

Sometimes I find it helps not to expect things to be truly interesting or pleasurable when I'm low, but to just remind myself that anything absorbing enough to pass the time with/ distract myself from negative stuff/ keep my brain ticking along is really valuable.

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I can relate to a lot in this thread. Depression has stolen many of my hobbies and interests from my by robbing me of energy, interest, money, time, you name it. 

 

When I got serious about recovering from depression and started treatment, I made a promise to my pdoc to re-kindle my love of music. That was almost two years ago and not only have I been listening to old faves but take the time to discover new bands that I absolutely love. 

 

 

 

 

Edit: I also play a couple of games that are not so much social though one is competitive and has helped me understanding the concept of competition and being a good loser and humble winner and other aspects of general good sportsmanship. 

Edited by cct
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