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Hi! I have been labelled with psychoeffective disorder


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After years of suffering morbidly and per morbidly,

Together with my psychotherapist we have come to the root of the problem. My feeling is rather than labelling people with some diagnosis, perhaps in some cases it might be useful to explore reasons behind the breakdown. In my case, my problems stem from suppressed childhood sex abuse.

I am currently exploring a non-meditative form of treatment. Was wondering if anyone else was exploring this avenue - would be very happy to share some thoughts. In any event, I have suffered alone for too long and would be glad to reach out.

It is my understanding that with both psychosis and schizophrenia part of the problem is that the victim builds a self protective bubble. Trying to break this bubble can be difficult at times. Although medication can alleviate extreme symptoms I feel that sometimes it is unhelpful as it doesn't allow the patient to explore the underlying issues that led to the crisis.

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Yeah that's what I meant. I used to use medication as a crutch (obviously I can just speak for myself). Unfortunately this did not help with deeper rooted social issues. It was only when I came gradually off the medication that I was able to probe more deeply into my subconscious mind.

Do bear in mind that my shrink is aware of this ;-)

Each to our own,

But I guess what I'd like to do is share my experiences and healing process with those in a similar position to myself.

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Hi.

You may find that there is more about csa (child sexual abuse/assault) in the ptsd forum. Maybe. I tend to share mine in my blog.

Regardless of whatever the insurance company sees as your labels you are still you. And no diagnosis can change that. Sometimes they make it easier because that way you can get access to the services that you need. Sometimes they can help to guide treatment. And sometimes they are just labels. But that doesn't affect who you are as a person. It's not a fundamental change.

I'm sorry for your csa and I hope that you can find what you're looking for. If you have any questions feel free to ask the staff.

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@kt07 - sorry that was a typo. I actually meant non medicative. Although the discipline associated with meditation should not be dismissed ;-)

Winter rose. Thanks so much for your kind words. I realise we are all individuals. The problem with today's society is that it just likes to label and categorise everything. Liberal vs neo-con, feminist, black, white you name it. Unfortunately as you said we are all individual and should not be placed into boxes. Modern day psychiatry is as much to blame as any other profession

Don't want to give any links as I do not want to be breaking any rules here. But dr. Bob Johnson comes up with compelling arguments in his blog.

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I think a psychiatric diagnosis is a way for a psychiatrist to label our symptoms.  A way for other care providers to have a short hand for treatment and diagnosis.  

I do not feel put in a box because I have a DX of Bipolar 1.  And I absolutely benefit from medication.  

 

I am not quite sure that you mean when you say that you have been 'suffering morbidly'.  What do you mean by that?

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greetings and welcome.

 

i'm familiar with the lines of reasoning you reference. i can't say that my embrace of the non medication approach was under the supervision...much less approval...of my psychiatrist, but much of what's written on the subject seemed (in my mind) to support and "validate" my suspicions of medication as catalyst rather than preventer of disease. it also resonated with my staunch opposition to being labeled with a "disease" that i for many, many years was absolutely incapable of seeing myself as having. from my perspective, my problem wasn't that i am sick and medication could manage the sickness.  the only "illness" i saw was the botched socio cultural paradigm that promotes the oppression and suppression of difference in perception and conception of reality. basically, that it's a form of institutionalized discrimination, a civil right issue. the solution was upheaval of a system that uses labels to discredit those manifesting difference.

 

now,i admit...i was not conservative in putting my variation on these ideas into practice--i went with repeated discontinuations on the grounds that "medication is poison" and wrote numerous (relatively) public polemics on the "illness model" of mental health. i didn't set out to do anything but report my findings but when it wasn't ...welcomed...i took it upon self to circumvent that in the name of "enabling others' liberation."

 

this didn't exactly work out well for me in several different ways. and, though i was seeing medication more along the lines of social control, i would caution that the one problematic thing about the way you framed it is the characterization of medication as a crutch. of course, you said you can only speak for yourself and i respect that. many who promote these non-pharmaceutical treatment claims...are not so reserved. arguing that those with schizophrenia (spectrum disorders) could free ourselves from medication if the right mindfulness techniques and or therapy were used properly... when i've seen it elsewhere, i've found that tends to imply, if not pretty directly then certainly it follows that those who don't pursue those techniques are relying on the crutch of medication. and that can be really divisive and make people feel like it's a judgment against them if they can't or simply don't want to chance going off medications. and then there's the counter of sorts that those who can go off medication and treat these situations with therapy, however intensive, are misdiagnosed, etc.  

 

i realize the position i've held is identical to neither the one of the author you cite nor your own. i'm not exactly convinced my position on the subject is wholly inaccurate...though i am fairly certain it's not wholly accurate either. i do want to offer the one "lesson" i learned ...eventually: there's a lot of judgment in society of those taking psychopharmaceuticals and adding to that in any way is something i wish i'd been stable enough to carefully avoid. if nothing else because we face enough difficulty without hurting each other, even if unintentionally. and that said, despite being unable to find success with it myself, i'll be interested to hear your experiences with it. 

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I am not sure that such labels are helpful, especially in any long-term treatment solutions. Sure they can be used as general guidelines by practitioners, but should be used purely as such. Every patient is different, and this is why I believe talking therapies are so crucial. Unfortunately not enough is invested in this area. Instead, focus tends to be predominantly pharmaceutical. Although this suits big business - especially large pharmaceutical companies who have great political clout, it is not in the best interest for individual patients.

If you feel comfort in being labeled bipolar, then that's great. As for me I simply wish to grow into a healthy individual.

Morbidity is what psychiatrists like to label as when symptoms become initially identifiable. Pre-morbidly (before any obvious signs of mental health issues) I still suffered from social difficulties. This stemmed from sexual abuse as a child. As with many victims, I tended to box these up, pretending nothing was wrong. This ostridge mentality only exacerbates the problem and pushes it to the future. In my case it culminating in psychosis.

You can see that a simple dosage of rispiridone or aripripisone cannot and will not provide any long term solution to the problem

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@ mellifluous

Thank you for your eloquent response. You're absolutely correct. My intention was not to criticise or point fingers at those who rely on medication. I was simply speaking from my perspective.

Sure, trauma, bad experiences etc. can cause a chemical imbalance within the system. However, this could also perhaps be genetic? I still suspect that a great proportion of sufferers will belong to the former camp. Simply using pharmaceuticals in this case will not offer the patient a decent quality of life. Where things become unbearable and the patient loses total control then yes why not.... But only as a temporary measure.

I have personally been completely off the meds since the beginning of August. At the same time my psychologist has been pushing me to engage in more social interactions. This together with my therapy sessions has uncovered some interesting facts behind my previous anxiety and ackwardness.

On the whole weird beliefs and thoughts have been kept at bay, & I have been able to distinguish between unsubstantiated beliefs and more evidence based ones.

If I come up with some weird thoughts or beliefs in future, I'm sure you guys will let me know;-)

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PS guys. I'm Really lucky as I have a great therapist.

As a trauma usually results in various coping mechanism strategies, your personality - wittingly or unwittingly tends to split into different parts. It is the job of the therapist to unify these disparate parts through what is referred to as Schema therapy.

So what we are trying to do is change counter productive child strategies into a healthy adult whole.

Please ask if you have any further questions

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Greetings Steven,

 

I was diagnosed in 2003 with depression, and later that same year, I was re-diagnosed with bipolar I.  This this could get too long, and I do not want to bore you with my story at this time.  Suffice to say, I feel fortunate to have ran into your post.  Because, just two months ago, approximately, something happened that helped me to realize that I was not suffering from bipolar, rather, I have discovered that I am suffering from PTSD.  Like I said, it's a long story, of how I came to see this and I have not written it yet.

 

PTSD can not be healed with the synthetic drugs that they give us.  Myself?  Well, the medication challenge is a long story as well; through my own process of trial and error I have discovered that a small amount of ssri meds is slightly helpful.  I am however, quite weary of the medication classes that were designed for the treatment of schizophrenics and schizoaffective disorders.  I am not psychotic, I don't see things or hear things.  Nor am I bipolar, the shrinks are getting more and more confused, and my diagnosis, continues to get watered down.  I peeked at my file the other day, which I am now getting a copy of, and it said this: bipolar 1, (NOS) not otherwise specified, last manic episode unknown.

 

I have began two write about my memories that were traumatic to me.  For many years, I discounted, paid no attention, and basically avoided thinking or talking about these experiences.  Now they are all coming to the top... so to speak, I mean, they all want attention...

 

I can only do so much at a time.  And then, I must stop, for I often feel, when I am getting into very traumatic stuff, as I write, that I will end up in the hospital; the feelings that come up are un- explainable.  So, I just sit there and feel the feelings; and I do not try to figure it out with my mind.  That is to say, I do not try to heal the awful feelings that I'm having. 

 

After completing a story of trauma, I read it to a friend.  And, I was just writing this morning, that it seems when I do write a story down and read it to a trusted friend, it seems as though, I have dropped off of me just a little bit of the heaviness of depression that I carry around with me.

 

I don't know the ending of this.  It seems as though my mission for now is to take care of myself physically and mentally and spiritually the best that I know how.  That is to say I feel as though I am a soldier that needs bread and water and friends and other human needs and my job is to write what I remember, regardless of how I feel.

 

Doug

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Stevenbell, you have made a lot of blanket statements regarding medication vs. therapy. It doesn't have to be medication VERSUS therapy. Both can work together and often they make the best combination. 

 

Please don't assert that meds are only useful in the short term. Many people needs meds for a long time, or for life. That is the nature of having a relapsing condition. And there is nothing wrong with needing meds for a long time. 

 

I could use the same argument about therapy. I only went to therapy for a year, to help me deal with my depression. Maybe therapy is only useful in the short term? What if I told you therapy isn't necessary for long term treatment, and only should be used during acute times? Clearly, that argument is ridiculous. Well, so is your stance that meds are only necessary for a short period of time, or don't allow people to really deal with their issues. 

 

I need meds for the rest of my life. I got what I needed out of therapy for a year. Maybe I'll need therapy again, who knows. But don't dismiss medication. And certainly don't dismiss medication as some conspiracy by pharmaceutical companies. That's fear mongering and just plain isn't true. 

 

Like San said, this site is pro-treatment and pro-medication. Some people choose not to use therapy, some people choose not to use meds. I'll respect your choices if you respect that everyone has a different path of treatment. 

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If you feel comfort in being labeled bipolar, then that's great. As for me I simply wish to grow into a healthy individual.

 

Wow. Just, wow.

 

How do you feel about the treatment of people whose doctors have shoved them into boxes like "diabetes," or "congestive heart failure?" What is the underlying social dynamic that needs to be addressed in those cases?

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If you feel comfort in being labeled bipolar, then that's great. As for me I simply wish to grow into a healthy individual.

Wow. Just, wow.

How do you feel about the treatment of people whose doctors have shoved them into boxes like "diabetes," or "congestive heart failure?" What is the underlying social dynamic that needs to be addressed in those cases? Ha. Ah yes. Thank you, crtclms.

Just because our mental illnesses manifest in a way that doesn't seem tangible to many people does not mean our disease is any less physically based. Yes, trauma will contribute to/exacerbate our MIs, but for many of us, our wiring and chemistry is fucked on basic PHYSICAL levels. When I had cancer, I chose surgery and physical treatment to save my life- if I had just talked it out with a therapist, I would have been dead within five years.

Yes, some people with MIs are able to get by without medication. Some cannot. Yet we all want to be "healthy individuals" regardless of which words we choose to describe ourselves.

(Btw, I chose to go three decades without medical attention for my illness, and learned all sorts of horrible coping strategies because of that choice. Medication actually helped me get a handle on the endless cycling, delusions and psychosis to be able to learn new skills so that I can be off medication for the short term.)

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I see that I have opened up a can of worms here.

 

This was not my intention.  Yes we may need medication to redress the chemical inbalances within our bodies.  What I was proposing was that this should not be used as an excuse not to delve more deeply into reasons behind the "breakdown"

 

dedoubt - I am happy that you survived cancer.  This could not be said for Steve Jobs who was perhaps a bit more extreme in advocating self treatment.  That is not to say that positive self belief and faith that you are the master of your own destiny does not play a huge role.in determining both your health & the quality of your life.  Indeed, studies have shown that the success rate for cancer survivors with a positive outlook  is usually a lot higher.

 

The problem with medicine today is that it treats the effects of illness rather than focussing more on preventative measures ... I refer here to studies conducted by Aubrey De Grey.

 

Parapluie - in my case medication helped to stabilize my out of control delusions, so in that sense it had a role to play.  however, simply maintaining that pharmacological coating or barrier IN MY CASE did not help resolve underlying issues.

 

I am not pro or anti anything, as I feel that an all or nothing approach is never helpful.  If you guys want to be inspired by someone who recovered from szhizophrenia (she still hears voices) then please check out Eleanor Longden (PhD) - she now treats people in our condition & gave a TED talk not so long ago in Salford United Kingdom

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Crtclms - yeah in retrospect that statement I made was a little harsh. Again I was talking from my own experience. In the past I have used excuses for the way I was - " oh that is because I'm psychotic, or oh that's because I was abused as a child etc.". In my case this victim mentality disempowered me and was certainly not helpful.

Tony Robbins was quite useful for me

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