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13 meds.  Do you feel relatively stable?  Or are things still a pain in the ass?

 

Things are always a pain in the ass for me.

 

Yes, I am relatively stable, but I have good days and bad days still. 

 

I'm definitely not high functioning, but I can function enough to get by day-to-day.  I don't have the psychosis as much on the medication, so that has gotten better (although I do still have hallucinations every day, but they are just a nuisance more than anything now; they don't get in the way like they used to).

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I'm 50, and have been on meds since I was 24, with varied results. My current cocktail is in my signature. Some of those are for migraine. That is also true of the "shelved" medications. They sometimes come off the shelf. for migraine again.

 

I am moderately stable. If not for my headaches, I could work part-time. My husband does not think I am stable as I do.

 

We are about to do some major tweaks with my cocktail, dropping the Wellbutrin, and adding Pristiq or Vibyrd (sp.) Wheee

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50 has been a bigger deal to me than I expected it would. I think it is the sense that I am 99% for sure more than halfway through my life. 40 was not an issue for me at all, so I was taken aback at how "hard" I took it turning 50. I think about my age way more than I used to.

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I am almost 50.   Energizerhoney, I did get substantially worse when starting menopause, and I'm nowhere near done with that process.  However my pdoc says she's often seen people with MI get better after they're done with menopause-- that is, better than they were before it started-- and that post menopause can be a good time for many people mentally and emotionally, and that I should look forward to it.

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I am 54 and have been taking meds for about 14 years.  I was first dx'ed with MDD, and about 5 years ago that was changed to BP II.

 

I also have good and bad days like everyone else, but the meds keep me from having continuous bad days that last for years at a time.  I am stable and have been gainfully employed in a fairly stressful job for over six years.  My social life is nothing to brag about, though.  I figure if I can get to work almost every day and keep my bills paid, I cut myself a break over a lot of social engagements on top of working.  A lot of times the combination of the two is too much stress, and I now know that I need a lot of down time to keep from crashing.  I am my sole support, so work is really important.  Also, I like my job and the people I work with, so that satisfies a lot of my socializing needs.

 

The big advantage of being aware of my disease and being treated for it for so long is that I have learned the warning signs of a depressive episode so I can take action before it gets bad.  That's a huge improvement over what I experienced earlier in life when I didn't realize I was crazy.

 

As far as feeling like life is over once I hit 50, I don't feel that way at all.  My knees are a bit creaky, and I color my grey hair, but otherwise I still feel like the same old Catnapper.  I have found as I've gotten older that a lot of things that really stressed me out when I was younger don't bother me that much anymore since both the bad times and good times pass.  I had heavy periods my whole life, so menopause was fine with me.  I can't tell any difference on its effect on my mood.

 

I'm generally optimistic, but also fatalistic, since I firmly keep in the front of my mind that tomorrow isn't promised to any of us.  That forces me to mostly live in the moment, which I find contributes a great deal to a sense of contentment.  I hope today isn't my last day, but since no one gets out of here alive, I'm okay with the idea that it might be.  Part of that comes from previous bouts of suicidal ideation and being seconds away from ending it, so the idea of things coming to an end isn't that foreign to me, if that makes any sense. 

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First the disclaimer: I do not have a diagnosis on the Bipolar Spectrum,

 

I am just shy of 65 and have been on MI medication for +/- a decade.

 

Medication literally save my life and gave me both the desire and will to live life to its fullest. I do not always succeed, yet I have more positive days than negative at this time.

 

Life can be fulfilling and rewarding at any age and often medication is the cornerstone.

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I'm generally optimistic, but also fatalistic, since I firmly keep in the front of my mind that tomorrow isn't promised to any of us.  That forces me to mostly live in the moment, which I find contributes a great deal to a sense of contentment.  I hope today isn't my last day, but since no one gets out of here alive, I'm okay with the idea that it might be.  Part of that comes from previous bouts of suicidal ideation and being seconds away from ending it, so the idea of things coming to an end isn't that foreign to me, if that makes any sense. 

 

You're a smart cookie.

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