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Started a class, dropped because of stress


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Last week I started an EKG class (the strip that shows your heart action). It was 5 sessions, 5 hours each. I made it through 2 sessions and then the stress of studying for the test made me drop it. There was a test on week 3, and no matter how much I studied, I just couldnt learn it all. I went through RN school about 15 years ago and had to learn all of this then, While I dont remember much of it, I have had exposure to the material.

 

I am in the process of appealing my SSDI benefits, so it is probably a good thing I couldnt complete the class as it shows I cant handle stress.

 

I am sort of bummed out because I cant accomplist learning. I had sort of toyed with the idea of finishing my masters, slowly, while I am on disability, but it sounds like I shouldnt waste my money.

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I've been there. I know it's tough, but you have to protect your mental health first and foremost. Hopefully, you will some day get stable enough to be able to finish your Master's. No need to doom yourself already by saying that you'll never be able to do it. Just now is not the time.

 

Edit: Are you seeing a therapist? Perhaps you could work on some coping skills to learn to deal with stress.

Edited by jt07
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I am sorry to hear that you are bummed out--not remembering information is frustrating.  I also have a hard time retaining information, but fortunately my program involves mostly take home exams and papers, so I can refer to information rather than memorizing.  I'm sorry you're going through this. 

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I am doing my masters. I don't know about your subject, but I am handling mine, working from home part time, alright. I'd be screwed if I were doing my bachelors because I have no memory to do that kind of study anymore, but there are no quizzes or exams involved in the majority of post grad as far as I can tell. A close relative recently finished a masters in a health sciences field. All they did was research intensely and write a thesis. It was all done at home over a few years.

 

Masters programs are very different from undergrad programs. I'd say you would fare much better in post grad than undergrad. 

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I'm a little spaced but think I cane add my 2 to this thread.

I was studying to be a lawyer.I am a pol science bachelor.

I was 2 years into my studies,drinking socially,having friends,subscribing to TIME and

NEWSWEEK.I was into politics.I was radical.I was something.

 

midways through studies I got clinical depression.you guys know.that's why I'm here.

it turned to mania,turned to psychosis,hospitals,street drugs…….

 

well,you luckily aren;t taking this life killing path.

you have a wonderful future with or without class.

 

what you're going through is our normal.it sucks.

wishing you all the best.

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I am doing my masters. I don't know about your subject, but I am handling mine, working from home part time, alright. I'd be screwed if I were doing my bachelors because I have no memory to do that kind of study anymore, but there are no quizzes or exams involved in the majority of post grad as far as I can tell. A close relative recently finished a masters in a health sciences field. All they did was research intensely and write a thesis. It was all done at home over a few years.

 

Masters programs are very different from undergrad programs. I'd say you would fare much better in post grad than undergrad.

It depends on the subject, I imagine. Exams feature prominently in law school (one big exam at end of term and that's your grade), but only crop up in music grad at the beginning (entrance exams) and the end (master or doctorate comprehensive exams), save for a class here or there. I do agree that grad school is generally easier than undergrad, but I think part of that is thAt you're only studying something that you (hopefully) like. You also typically take fewer classes, which makes things easier. That is prolly the biggest thing of all. It took me four schools to get my undergrad degree. Second school I was at I only had 3 classes per term. My last semester at the fourth school, I had 9 classes and then Dropped one, not because it was hard, but because it was sucking up 3-4 hours of my time that I didn't have to spare on a course that I didn't need. And I also had a mono relapse, so I just had to let it go. Guess which school was harder? LOL. Most of my regular grad school courses were independent study with various profs. I'm not sure whether I got letter grades for those. I think maybe was just pass-fail. ?That's another thing that makes it easier. My advice to savannah would be to try to get stable on meds and then talk to profs about the MA program you're interested in and see if the kind of schedule and workload would be doable. And even if you miss a term here or there, it's not the end of the world. I had to take two leave of absences during my MA, but still got all my coursework done by taking some overloads.
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Wow, to me, law school was way harder than undergraduate, and I went to a very good college (and law school). Much, much harder. But I felt like I understood how to think deeply (not deep thoughts) after I went.

 

My Constitutional Law class was a full year class with one 6 hour exam at the end of the year, and was open book (so super hard).

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Wow, to me, law school was way harder than undergraduate, and I went to a very good college (and law school). Much, much harder. But I felt like I understood how to think deeply (not deep thoughts) after I went.

 

My Constitutional Law class was a full year class with one 6 hour exam at the end of the year, and was open book (so super hard).

I think your experience is more typical than mine. I did know two other people in my section who also felt that law school was dramatically easier than undergrad, though.
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As a medical student with bipolar, I've come pretty close to taking a year out/dropping out completely (in fact, most of the psychiatrists I've seen recommended it). 

If you need to pull out, you need to pull out. There's always going to be another chance to do the course again, if it's going to push you over the edge then it's not worth it. 

I second the ideas that post-grad (thesis) work can be a lot more mental illness-friendly than undergrad, not having a constant stream of exams relieves a lot of the pressure. Vocational training stuff (med, law, etc) however....  <_<

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Usually, for post-graduate work, there are a couple of years of classes (with exams and homework) and a big exam and then you move on to research and writing a thesis. At least that is how it is for the Ph.D. For the Master's, I believe that there is also some classwork and a thesis to write (although there are programs without the theisis). Technically, there were no requirements to take classes in my program, but you had to take and pass the Comprehensive Exam so unless you were a genius, I don't know how you could do it without taking classes.

And, yes, law school is much more difficult than undergraduate if only due to the teaching method which is quite foreign to most students (Socratic Method).

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Masters degrees for english, fine arts, language studies, history, literature etc... are very different from law/medical school. They are much easier than the latter. If my fine arts masters were as difficult as law or medical school, I wouldn't be doing it. Period. I am in awe of you folk who are doing it! *bows*

 

I am sorry, I should have specified when I mentioned health sciences because I was not referring to medical school at all. What  I was talking about was an unrelated degree which I would elaborate on but I can't really due to respecting the privacy of the person I am speaking of.

 

Again... wow at you folk who are doing or did law and medicine. Wow. 

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I had a better time at University, teachers did appreciate me much more (maybe because I had almost always 18-19-20 on 20) . :D

But I did spend most time in a hypomanic state at University.  :D  :lol:  Teachers did also appreciate me not only due high grads, but also  because they know about my disability.   :)

 

I would also like to thank my wonder med. at that moment of time; Abilify.

 

Sorry too hear you have dropped you're class!  :o It's difficult with Bipolar and/or psychosis to finish school!!! Also the medication can decrease focus to study!!! (In my case it did increase my focus)

Edited by InnovatingProfessor²
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Was it only the stress (NOT minimizing stress, its one of my biggest triggers) that got to you or were you in a depressed state along with it by chance? With anxiety on top of it I'm guessing also?

I can't speak for you of course, but I'm also an RN. There are refresher RN classes out there for those who have been out of practice for a long time. That may be an option for you in the future. I've been an RN for about 11 years now. I had to find my nitch in nursing (which is not med/surg!)

Another option that may help give you a boost of confidence is learning arrhythmia's is online...YouTube, etc. A LOT of ppl dropped out of the EKG, ACLS, etc classes I took. They are very fast paced as you know. Wham bam learn it now!

Edited by Energizerhoney
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