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Types Of Headaches - Lots Of Info

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Posted by: kellylynne Posted on: 01/15/05 at 9:21pm

there is a place around where I live called MHNI - Michigan Head Pain & Neurological Institute. It's like, the best there is... which is WHY, they don't take ANY insurance! (what a crock, huh?)..so because I couldn't make an appointment, the nice lady on the phone still sent me this huge info packet, and video. I thought I should share some of the information here, in hopes it could be of use. 

Types of headaches - (which do you suffer from?)

Analgesic Rebound Headaches - 

A condition in which escalating and increasingly frequent headaches occur on a background of increasingly freequent use of analegsics. (I believe this is all over the country stuff....tylonal, motrin, etc.) As more and more medication is taken to control the headache, the medication serves to worsen the headache condition, causing a self-sustaining and predictable medication-headache cycle. This happens when the over-the-counter stuff is used more than 2-3 days each week on a regular basis. The rapid intensification of head pain when the overused medication is taken away or suddenly withdrawn is the hallmark of the rebound headache.

Rebound headaches can also occur with use of popular anti-migraine medications such as Imitrex, Zomig, Relpax, Frova and Amerge. 

Cures: Most people who develope analegesic rebound will experience a significant reduction in their headache frequency, intensity, and duration, after the overused medication is withdrawn. Migraine preventatives may also help in this case.

Menstrual Migraines - 

Menstrual migraine occurs in approx 25-60% of females. It is generally defined as migraine occurring on the first day (give or take 2 days) of the menstrual period, and may last as long as 4 days after the menses. Migraine that occurs only at the menstrual period, is called True Menstrual Migraine, and migraine that occurs at other times in the menstrual period month is called Menstrually-Related Migraine. And finally, Premenstrual Migraine is that which occurs 2 to 7 days before the onset of menstrual flow. 

Treatment - Menstrual migraine can be particularly treatment-resistant depending on menstrual regularity, duration of menses, coexistant illness, fluctuations in mood, and sleep impairment. Each patient requires a different approach. The first line of therapy involves addressing the acute headache attack and may take the form of simple abortives such as acetaminophen, naproxen, codeine, or combined products including Excedrin, Midrin, Fiorinal, Tylenol 3 as well as ergotamine-related compounds and triptans (Imtrex, Zomig, Maxalt, Relpax, Frova and Amerge.) Other illnesses which may be present need to be addressed as well, such as anxiety, depression, or sleep disturbance. 

Childhood Migraine - 

Adolescents and children who experience recurrent headaches require special medical attention, since there are unique differences in the causes. The characteristics of childhood migraine are similar to adult, but abdominal pain and temporary mood or behavioral changes are more common in children. Children sometimes experience symptoms such as vomiting, dizziness, and confusion, which are typical of migraine attacks, but occur without developing a headache; these are called migraine equivalents. 

Migraine equivalents in childhood can present episodes or spells of staggering, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, irritability, personality change, anxiety, and/or blurred vision, which are not associated with headache. 

4 equivalents that are most specific in migraine are, abdominal migraine (recurring bouts of stomach pain), cyclic vomiting (recurring bouts of vomiting), benign paroxysmal vertigo (recurring attacks of dizziness) and benign torticollis (recurring episodes of wry or twisted neck). 

Treatment - Many children respond well to non-medication treatment approaches. Treatment includes biofeedback and relaxation therapy, life style adjustments including a migraine diet, maintaining a regular routine and schedule, exercising, and avoiding known headache triggers. Medications should be avoided in children, as possible. 

Depression and Headache - 

There is an increased risk of major depression in migraine sufferers, between 3.1 and 3.6 times the rate for those without migraine. For example, a recent survey of over 1000 young adults in the Detroit area found that 34.4% of those with migraine had at least one major depressive episode, compared to 10.4% for those without migraine. 

Medication - this type of headache is usually treated with anti-depressants. 

Non-Drug Treatment Alternatives - 

Drugs are not the only means of effectively treating head pain. For many people, the consistent practice of behavioral methods can reduce the intensity and frequency of headache. Also behavioral treatment may help in creating a sense of well-being, coping with the stress created by the headache, or helping the headache sufferer to function. 

Biofeedback, relaxation training, and cognitive-behavior therapy have demonstrated their effectiveness in over 25 years of rigorous research and well over 100 experimental studies in these combined areas. Aerobic exercise, sleep regulation, dietary regulation and smoking cessation make sound physiological sense and are supported by clinical experience. 

Cluster Headaches - Cluster headaches are considered to be the most severe headache known to humans. Treatment of cluster is difficult and sufferors often need to see headache specialists to get proper therapy. A recent study has shown that it takes an average of 6.6 years for a cluster patient to be diagnosed correctly. Patients with cluster headaches usually experience severe one-sided headaches in or around the eye that will last from 15 to 180 minutes without treatment. The headache is commonly associated with eye tearing, eyelid drooping, eye redness or nasal congestion or discharge on the side of the head pain. During a cluster attack, patients cannot and do not want to remain still because doing so seems to worsen the pain. Subsequently, a cluster patient will typically pace the floor and even bang their head against the wall to distract and attempt to alleviate the pain. 

What causes cluster headaches? The exact cause is unknown. What we do know, is that the cluster headache evolves from activation of the trigeminal nerve and autonomic nervous system. When the trigeminal nerve is activated, it causes pain in and around the eye. When the autonomic nervous system is activated it produces the associated symptoms that come along with a cluster headache. 

Treating Cluster Headaches - All cluster headache patients require treatment. The treatment can be divided into three classes: 1. Abortive or acute therapy (treatment given at the time of an attack); 2. transitional therapy, which can be considered intermittent or short-term preventive treatment; 3. Preventive therapy which consists of daily medication aimed at decreasing the frequency, intensity, and duration of cluster headache attacks. 

Abortive Therapy - The goal of abortive therapy for cluster headache is fast, effective and consistent relief. Because a cluster headache is relatively short in duration, the abortives should work within 10-15 minutes to be considered adequate therapy. 

Some medicines used for abortive therapy are Sumatriptan, Oxygen (100% oxygen given via face mask), zolmitriptan, dihydroergotamine, Olanzapine. 

Transitional therapy - Steroids, Naratriptan, and Occipital nerve blockade. 

Preventative Therapy - Verapamil, topiramite, lithium carbonate, Methysergide, Valproic acid, Naratriptan, Melatonin.

There are also some new types of surgical treatment for the cluster headache - Radiofrequency thermocoagulation, glycerol trigeminal rhizotomy, trigeminal nerve root section, and microvascular decompression. (i didn't want to type up all those descriptions, so if you're interested, at least you have the names so you can look them up.)

Physical therapy can also help to prevent all types of headaches, as well as sleep therapy for those with sleep disorders which may be causing the head pain. 

Posted by: PillPopper Posted on: 01/17/05 at 2:39am

did you ever hear about the Michigan Headache Clinic in Lansing, MI?  My Neurologist wants to refer me to them within the next couple of months if my headaches/facial pain doesn't improve.  According to their website www.michiganheadache.com, they do take an assortment of health insurance plans. 

Posted by: kellylynne Posted on: 01/17/05 at 1:46pm

on 01/17/05 at 2:39am, PillPopper wrote:did you ever hear about the Michigan Headache Clinic in Lansing, MI?  My Neurologist wants to refer me to them within the next couple of months if my headaches/facial pain doesn't improve.  According to their website www.michiganheadache.com, they do take an assortment of health insurance plans. 

I have heard of them! Unfortunately, that's waaaay too far for me to drive for appointments. If I was at my last resort, I would maybe do it, but the doc I found here is pretty good. MHNI is just nationally acclaimed because they do like a MILLION tests on you in your first visit... such as MRI, EKG, and a bunch of other things you can only get done through a hospital. Basically, they don't speculate, they just FIND OUT for sure what's going on. I have a lot of info from them, which is why I posted it.  Let me know how your appointment goes at the place in Lansing, i'd be interested to know what the treatment plan is like. 

Posted by: roxyhead Posted on: 01/18/05 at 6:26pm

on 01/15/05 at 9:21pm, kellylynne wrote:

Childhood Migraine - 

Adolescents and children who experience recurrent headaches require special medical attention, since there are unique differences in the causes. The characteristics of childhood migraine are similar to adult, but abdominal pain and temporary mood or behavioral changes are more common in children. Children sometimes experience symptoms such as vomiting, dizziness, and confusion, which are typical of migraine attacks, but occur without developing a headache; these are called migraine equivalents. 

Migraine equivalents in childhood can present episodes or spells of staggering, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, irritability, personality change, anxiety, and/or blurred vision, which are not associated with headache. 

In a child/adolescent, how would this be differentiated by pain-predominated IBS, when you've got abdominal pain, dizziness, nausea, feeling faint, and irritability?  Do the abdominal symptoms disappear when the head migraines start? 

As far as I understand it, with some kids, they get the symptoms, but not the migraine, or the symptoms, then the migraine without the symptoms...or the migraine AND the symptoms. If the child is having symptoms from IBS that are similiar to this...it could be just that - similiar symptoms, but the general diagnosis is actually IBS, not migraine, and vice versa. If you know someone, or have a child, who is going through this...the best suggestion I have, would be to see a doctor, so you can find out exactly what's going on. 

Posted by: smooth.kriminal Posted on: 04/07/05 at 11:41pm

Menstrual migraine occurs in approx 25-60% of females.

that's a large percentage range to approximate. lol

very good info. i appreciate your taking the time to type it all up.

Edited by groovyone

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Great post ha.

Today, despite the toll headaches still take on millions of people around the world, we have made enormous progress in treating them. New medications, combined with nondrug therapies, are preventing, stopping or managing some of the toughest headaches around.

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I have one for ya- Hemi cranial continua- (along with migraine- very similar symptoms) that only seems to go away with indomethacin. Apparently it's rare. I hadn't head of it until late January. It is a severe headache on one side of the head, generating from the neck, to the back of the head,to the top and into the eye sockets. I have had it 24-7 for six months. I saw a neurologist, had MRIs and MRAs done, everything was normal, but I still had this intense pain. The neurologist just threw up his hands. I eventually went to a pain clinic where I saw a DDS and he figured out what the problems...prescribed indocin, which works very well although I get a few breakthrough headaches, but I had to take a preventive, and none of them worked. I was just recently taken off of neurontin- about a week ago, and I am still feeling withdrawal symptoms. I am having to schedule a Facet block in the c-3-4 vertebra, to get rid of it once and for all, because I have had such horrible side effects from the preventives. Does Indocin cause rebound headaches? I take Nexium for the possible stomach problems, and always take Indocin with food plus I have to take a dose of blood pressure meds for the side effects. There is no known cause for this headache, but they theorize it may be from a past head injury. Like most people I have been conked on my head so many times , i can't count them all. I guess one of them was the culprit. I think there is a connection to whiplash as well- which I have had for nearly 40 years.

Topic Summary

Posted by: kellylynne Posted on: 01/15/05 at 9:21pm

there is a place around where I live called MHNI - Michigan Head Pain & Neurological Institute. It's like, the best there is... which is WHY, they don't take ANY insurance! (what a crock, huh?)..so because I couldn't make an appointment, the nice lady on the phone still sent me this huge info packet, and video. I thought I should share some of the information here, in hopes it could be of use.

Types of headaches - (which do you suffer from?)

Analgesic Rebound Headaches -

A condition in which escalating and increasingly frequent headaches occur on a background of increasingly freequent use of analegsics. (I believe this is all over the country stuff....tylonal, motrin, etc.) As more and more medication is taken to control the headache, the medication serves to worsen the headache condition, causing a self-sustaining and predictable medication-headache cycle. This happens when the over-the-counter stuff is used more than 2-3 days each week on a regular basis. The rapid intensification of head pain when the overused medication is taken away or suddenly withdrawn is the hallmark of the rebound headache.

Rebound headaches can also occur with use of popular anti-migraine medications such as Imitrex, Zomig, Relpax, Frova and Amerge.

Cures: Most people who develope analegesic rebound will experience a significant reduction in their headache frequency, intensity, and duration, after the overused medication is withdrawn. Migraine preventatives may also help in this case.

Menstrual Migraines -

Menstrual migraine occurs in approx 25-60% of females. It is generally defined as migraine occurring on the first day (give or take 2 days) of the menstrual period, and may last as long as 4 days after the menses. Migraine that occurs only at the menstrual period, is called True Menstrual Migraine, and migraine that occurs at other times in the menstrual period month is called Menstrually-Related Migraine. And finally, Premenstrual Migraine is that which occurs 2 to 7 days before the onset of menstrual flow.

Treatment - Menstrual migraine can be particularly treatment-resistant depending on menstrual regularity, duration of menses, coexistant illness, fluctuations in mood, and sleep impairment. Each patient requires a different approach. The first line of therapy involves addressing the acute headache attack and may take the form of simple abortives such as acetaminophen, naproxen, codeine, or combined products including Excedrin, Midrin, Fiorinal, Tylenol 3 as well as ergotamine-related compounds and triptans (Imtrex, Zomig, Maxalt, Relpax, Frova and Amerge.) Other illnesses which may be present need to be addressed as well, such as anxiety, depression, or sleep disturbance.

Childhood Migraine -

Adolescents and children who experience recurrent headaches require special medical attention, since there are unique differences in the causes. The characteristics of childhood migraine are similar to adult, but abdominal pain and temporary mood or behavioral changes are more common in children. Children sometimes experience symptoms such as vomiting, dizziness, and confusion, which are typical of migraine attacks, but occur without developing a headache; these are called migraine equivalents.

Migraine equivalents in childhood can present episodes or spells of staggering, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, irritability, personality change, anxiety, and/or blurred vision, which are not associated with headache.

4 equivalents that are most specific in migraine are, abdominal migraine (recurring bouts of stomach pain), cyclic vomiting (recurring bouts of vomiting), benign paroxysmal vertigo (recurring attacks of dizziness) and benign torticollis (recurring episodes of wry or twisted neck).

Treatment - Many children respond well to non-medication treatment approaches. Treatment includes biofeedback and relaxation therapy, life style adjustments including a migraine diet, maintaining a regular routine and schedule, exercising, and avoiding known headache triggers. Medications should be avoided in children, as possible.

Depression and Headache -

There is an increased risk of major depression in migraine sufferers, between 3.1 and 3.6 times the rate for those without migraine. For example, a recent survey of over 1000 young adults in the Detroit area found that 34.4% of those with migraine had at least one major depressive episode, compared to 10.4% for those without migraine.

Medication - this type of headache is usually treated with anti-depressants.

Non-Drug Treatment Alternatives -

Drugs are not the only means of effectively treating head pain. For many people, the consistent practice of behavioral methods can reduce the intensity and frequency of headache. Also behavioral treatment may help in creating a sense of well-being, coping with the stress created by the headache, or helping the headache sufferer to function.

Biofeedback, relaxation training, and cognitive-behavior therapy have demonstrated their effectiveness in over 25 years of rigorous research and well over 100 experimental studies in these combined areas. Aerobic exercise, sleep regulation, dietary regulation and smoking cessation make sound physiological sense and are supported by clinical experience.

Cluster Headaches - Cluster headaches are considered to be the most severe headache known to humans. Treatment of cluster is difficult and sufferors often need to see headache specialists to get proper therapy. A recent study has shown that it takes an average of 6.6 years for a cluster patient to be diagnosed correctly. Patients with cluster headaches usually experience severe one-sided headaches in or around the eye that will last from 15 to 180 minutes without treatment. The headache is commonly associated with eye tearing, eyelid drooping, eye redness or nasal congestion or discharge on the side of the head pain. During a cluster attack, patients cannot and do not want to remain still because doing so seems to worsen the pain. Subsequently, a cluster patient will typically pace the floor and even bang their head against the wall to distract and attempt to alleviate the pain.

What causes cluster headaches? The exact cause is unknown. What we do know, is that the cluster headache evolves from activation of the trigeminal nerve and autonomic nervous system. When the trigeminal nerve is activated, it causes pain in and around the eye. When the autonomic nervous system is activated it produces the associated symptoms that come along with a cluster headache.

Treating Cluster Headaches - All cluster headache patients require treatment. The treatment can be divided into three classes: 1. Abortive or acute therapy (treatment given at the time of an attack); 2. transitional therapy, which can be considered intermittent or short-term preventive treatment; 3. Preventive therapy which consists of daily medication aimed at decreasing the frequency, intensity, and duration of cluster headache attacks.

Abortive Therapy - The goal of abortive therapy for cluster headache is fast, effective and consistent relief. Because a cluster headache is relatively short in duration, the abortives should work within 10-15 minutes to be considered adequate therapy.

Some medicines used for abortive therapy are Sumatriptan, Oxygen (100% oxygen given via face mask), zolmitriptan, dihydroergotamine, Olanzapine.

Transitional therapy - Steroids, Naratriptan, and Occipital nerve blockade.

Preventative Therapy - Verapamil, topiramite, lithium carbonate, Methysergide, Valproic acid, Naratriptan, Melatonin.

There are also some new types of surgical treatment for the cluster headache - Radiofrequency thermocoagulation, glycerol trigeminal rhizotomy, trigeminal nerve root section, and microvascular decompression. (i didn't want to type up all those descriptions, so if you're interested, at least you have the names so you can look them up.)

Physical therapy can also help to prevent all types of headaches, as well as sleep therapy for those with sleep disorders which may be causing the head pain.

Posted by: PillPopper Posted on: 01/17/05 at 2:39am

did you ever hear about the Michigan Headache Clinic in Lansing, MI? My Neurologist wants to refer me to them within the next couple of months if my headaches/facial pain doesn't improve. According to their website www.michiganheadache.com, they do take an assortment of health insurance plans.

Posted by: kellylynne Posted on: 01/17/05 at 1:46pm

on 01/17/05 at 2:39am, PillPopper wrote:did you ever hear about the Michigan Headache Clinic in Lansing, MI? My Neurologist wants to refer me to them within the next couple of months if my headaches/facial pain doesn't improve. According to their website www.michiganheadache.com, they do take an assortment of health insurance plans.

I have heard of them! Unfortunately, that's waaaay too far for me to drive for appointments. If I was at my last resort, I would maybe do it, but the doc I found here is pretty good. MHNI is just nationally acclaimed because they do like a MILLION tests on you in your first visit... such as MRI, EKG, and a bunch of other things you can only get done through a hospital. Basically, they don't speculate, they just FIND OUT for sure what's going on. I have a lot of info from them, which is why I posted it. Let me know how your appointment goes at the place in Lansing, i'd be interested to know what the treatment plan is like.

Posted by: roxyhead Posted on: 01/18/05 at 6:26pm

on 01/15/05 at 9:21pm, kellylynne wrote:

Childhood Migraine -

Adolescents and children who experience recurrent headaches require special medical attention, since there are unique differences in the causes. The characteristics of childhood migraine are similar to adult, but abdominal pain and temporary mood or behavioral changes are more common in children. Children sometimes experience symptoms such as vomiting, dizziness, and confusion, which are typical of migraine attacks, but occur without developing a headache; these are called migraine equivalents.

Migraine equivalents in childhood can present episodes or spells of staggering, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, irritability, personality change, anxiety, and/or blurred vision, which are not associated with headache.

In a child/adolescent, how would this be differentiated by pain-predominated IBS, when you've got abdominal pain, dizziness, nausea, feeling faint, and irritability? Do the abdominal symptoms disappear when the head migraines start?

As far as I understand it, with some kids, they get the symptoms, but not the migraine, or the symptoms, then the migraine without the symptoms...or the migraine AND the symptoms. If the child is having symptoms from IBS that are similiar to this...it could be just that - similiar symptoms, but the general diagnosis is actually IBS, not migraine, and vice versa. If you know someone, or have a child, who is going through this...the best suggestion I have, would be to see a doctor, so you can find out exactly what's going on.

Posted by: smooth.kriminal Posted on: 04/07/05 at 11:41pm

Menstrual migraine occurs in approx 25-60% of females.

that's a large percentage range to approximate. lol

very good info. i appreciate your taking the time to type it all up.

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Ive been getting headachles lately and they seem to be day in and day out, and im just now noticing them more and more than i have last months or a few months ago. They seem to be in the area of my temples and more along the side of my head, and i didnt know if they would be from the weather changing, sinuses, stress or allergies. I thought theyd be from stress because exam week is next week but they just dont seem to go away and i wasnt sure what causes them. So if you could please help me out i would appreaciate it. Thank you

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I have had the same problem for about a year now, and I'm in grade 11 currently. It is extremely exhausting. I recommend you see a family doctor ASAP, because I put mine off as long as I could and they've been getting progressively worse.

If you have tension aches around your head, take some eucalyptus oil or even Vicks rub and massage it along your temples and the back of your neck- it didn't help my pain much but it certainly eased the stress of it because of it's cool sensation.

Try to drink lots of water- it could be dehydration without you even knowing.

Certain foods can trigger headaches, such as cheese, bananas and mushrooms... So maybe track your diet.

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I am going to try that, I have got some oil called Hammer Head. Also another one called Grateful head. I got them through Aromatic Apothecary.

I'm going to get off the Amitripilene and see if the oils will work better. 

Thanks.

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6 hours ago, pain said:

I am going to try that, I have got some oil called Hammer Head. Also another one called Grateful head. I got them through Aromatic Apothecary.

I'm going to get off the Amitripilene and see if the oils will work better. 

Thanks.

A small hint of lavender helps my migraines also.  I have an ice pack with a slight smell of lavender, and when I use it I can feel it starting to lessen the headache a little.  Not completely, but it jump starts getting rid of the pain.

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