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I couldn't find a good recipe for multi-grain breakfast porridge (hot cereal). So I made one up. :)

 

The month of December is when I try to run out my grains/beans jars so I know I've started relatively fresh in the new year. I had a few handfuls of things and here's what I came up with.  

 

It's a HUGE batch and makes at LEAST 12 servings of 1 cup each. I started freezing some in my muffin tin to make "pucks" that are heat and serve for fast weekday breakfasts. Once I get the first batch out of the freezer, I should be able to tell total quantity.

 

I call this "Winging It Whole Grain Porridge" 

 

  • 1.00 cup(s), brown rice 
  • 0.50 cup(s), Oats Steel Cut
  • 0.50 cup(s), Yellow Corn Meal
  • 0.50 cup, Amaranth
  • 1.00 cup, Buckwheat
  • 7.00 cup(s), Water - Municipal
  • 4.00 tbsp, Chia Seeds
  • 156.00 g, Craisins (Grams)
  • 1.00 cup (30g), Chopped Walnuts
  • 16.00 oz (1 cup), Unsweetened Organic Soy Milk
  • 3.00 tbsp, Vanilla extract
  • 1.00 tsp, Salt
  • 0.50 Tsp, Cinnamon
  • 0.25 tsp, Spices - Nutmeg, ground

I thought it tasted a little too salty, but a bit more vanilla took care of that. The sweetness comes from the craisins, otherwise no added sugar.

 

All the grains start uncooked.

 

Add water plus rice plus oatmeal to a large pot. Cover and bring to a boil, then turn heat down to low. Simmer covered 15 minutes. Add corn meal, amaranth, and buckwheat. Mix well to get rid of any lumps. Bring back to boil, then turn heat down to low. Simmer covered for 15 more minutes or until grains are soft. Add chia seeds and soy milk, stir well. Rummage around in the cupboard for other add ins... (about 3 minutes to allow chia seeds to absorb some liquid). Add salt, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, cranberries, and walnuts.

 

And for the curious, here's the nutrition information from My Fitness Pal:

Nutrition Facts Servings 12.0 Amount Per Serving calories 321 % Daily Value * Total Fat 11 g 16 % Saturated Fat 1 g 6 % Monounsaturated Fat 1 g Polyunsaturated Fat 6 g Trans Fat 0 g Cholesterol 0 mg 0 % Sodium 222 mg 9 % Potassium 223 mg 6 % Total Carbohydrate 40 g 13 % Dietary Fiber 8 g 30 % Sugars 10 g   Protein 9 g 17 % Vitamin A 3 % Vitamin C 1 % Calcium 6 % Iron 13 %

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Flash, I generally buy tamari sauce instead of soy sauce.  Is there much of a flavor difference?

 

olga

I use tamari for some things. It's my generalist soy sauce. I tend to use pearl river bridge light (thin) soy sauce for Chinese. I sometimes use it for Korean as well, but I'll use a Korean soy sauce when given the chance. I just tend to run out of Korean soy sauce and it only gets replenished when I go to the Korean store, which is a little out there at 20-25 minutes away. The Chinese, Korean, and Japanese soy sauces are all somewhat different. You would not want Chinese soy sauce served with your sushi, for instance. But in recipes with lots of different sauce ingredients they become more easily interchangeable (but still different). Exceptions would be the specialty soy sauces, particularly dark Chinese (black or double black), sweet soy sauce (thai), dark soy sauce (thai), and so on. Those do not have substitutions really. Reduced sodium or "lite" soy sauce can be used interchangeably with Japanese soy sauce without worries in most things. Anyway, if I could only have one soy sauce, it would probably be tamari.

P.S. For fish sauce, I use Red Boat 40°No. It's by far the best. Before that I used three crabs brand, which is good.

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Speaking of soy sauce...

I made dead simple big batch dinner tonight... Peanut sauce with frozen mixed vegetables over brown rice. This made 6 servings of 3/4-1 c brown rice + 3/4-1 c vegetables and sauce

2/3 cup water

1/2 cup natural peanut butter

2 tablespoons rice vinegar, (see Ingredient note) or white vinegar

4 teaspoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

4 teaspoons honey

4 teaspoons minced ginger (I used a couple tablespoons of crystalized ginger chopped up, and should have used less honey)

4 cloves garlic, minced

Red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper (optional) to taste

2 12oz bags frozen mixed vegetables (I used carrots, corn, peas, green beans but you could also use the California Medley with broccoli, cauliflower, and carrots)

2 c brown rice

4 c water

3-4 green onions (optional), sliced green tops only (add chopped white parts to the peanut sauce if desired)

Put water and rice in sauce pan and bring to a boil. Turn to low and let cook until there are holes in the rice and all water is absorbed (about 40 minutes total).

While the rice is cooking...

Heat a large skillet over medium heat while you...

Whisk together water, peanut butter, rice vinegar, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic, and red pepper/cayenne if using.

Pour peanut sauce into the skillet.

Add the frozen vegetables and bring to a simmer while you wash the dishes.

When the sauce has thickened, put 3/4 to 1 cup of cooked brown rice in a bowl and top with 3/4 to 1 cup vegetables and sauce.

Garnish with scallions if desired.

Looks like a good peanut sauce. For a bottled version for salads, try Gado Gado Indonesian salad dressing from Kokita. It's very simple (not nearly as zippy as the one above), but I like it on cucumber and tomato salad considering I can just shake and pour. I used to be better about making my own salad dressings, but not so much recently. I do "make my own" with flavored balsamic vinegars and flavored olive oils, though. I really like basil olive oil with strawberry balsamic. Blood orange and chocolate is also nice. Edited by Flash

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I need a good recipe for a one-pot meal. I was thinking Yankee pot roast or beef stew, or something along those lines.

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I tried woo's peanut sauce vegetables over rice recipe. If you have it, adding a spoonful of coconut oil to the peanut sauce might not be a bad addition. I thought about it, but didn't.

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Extra saturated fat can't be bad (especially since it's been exonerated). Mmm.

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Does one pot mean only one pot can be used during cooking? Because this recipe requires you boil bacon for 5 minutes in a small saucepan. I know, it sounds gross, but this is SUCH a good recipe. So just in case you mean it has to *end up* in one pot:

 

Spinach and Chickpeas with Bacon

 

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Spinach-and-Chick-Peas-with-Bacon-103070

 

It has four strips of bacon, so not a ton of meat. And add more spinach if you want, it's hard to overdo it.

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I made these lovely pan-fried boneless pork chops with a recipe from Allrecipes, Orange Pork. The sauce is made of soy and orange juice, and a little corn starch. I served it over steamed rice, the sauce goes so well. Not an Asian dish, but Asian flavors. So yummy. And fast. This is definitely going into the rotation.

 

This reminded me of another recipe I decided to buy the ingredients for next we go shopping. It's pork tenderloin wrapped in sage and prosciutto. Sometimes I cook it resting on fruit, the most successful was on a bed of figs, split, cut face up. I serve this with rice, too. Really easy to make, and elegant. I'd serve it to guests, if such a thing were ever to happen in my house.

 

I've always been cautious about making peanut sauce for who knows what reason.

 

 

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Speaking of soy sauce... 

 

I made dead simple big batch dinner tonight... Peanut sauce with frozen mixed vegetables over brown rice. This made 6 servings of 3/4-1 c brown rice + 3/4-1 c vegetables and sauce

 

2/3 cup water

1/2 cup natural peanut butter

2 tablespoons rice vinegar, (see Ingredient note) or white vinegar

4 teaspoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

4 teaspoons honey

4 teaspoons minced ginger (I used a couple tablespoons of crystalized ginger chopped up, and should have used less honey)

4 cloves garlic, minced

Red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper (optional) to taste

 

2  12oz bags frozen mixed vegetables (I used carrots, corn, peas, green beans but you could also use the California Medley with broccoli, cauliflower, and carrots)

 

2 c brown rice

4 c water

 

3-4 green onions (optional), sliced green tops only (add chopped white parts to the peanut sauce if desired)

 

Put water and rice in sauce pan and bring to a boil. Turn to low and let cook until there are holes in the rice and all water is absorbed (about 40 minutes total).

 

While the rice is cooking...

Heat a large skillet over medium heat while you...

Whisk together water, peanut butter, rice vinegar, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic, and red pepper/cayenne if using. 

Pour peanut sauce into the skillet.

Add the frozen vegetables and bring to a simmer while you wash the dishes.

When the sauce has thickened, put 3/4 to 1 cup of cooked brown rice in a bowl and top with 3/4 to 1 cup vegetables and sauce.

Garnish with scallions if desired.

 

I'll be over for dinner.

 

I'd like to share a ridiculously simple recipe for a roast chicken. Pseudopod turned me on to it: while I used to season, garlic, add veg to the pan, and otherwise stuff the bird with lemons and onions, this makes a much nicer bird. So tender and so easy. Basically, you just dry the chicken thoroughly and rain salt over it. Put it in the oven alone and do not open the door until it's done cooking. I follow the cooking time listed on the package. 

 

My own addition is to carefully brush the salt away from the skin, avoiding dropping it into the pan juices. I then make a pan sauce or gravy from the juices - typically with rosemary, lemon juice, pepper, and a bit of butter. So good and so easy.

 

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/my-favorite-simple-roast-chicken-231348

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I made a fantastic pork tenderloin last night, the best I've ever made. It was SO good, it easily out-classed the sage a prosciutto wrapped tenderloin I made last week. .....

 

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That looks really good. And easy is always appreciated.

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You can use the same method with this sauce. Just sprinkle the pork with salt and pepper in this case. Reduce the wine by half, then whisk in the remaining ingredients. Cook until thickened.

1/4 cup dry white wine

1/2 cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill

Adapted from Martha Stewart: http://www.marthastewart.com/318298/sauteed-chicken-in-mustard-cream-sauce

Edited by Flash

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I made these buckwheat buttermilk pancakes this morning, subbing canola oil for butter.

 

They are super tasty.

 

I had kasha (toasted buckwheat) on hand and didn't see any buckwheat flour at my regular grocery store, so I threw the kasha in the food processor for about 8 minutes. I still had about 1/3 cup of chunks that were too big to use without making the batter all crunchy, so I added in 2/3 cup white whole wheat flour to make up the difference.

 

Pancakes freeze well, too, and you can reheat them in the toaster or in a pan with a smidge of butter or oil, so I like that this recipe is pretty big. The author says 4 generous servings. I got about 15 4" diameter pancakes out of it.

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Made this Easy Garlic Chicken recipe that was really tasty and easy. It called for 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts, and while I expected the packet I opened to have 4, it only had two. I went ahead and made the sauce for 4 anyway, as they were such large breasts.

 

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts

one T olive oil

4 minced garlic cloves

4 T of brown sugar (I used 2 dark, 2 light)

 

Preheat oven to 450....

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^^^reminds me of a recipe I made:

Sometimes I just make up recipes on the fly and hope for the best. Sometimes they turn out very well, and other times not so much. This is what I made tonight, and it turned out nicely. If I were to change anything, I might use a tad less miso next time, but it was quite nice as is.

Spicy Japanese/Korean Chicken

IMAG0006.jpg

3 Tbsp Japanese white miso

2 Tbsp regular Japanese soy sauce

2 Tbsp mirin

1-1/2 Tbsp Korean gochujang paste

1 tsp rice vinegar

2 tsp corn syrup

1 Tbsp sake

1/2 tsp sesame oil

8 grinds black pepper

1-1/2 Tbsp finely chopped ginger

1-1/2 Tbsp finely chopped garlic

3 to 4 scallions break off top green halves and discard (save for stock). Slice rest thin. Chop enough of that finely to equal 2 Tbsp and reserve the rest for garnish.

Mix all above (except reserved sliced scallions) well in bowl. Mash and stir to make a smooth paste. Finely chop enough extra garlic and ginger to make 3/4 tsp of each. Set those aside together in a very small bowl.

1 yellow onion, sliced into 1/4" slivers and separated

1 orange, yellow, or red bell pepper, sliced into 1/4" julienne

Set aside, separately.

1 boneless skinless chicken breast (or you could use two boneless skinless thighs instead)

Trim any yucky parts from the chicken and discard. Butterfly it, cover in a double layer of plastic wrap and pound a bit to even out the thickness. Slice in half lengthwise so you have two pieces the same size as the chicken breast (but not as thick, obviously). Submerge the chicken in the bowl of marinade. Cover everything and put all the bowls in the fridge while the chicken marinates overnight. Marinating for only a couple hours might be sufficient.

The next day (or however long you waited for the chicken to marinate), get rice ready in rice cooker or use whatever method you prefer. Turn on. I used brown short-grain rice, but use whatever type you like.

Set up your choice of pickled veggies on the serving dishes. Above I have spicy pickled radish, pickled cucumber, pickled ginger, and sweet pickled daikon (from L to R).

A little before rice is done, put a 1/2 tsp of oil (I used peanut oil) in wok (or medium frying pan) and fry the bell pepper over high heat. When it's blackened a bit and half done or so, remove from wok to a bowl. Put another 1/2 tsp of oil in the wok, if needed. Add the onion and cook until blackened a bit and slightly caramelized. Remove to bowl with the peppers.

Remove the chicken from the marinade and lightly pat dry with paper towels. Put some more oil in the wok (another 1/2 to 1 tsp) and fry the chicken on each side until done. You should get some blackened bits. Alternately, grill the chicken on the BBQ. Remove chicken to cutting board.

Wipe wok clean (or use fresh small saucepan like I did to save time) and add another 1/2 tsp oil. Add the reserved garlic and ginger and fry for a minute or so. Add some of the marinade (5-6 Tbsp or so) and fry another couple minutes. Turn down heat if necessary. Spoon some of the marinade from the saucepan into two individual dipping bowls. Return chicken to the saucepan and heat up a bit, turning on both sides. Remove to cutting board. Add onions and peppers to saucepan and heat through. Add 8 grinds of black pepper, stir, and divide between two serving dishes. Slice each piece of chicken into strips and put next to each serving of onions & peppers. Garnish with reserved sliced scallions and toasted sesame seeds, if desired. Put rice in serving bowl and garnish with some of the reserved scallion, if desired. Serves two.

Edited by Flash

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YUM!

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mmm, Flash! If it's got gochujang in it - I'm eating it. I can never finish the whole bag of miso. :(

 

If anyone likes Korean food, have you checked out: http://www.maangchi.com/She has excellent recipes and tutorials.

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I have her cookbook, but my most-used Korean cookbook is Dok Suni: Recipes from My Mother's Korean Kitchen by Jenny Kwak. Here is a kimchi recipe from that book. It's vegan, unlike some kimchi recipes.

Napa Cabbage Kimchi, Version 2

4 pounds Napa cabbage

3/4 cup coarse salt

Seasonings:

1 tsp finely minced ginger root

1 cup Korean red pepper powder

2 Tbsp sugar

3 Tbsp garlic juice*

1 cup onion juice*

4 ounces scallions, cut into 1-inch lengths

3 Tbsp coarse salt

1. Coarsely chop the cabbage into 1-inch pieces. Place in container. Dissolve 3/4 salt in 2 cups of water and pour over the cabbage. Use your hand to mix it evenly. Cover and let it pickle for 3 hours. Toss and turn over and pickle it for 3 more hours. Strain the cabbage and discard the salt water.

2. In a mixing bowl, combine all the seasonings and mix. Add the scallion last. Let it sit for 10 minutes.distribute the seasoning on the cabbage and blend in using your hands.

3. Tightly pack the cabbage in a gallon-size jar. Cover the surface with plastic wrap and press down to get rid of air pockets. Store at 70 degrees for 24 hours to ferment. Chill before serving.

*Use a blender. Avoid diluting it by adding too much water when liquifying. Add a little water, just enough to help the blender mix smoothly. For the onion, sift the juice in a mesh strainer for a smooth consistency.

Edited by Flash

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Who's got a good recipe for wonton soup with home made wontons?

 

It's still really hard for me to not call it "wanton" soup because it feels so comforting yet so decadent.

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