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Flash, that chicken looks great, but I'm curious why you cook the peppers and onions separately.  Couldn't they be stir-fried at the same time?

 

olga

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I often cook all of the veggies most of the way first with Asian cuisines, because I don't always time things right when throwing everything in the wok together (at least I used to have that problem). Otherwise some of the veggies might get overdone before the meat is all the way cooked (or another veggie like globe eggplant or potato that takes longer to cook). If I'm making several dishes that I want to come out at the same time, I just find it's easier that way rather going insane trying to juggle the timing for everything at the same time. Nowadays with just one dish, it's more habit than anything. Plus I used to smoke and I probably took a cigarette break in-between the veggies and meat. LOL.

*With Chinese, it's usually the meat that gets done first during the velveting process. I set that aside, then do the veggies and set aside. Then I do the garlic, ginger and sauce for all the dishes at the same time and then toss back in the meat and veggies.

Edited by Flash

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Here's a recipe for ginger pork that I like. I sometimes slice the pork thinly in smaller pieces and treat as a stir-fry.

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup soy sauce

1 tsp mirin

2 Tbsp chicken stock or water

1 lb. pork fillet, trimmed of sinew, cut into slices 1/2" thick (boneless country pork ribs, well trimmed of fat also work well)

1/2 cup peeled and finely grated fresh ginger (I no peel last time and it work just fine)

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

2 scallions, thinly sliced

1 tsp sesame seeds, for garnish

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine sugar, soy sauce, mirin, and stock and bring to a boil.

Dip both sides of each pork slice into the grated ginger.  Reserve any leftover ginger.  Heat oil in frying pan over medium-high heat.  Add prok and fry, turning once until pork is no longer pink, 3-4 minutes.  Add sauce to pan with any remaining grated ginger and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low and simmer for 1 minute.  Remove pork from pan and divide among 4 warmed plates.  Spoon any remaining sauce over.  Garnish with sliced scallions and sprinkle with sesame seeds.  Serve immediately.

From Japanese Home Cooking by Shunsuke Fukushima  

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Here's a good recipe for Thai cashew chicken. I've also used the sauce in other dishes, e.g. With sliced Chinese eggplant, lots of sliced Serrano peppers, and basil. I modified the sauce once and the alterations made it absolutely to die for. Unfortunately I lost the paper with all my changes. It's very good as-is.

1 pound. chicken, cut into thin slices, and into bite sized pieces.

1 tablespoon kratiem (garlic), thinly sliced

1 tablespoon prik ki nu daeng (red bird's-eye chillies), thinly sliced

1 tablespoon nam pla (fish sauce)

1 tablespoon si-ew wan (sweet soy), or Maggi's Seasoning Sauce

2 tablespoon oyster sauce

1 tablespoon honey

1 tablespoon nam prik pao (chilli paste)

1 teaspoon prik thai (black pepper), freshly cracked

3 tablespoon nam sup (stock)

2 tablespoon rice wine

½ cup cashew nuts

2 tablespoon mango, shredded

3 tablespoon ton hom (green onions)

3 tablespoon prik yuet (sweet Thai chillies), or green bell pepper, julienned

Mango, green onions, chiles, and cilantro shredded for garnish

First roast the cashews: this is best done in a convection oven at 575ñF until golden brown. In a wok, over medium heat, sauté the garlic and prik ki nu, until the garlic is golden and the whole is aromatic, then remove and reserve the chillies and garlic. Add the chicken and all the ingredients except the cashews, stock and wine to the pan and stir fry until the chicken just begins to cook. Add the stock and continue over low heat until the chicken is cooked, then using a slotted spoon remove the chicken from the sauce and set aside. Add the rice wine, and reduce the sauce until a slight glaze appears (if necessary add 1 teaspoon arrowroot powder, dissolved in a little tepid water). Return the chicken, chillies and garlic to the sauce, and add the cashews. Make sure they are heated through. Garnish and serve with steamed white rice.

Recipe from: Colonel Ian F. Khuntilanont-Philpott

http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_recipe.cgi?thai+recipe95

Edited by Flash

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Korean chicken and potato stew

1 pound boneless chicken thigh meat, cut in 1-inch chunks

2 medium potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 onion, chopped

2 Tbsp Korean red pepper flakes*

2 tsp crushed garlic

2 tsp sugar

3 Tbsp soy sauce

1 Tbsp rice wine (sake)

2 tsp sesame oil

1/2 cup water

4 ounces scallions, cut in 1-inch lengths

1. Combine all the ingredients except the water and scallions in a pot and mix together. Add the water and mix again. Cover and cook for 20 minutes.

2. Add the scallions and cook for 3 more minutes.

*if you don't have this, you can use regular red pepper flakes, but cut the amount in half.

I added three large roll-cut carrots and increased the seasoning ingredients and water by 50%.

From Dok Suni: Recipes from my mother's Korean kitchen by Jenny Kwak

post-35938-0-71790800-1428508407_thumb.j

Edited by Flash

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Flash, that looks amazing. Did you use the extra water and seasoning because of the carrots, or for some other reason? Or was that her commentary?

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I realize I have a lot in store at the moment, and I love to hear your suggestions! I love to try new combinations! do not eat meat, I do eat vegan/vegetarian/fish.

I never cooked with turned tops before, so I would especally love a suggestion for that.

Here is what I have:

Fresh

- 1 red bell pepper

- 1/2 cucumber

- kale

- 1 orange

- 1 lemon

- a lot of garlic

- 1 mandarin

- tzatisiki

- blueberries

- curd

In store

- 1 can of tuna

- dried brown lentils (for 1 person)

- 1 can of sweet corn

- a lot of pasta

- a lot of couscous

- mixed quinoa (for 1-2 persons)

- olive oil

- balsamico oil

- unsalted almonds

- unsalted mixed nuts

- soy sauce

- old raisins

- dried Italian herbs

- sunflower seeds (not that much

- buillion

- dried cinnamon (powder)

- some cacoa nibs

- sugar

- salt, pepper, chili powder

- red wine

Edited by Sawi

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I just found this thread, I missed it before. Thank you sawi for resurrecting it.

Flash, thank you for all the Korean recipes! I go into withdrawal if I don't have bibimbap regularly. I'll have to get the Dok Suni book, I checked it out years ago at the library. I use a book called Korean Cuisine, it has some good marinade and sauce recipes.

Now I'm hungry.

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Flash, that looks amazing. Did you use the extra water and seasoning because of the carrots, or for some other reason? Or was that her commentary?

Yeah, it's for the carrots. I also like having more liquid.

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I just found this thread, I missed it before. Thank you sawi for resurrecting it.

Flash, thank you for all the Korean recipes! I go into withdrawal if I don't have bibimbap regularly. I'll have to get the Dok Suni book, I checked it out years ago at the library. I use a book called Korean Cuisine, it has some good marinade and sauce recipes.

Now I'm hungry.

Is Korean Cuisine a thin paperback by Young Sook Choi? I use that to make pancakes. Here's a marinade recipe for pork from Dok Suni. It also works well for chicken.

3 Tbsp soy sauce

2 Tbsp crushed garlic (my notes say to use more)

1/2 tsp crushed gingerroot (my notes say to use more)

2 Tbsp brown sugar

2 Tbsp red pepper sauce (gochujang)

1 tsp red pepper flakes (korean type)

2 Tbsp rice wine (sake)

2 Tbsp sesame oil (my notes say to use less, say 2-3 tsp)

Combine ingredients and mix well. Marinate one pound of thinly sliced meat for ten minutes, then grill. You can also fry it in a pan or wok using a little oil.

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I realize I have a lot in store at the moment, and I love to hear your suggestions! I love to try new combinations! do not eat meat, I do eat vegan/vegetarian/fish.

I never cooked with turned tops before, so I would especally love a suggestion for that.

 

Here is what I have:

 

Fresh

- 1 red bell pepper

- 1/2 cucumber

- 2 oranges

- 1 lemon

- turnip-tops

- a lot of garlic

- 1 mandarin

- tzatisiki

- blueberries

- real good tomatoes

- curd

- margarine

 

In store

- 1 can of tuna

- dried brown lentils (for 1 person)

- 1 can of sweet corn

- a lot of pasta

- a lot of couscous

- mixed quinoa (for 1-2 persons)

- olive oil

- balsamico oil

- unsalted almonds

- unsalted mixed nuts

- soy sauce

- old raisins

- dried Italian herbs

- sunflower seeds (not that much

- buillion

- dried cinnamon (powder)

- some cacoa nibs

- sugar

- salt, pepper, chili powder

- red wine

That's a challenging list. You could make a salad with ground peanuts, soy sauce, lemon juice, garlic, cucumber, and tomatoes. It's supposed to have a little seeded Serrano chili as well, but I guess you could make it without. I don't like tuna, so I'm not entirely sure what you could do with it. Maybe stuff the red pepper with a mixture of tuna, couscous (or quinoa), corn, salt, pepper, and italian Herbs?

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A lot of people think that school food is pretty bad, and I'd have to agree with them. However, there was one dish served when I was in school that I find myself wanting, even craving. It's semi-sweet white sticky rice with raisins. Does anyone know of a recipe for this?

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Sticky rice is made with a special rice that's really white. Opaque white, not translucent. It can be found in asian food stores. Sometimes it is called sweet rice. Normally it's steamed, but I made it in a rice cooker last time. Not sure if I soaked the rice first, but Recipe says to soak 1-1/2 to 2 cups of it for five hours or overnight then steam it in a special steamer basket designed for sticky rice (or in a sieve suspended above a saucepan of boiling water).

Put a damp kitchen towel over the rice, folded to cover all the rice. Reduce heat to provide a steady flow of steam. Cook until the rice swells, glistens, and become sticky enough to form in little balls, about 30-45 minutes. The cooking time depends on how long you soaked the rice. I probably just rinsed the rice in a sieve, then made rice according to the rice cooker directions. There may have even been special directions for stick rice in the rice cooker manual. I don't think I used damp towel; I just put the lid on. But I don't remember.

While the rice is cooking, I make a sauce using a can of coconut milk, 1 cup of sugar, and 2 tsp salt. Mix together in a saucepan and bring to a gentle boil over medium heat until dissolved and then set aside. I poured That right over the cooked rice in the rice cooker. But f you're not using a rice cooke, you should turn out 3 cups of the rice into a large bowl, pour the sauce over, stir well, and cover. let that set for 30 -60 minutes to let the rice absorb most of the sauce. Serve with fruit. Mangoes are especially good.

You can make a sauce to drizzle over made from 3/4 cup coconut milk and 1/2 tsp salt in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook until coconut milk thickens a bit, about five minutes.

From Real Vegetarian Thai by Nancie McDermott

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Oh, I forgot to mention that sticky rice does not reheat well. It's best to make only as much as you need at a time.

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Thanks, Flash, but I think the rice was just plain white rice and the stickiness came from the natural affinity of wet well cooked rice to clump together with a slight sugar glaze. I don't know though. I'm sure the school didn't buy any fancy rice or special Asian rice though. There also wasn't any sauce with it. We just got like an ice cream scoop of it on our plate. The only things it did have were raisins.

 

I do appreciate it, and I'm going to try that recipe to see if I can approximate what I had. 

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I don't know of a recipe that uses ordinary rice. I can tell you that the recipe above is very yummy. It's not overly sweet, despite the cup of sugar. I don't think I made the drizzling sauce last time and it was still good. I always make it with mangoes. some thai restaurants serve this, so you might try it at a restaurant before going through the rigamarole. Below are links to pictures of what the special rice looks like before and after cooking.

http://www.khiewchanta.com/images/sticky-rice-grains.jpg

http://www.expat-visa.com/thai_food_recipes/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/thai_sticky_rice.jpg

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Was it arroz con leche? If there was cinnamon in it maybe. Not all of them are super milky and liquidy. 

 

Also, Flash your recipes always make me drool. 

Edited by iaawal

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Here's an easy Moroccan dish that I always like.

Honeyed chicken tagine

1 Tbsp olive oil

4 chicken portions

2 garlic cloves, crushed

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground ginger

2 Tbsp lemon juice

2 Tbsp honey (I sometimes use a little more)

1 cup chicken stock

1/3 cup raisins

1/2 cup flaked almonds

Salt and pepper

Parsley sprigs, to garnish

Brown chicken in oil in a Dutch oven or other heavy pot. Remove chicken to a plate.

Add onion and garlic to the pot. Cook until softened, but not browned.

Add the cinnamon and ginger, and stir for one minute then return the chicken to the pot. Add the lemon juice, honey, and stock. Heat just to a simmer, then cover and cook gently for about 1 hour.

Transfer chicken to a warm platter. Cover and keep warm. Add the raisins and almonds to the pot and boil until the liquid is reduced and slightly syrupy. Season with salt and pepper and extra lemon juice, if needed. Spoon sauce over or around chicken pieces. Garnish with parsley and serve.

From The Moroccan Collection by Hilaire Walden

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Thanks, Flash and iaawal for trying to help me figure this rice dish out. iaawal, I don't think it was arroz con leche, and I'm pretty sure it wasn't any form of rice pudding. Maybe it was though and I'm wrong, but it was never referred to as rice pudding (or I would have remembered).

Edited by jt07

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