Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Recommended Posts

My only tip for vegetarians is that eating seasonally can make a 1000% difference in the amount and quality of nutrients you get. A tomato in the summer is not the same as a tomato in the winter, and a squash in the winter is not the same as a squash in the summer. Seasonal foods are harvested in that season because of when they grow best, which in turn means that they are most nutrient rich.

Check out http://www.whfoods.com/ for lots of good stuff.

Raw foods are technically healthier than the exact same foods cooked, but since we're used to eating so many pre-made or pre-packaged foods it would be hard to eat all the same things raw. So you need to be even more conerned than the mere vegetarian about all your nutrients, how you mix foods in a meal, stuff like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only raw vegans I've known have been emaciated, with sparse hair and dry skin -- clear signs of ill health.  I know one, at least, was positively religious about making sure he obtained the proper nutrients.  It didn't seem to make much difference.  I lost track of him for a couple years and then saw him again, after he'd switched over to just being vegan.  He looked much better. 

Maybe it would be a good idea as a cleanse, but the three I've met didn't seem to be doing so well on a long-term raw vegan diet. 

I'm still trying to learn to balance plain old veganism. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i don't personally know anyone who's gone raw for more than a few months at a time. it can be an excellent way to cleanse and to get perspective, and often people consider it a deeply spiritual experience, but it just doesn't seem healthy in the long run. the body starts to break down. it's always intrigued me, and i've always wanted to try it, but i don't think my body would like me very much if i did, since i'm allergic to lots of veggies as it is, and the raw are worse than the cooked...

if you want to try some raw recipes, there are a lot of good ones in this book, so long as you can get past the ooo-we-are-so-Sexay vibe the authors like to give off. Pure is a crazy spensy place to eat, so trying the recipes at home yourself is a tad more cost-effective. (i remember a friend of mine being utterly astounded at spending 'THAT much money on food they didn't even COOK!')

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone so far for your tips! It's especially great to hear from those of you who have either tried the raw thing or know people who have. And Imnop, as another vegan and someone who knows raw people, your info was very important.

Grouse- Good question. I'm interested in being more nutritionally and environmentally aware. Not that I'm a saint about what I eat or always taking the bus or something- but I do think of these things. I'd like to try to eliminate some or all of the cooking in my diet and FOCUS on the fresh stuff. I want to GET AWAY FROM eating all grains and GO TO working much more with raw.

Just like the transition to being vegan was an eye-opener, I suspect going raw would be as well. I want to focus on rounding up the stuff I don't eat enough of. I feel guilty about not eating raw stuff now.

When I became vegan my diet was much more balanced. Now I live on soy and whole grains. My blood work is great but I know I'm not getting those great cancer fighters that are found in raw stuff.

I'm going to do it, and only do it for a set period of time. I'll see if my weight stays stable. It should stay up there with all these damn meds!

Right now I weigh 135# and am 5'5. Let's see how the weight stays or goes...!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've since become an Ayurvedic practitioner so I take the view now that it is not healthy to lead a regular life on raw foods.  But perhaps you want to be a yogi, in which case raw foods may be just what you need.  But WARNING: it is addictive.  Even after you can't crap anymore or have normal relationships.  That's why I suggest it only for a couple of months and only in the summer.

If you're going to do it, I would recommend getting these books: "Raw: the Cookbook" and "Rawsome".  What counts as raw is anything that STAYS under 107 degrees so as not to kill the enzymes.  So that means cashews e.g. and soy milk are not raw.  You can make other kinds of milks from sprouted seeds though and that's kind of fun.  The books will lead you more on that.

As to protein, I was actually stronger on raw foods than I am now off it.  Baby's milk has about the same protein percentage as raw foods (5%) and look at what baby milk can do: grow a tiny infant into a big toddler.  I was on it for 2 years and never had a problem craving protein etc.

As to fat, I lost weight in the beginning, but it equilibriated and I wasn't unattractively thin.  Again, I never craved fats or sweets etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...