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In the past year or so I've developed a number of physical and verbal tics related to obsessive thoughts. For example, hand flapping or shaking my head or grunting or saying "no!" when distressing intrusive thoughts pop into my mind. Recently I've also started rocking my body back and forth when anxious, even if I'm in public. Does anyone else experience this as part of their OCD? My therapist seems to think this I have a fairly uncommon subtype of the disorder and I wonder how true that is.

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It was worse when I was younger but I still find myself clicking my teeth or tapping something whenever I pass some kind of repetitive structure. Like if I was in a car on the motorway and we were passing light posts, I'd click/tap every time I was in alignment with a light. Or if I'm walking down a corridor with a lot of doors, I'd click/tap every time I'd pass a door.

Don't know if this counts as a tic but it was pretty effing weird.

Rocking back and forth is pretty soothing though

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I don't think it's unusual.

Is your tdoc a specialist in OCD?

yep, she is, fortunately. I think she called it "tourettic OCD," though I also fit into other subtypes. I agree that it can't possibly be that unusual, though. I'll ask her about it again when I see her.

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I get tics due to both Tourette's and OCD, and it can be hard to tell which ones are which. I find that OCD tics are semi-voluntary, but incredibly uncomfortable for me to not do them, and they are also related to something external. I often tense my legs when I'm in the car and the driver goes past lampposts (one leg at a time, depending on which side the lamppost is on) and, because lampposts are everywhere, it's incredibly distracting. I also tap things repeatedly, my girlfriend hates me for it  :lol:

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have major issues with saying things or standing there looking funny with my face screwed up when an unwelcome thought enters my head.  Which is a lot.  It's ruining my life.  Generally the  unwelcome thoughts that trigger this are thoughts of times when I have done something stupid or embarrassing or times that someone was unkind to me.  Sometimes I swear and sometimes I say truly bizzare stuff (I don't even know where it came from), other times I yell at my dog for no reason.

pdoc says it is OCD that doesn't fit the norm.  I'm not so sure as my visual disturbances and hallucinations don't fit OCD.  I do agree that I probably have OCD but question whether the blurting out things is OCD or something else.

I have problems with saying and thinking rhyming words and my pdoc says that is common in OCD but I can't find anything to back that up.

I also make up words to say out loud and don't see any evidence that is OCD either.

 

 

 

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I have major issues with saying things or standing there looking funny with my face screwed up when an unwelcome thought enters my head.  Which is a lot.  It's ruining my life.  Generally the  unwelcome thoughts that trigger this are thoughts of times when I have done something stupid or embarrassing or times that someone was unkind to me.  Sometimes I swear and sometimes I say truly bizzare stuff (I don't even know where it came from), other times I yell at my dog for no reason.

pdoc says it is OCD that doesn't fit the norm.  I'm not so sure as my visual disturbances and hallucinations don't fit OCD.  I do agree that I probably have OCD but question whether the blurting out things is OCD or something else.

I have problems with saying and thinking rhyming words and my pdoc says that is common in OCD but I can't find anything to back that up.

I also make up words to say out loud and don't see any evidence that is OCD either.

 

 

 

Most of this sounds really familiar to me.  I've just started taking generic Intuniv and it seems to be helping quite a lot.

 

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In the past year or so I've developed a number of physical and verbal tics related to obsessive thoughts. For example, hand flapping or shaking my head or grunting or saying "no!" when distressing intrusive thoughts pop into my mind. Recently I've also started rocking my body back and forth when anxious, even if I'm in public. Does anyone else experience this as part of their OCD? My therapist seems to think this I have a fairly uncommon subtype of the disorder and I wonder how true that is.

Doesn't sound uncommon to me. These are all very valid coping mechanisms. There are MUCH MUCH worse things you could be doing. Rocking is good. Yelling NO at those intrusives thoughts is VERY healthy. I tell mine to eat shit and die. lol. 

Verbal and physical 'tics' are very effective. Get you out of your head and into your body. Talk to yourself, move around, and somehow or another get yourself out of your head and into your life. YOur therapist sounds a bit vanilla to me. this does not sound uncommon. I am not a medical professional but I have seen my fair share of rocking. This is something kids do all the time. Society is not used to this but it is becoming more and more common. 

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In the past year or so I've developed a number of physical and verbal tics related to obsessive thoughts. For example, hand flapping or shaking my head or grunting or saying "no!" when distressing intrusive thoughts pop into my mind. Recently I've also started rocking my body back and forth when anxious, even if I'm in public. Does anyone else experience this as part of their OCD? My therapist seems to think this I have a fairly uncommon subtype of the disorder and I wonder how true that is.

Doesn't sound uncommon to me. These are all very valid coping mechanisms. There are MUCH MUCH worse things you could be doing. Rocking is good. Yelling NO at those intrusives thoughts is VERY healthy. I tell mine to eat shit and die. lol. 

Verbal and physical 'tics' are very effective. Get you out of your head and into your body. Talk to yourself, move around, and somehow or another get yourself out of your head and into your life. YOur therapist sounds a bit vanilla to me. this does not sound uncommon. I am not a medical professional but I have seen my fair share of rocking. This is something kids do all the time. Society is not used to this but it is becoming more and more common. 

Do you personally experience this Water?

If not, please don't post here.

 

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In the past year or so I've developed a number of physical and verbal tics related to obsessive thoughts. For example, hand flapping or shaking my head or grunting or saying "no!" when distressing intrusive thoughts pop into my mind. Recently I've also started rocking my body back and forth when anxious, even if I'm in public. Does anyone else experience this as part of their OCD? My therapist seems to think this I have a fairly uncommon subtype of the disorder and I wonder how true that is.

Doesn't sound uncommon to me. These are all very valid coping mechanisms. There are MUCH MUCH worse things you could be doing. Rocking is good. Yelling NO at those intrusives thoughts is VERY healthy. I tell mine to eat shit and die. lol. 

Verbal and physical 'tics' are very effective. Get you out of your head and into your body. Talk to yourself, move around, and somehow or another get yourself out of your head and into your life. YOur therapist sounds a bit vanilla to me. this does not sound uncommon. I am not a medical professional but I have seen my fair share of rocking. This is something kids do all the time. Society is not used to this but it is becoming more and more common. 

Do you personally experience this Water?

If not, please don't post here.

 

I rock my body back and forth when anxious. Yes I do. I also do the occasional hand flapping  and grunting, slapping my leg, moving around parts of my body when distressing intrusive thoughts start filtering in. I find that the physical movement helps.

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And this has been diagnosed as part of OCD?  What you describe could just as easily be autistic spectrum.

The way you addressed it wasn't very 1st person.

What's key here is the relationship to intrusive thoughts, not just anxiety.  Verbal tics as well.

This is something I experience personally and what you describe does not sound like the same thing.

 

 

Edited by Velvet Elvis
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Doesn't sound uncommon to me. These are all very valid coping mechanisms. There are MUCH MUCH worse things you could be doing. Rocking is good. Yelling NO at those intrusives thoughts is VERY healthy. I tell mine to eat shit and die. lol. 

Verbal and physical 'tics' are very effective. Get you out of your head and into your body. Talk to yourself, move around, and somehow or another get yourself out of your head and into your life. YOur therapist sounds a bit vanilla to me. this does not sound uncommon. I am not a medical professional but I have seen my fair share of rocking. This is something kids do all the time. Society is not used to this but it is becoming more and more common. 

You discuss all of this as if there's a conscious choice in the matter and there just isn't.  If it's a tic, it's pre-cognitive.  It's like a sneeze.  A sneeze isn't a "coping mechanism."  

  

You are talking about something entirely different from everyone else here.

 

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Doesn't sound uncommon to me. These are all very valid coping mechanisms. There are MUCH MUCH worse things you could be doing. Rocking is good. Yelling NO at those intrusives thoughts is VERY healthy. I tell mine to eat shit and die. lol. 

Verbal and physical 'tics' are very effective. Get you out of your head and into your body. Talk to yourself, move around, and somehow or another get yourself out of your head and into your life. YOur therapist sounds a bit vanilla to me. this does not sound uncommon. I am not a medical professional but I have seen my fair share of rocking. This is something kids do all the time. Society is not used to this but it is becoming more and more common. 

You discuss all of this as if there's a conscious choice in the matter and there just isn't.  If it's a tic, it's pre-cognitive.  It's like a sneeze.  A sneeze isn't a "coping mechanism."  

  

You are talking about something entirely different from everyone else here.

 

sorry. I'll stop posting.

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I don't have OCD or tics, so I hope it's post here (if not I'll delete).

Doesn't sound uncommon to me. These are all very valid coping mechanisms. There are MUCH MUCH worse things you could be doing. Rocking is good. Yelling NO at those intrusives thoughts is VERY healthy. I tell mine to eat shit and die. lol. 

Verbal and physical 'tics' are very effective. Get you out of your head and into your body. Talk to yourself, move around, and somehow or another get yourself out of your head and into your life. YOur therapist sounds a bit vanilla to me. this does not sound uncommon. I am not a medical professional but I have seen my fair share of rocking. This is something kids do all the time. Society is not used to this but it is becoming more and more common. 

You discuss all of this as if there's a conscious choice in the matter and there just isn't.  If it's a tic, it's pre-cognitive.  It's like a sneeze.  A sneeze isn't a "coping mechanism."  

  

You are talking about something entirely different from everyone else here.

 

What you are describing here, Water, is stimming. Self-stimulation that is purposely used to calm or to stimulate yourself. Most commonly an ASD thing but 'cousins' like myself and people with ADHD do it a lot too; which yes is healthy and yes should be socially acceptable but isn't (yet). It helps calm you in stressful situations, but it is a purposeful coping mechanism people use, and not a tic (as VE describes better than I could).

*back to original topic*

Edited by Sloane
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  • 4 months later...

Coming to this forum has been an education in our "Oh, wait, that's OCD? Ah crap. I thought we'd beaten that." pattern..

Hair pulling, skin picking, and verbal tics and flinches at intrusive/distressing thoughts. ..Yeah, we still get all of those XP I guess we'll never be entirely rid of it?

Wynn

Edited by WinterTidings
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