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onesadgirl

Therapist's books

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So, maybe I should have asked this question BEFORE I bought/read some published writing my therapist has done, but better late than never, I guess.  

The writing was fairly old, so I don't know if it matches her current beliefs, but suffice it to say, it was disturbing reading (one article was on belief in angels and demons and the possibility that demon possession is being mixed up with mental illness sometimes). I'm kind of at a loss for what to do with it now. 

So, my question/s: was I wrong to read it in the first place? Have any of you out there read anything by your therapist? And am going to come off as totally creepy if I tell her I read it/am bothered by it?

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I'm curious about the demons, actually. I'd read that. I read a book by my therapists' colleague on the subject and we talked about where it informs her thinking and where it doesn't. On the whole I found it really helpful to have that conversation. It helped me understand where she was coming from and where I could anticipate friction.

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This sounds like very archaic thinking on behalf of your therapist. Maybe she needs to see a pdoc of her own, because, in this day and age, demons as an explanation for MI is beyond silly, it's fucking stupid -- and quite an unprofessional way of thinking, not to mention borderline psychotic.

I think you're totally justified in bringing it up. Personally, if she legitimately believes this, especially since it makes you uncomfortable, I'd suggest looking for a new therapist, as, such beliefs have no place in modern psychology.

IMHO, of course.

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No, you aren't wrong to have read it. If my therapist was an author i would want to read, but I don't believe she has anything published. I don't think you will come off creepy for having read it and she should be able to accept criticism.

I think it is important to bring it up, since it does bother you. It would bother me, too.(a lot, actually)

 

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I don't think it's wrong.  In an ideal world, perhaps you might have discussed it with her first so that you could do some processing around what it might mean - but it's perfectly natural to be curious about your therapist and to want to get information about them.

I will confess that I have the unfortunate habit of VERY thoroughly Googling my therapist.  And I have found some rather "interesting" things, though nothing that calls into question her ability to work with me.  I haven't discussed it with her because 1) I'm really ashamed of it because I'd rather I didn't do it (I've actually stopped for a while because it makes me feel so bad about myself, but I've already seen most of what there is to see, I think) but also 2) it doesn't really compromise my ability to work with her.

If what you found compromises your ability to work with her (and since it's directly related to MI, it's kind of a different type of thing than the embarrassing video I found) I think it's totally reasonable to bring it up. 

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As background...

My ex-psychiatrist wrote a book. I haven't read it, since I determined (at great pain and emotional cost) that he's a "christian" therapist who seems to think that you can pray the depression away. That and massive doses of meds and maybe some ECT. I do read his blog...it's borderline plagiaristic, and reflects the fact that he's not capable of much in the way of independent thought. (Note that I put christian in quotes not to denigrate christians, or even christian faith-based counselors, but to reflect the fact that his behavior was anything but Christ-like.)

I never googled my therapist while I was seeing her. I actually didn't want to know anything about her. After she rejected me and abandoned me, I began obsessively searching for information about her. I was trying to figure out what in her life could have lead her to become such a cold-hearted, judgmental person capable of acting in such a cruel and unethical way. Still haven't figured it out...and I've tried really, really hard.

So to try and answer the OPs question, you bet. If I thought I could trust a therapist again and was considering going into therapy, I'd find every damn thing I could about them and what they'd written in order to protect myself. Personally, if you found what she wrote disturbing, I think it's fair game to talk with her and see if it reflects her views. You can then decide whether it's safe to continue therapy with her, or if you should flee to protect yourself.

My opinion is, no doubt, colored by a really bad, very traumatic experience. But regardless, I think it's totally fine, and you're totally ok to ask her about it. 

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I haven't encountered that exact scenario, but something similar.  When I first started with my current therapist I came across an archived video of his 30 minute locally televised interview regarding an association he's involved with and the kind of policy and outreach work they do.

When I let him know that I had seen the video and he saw my affirmative response to it, he smiled and relaxed a bit.  He said that that just took care of some basic personal and professional disclosure from his end and my response to the video gave him an idea on where I stand on those issues.  So in our case it turned out to be helpful indirect communication of some useful things that may otherwise have taken a while to come around to actually asking/telling about.

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This sounds like very archaic thinking on behalf of your therapist. Maybe she needs to see a pdoc of her own, because, in this day and age, demons as an explanation for MI is beyond silly, it's fucking stupid -- and quite an unprofessional way of thinking, not to mention borderline psychotic.

There is an argument that using demons as an explanation can be culturally appropriate in some instances. I don't fully buy it, but I have definitely seen my dx compared to possession and read many an argument that begs for exorcism. 

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So, my question/s: was I wrong to read it in the first place? Have any of you out there read anything by your therapist? And am going to come off as totally creepy if I tell her I read it/am bothered by it?

You were not wrong to read it anymore so than someone is wrong who researches their meds.

I don't currently have a therapist though when I did, they were not published authors (that I know of).

You will not come off as creepy. This is exactly the sort of thing that needs to be discussed with your therapist. It goes to the heart of the therapeutic relationship.

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I don't think you were wrong to read any of it.  My pdoc has never written any books (that I know of), so I've never read anything by him.  However if he were to publish something I would definitely read it. 

I agree with jt ... I don't think you will come off as creepy either. 

And as others have said in above posts, I'd bring it up with your tdoc.  Then you can decide how that conversation went and how you feel after it, and whether you want to look for a new tdoc or not.

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I will confess that I have the unfortunate habit of VERY thoroughly Googling my therapist.  And I have found some rather "interesting" things, though nothing that calls into question her ability to work with me.  I haven't discussed it with her because 1) I'm really ashamed of it because I'd rather I didn't do it (I've actually stopped for a while because it makes me feel so bad about myself, but I've already seen most of what there is to see, I think) but also 2) it doesn't really compromise my ability to work with her.

thank you for sharing this. I think that's a big part of my hesitation to bring it up with her. The concerning essay is from an out of print book from the 80s, which I only found because of a particularly deep Google search. I feel pretty ashamed about doing the search, too. I'm not sure I could handle the follow up questions that might come up (how did you find this? What else did you find? Etc). But it's helpful to know that I'm not the only one who has done this/feels this way about it. 

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