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first off, a few links i have found in my quest for Vegan Recipes That Do Not Take Sixteen Days To Prepare Or Involve Scary Ingredients:

http://www.cok.net/lit/recipes/dinner.php

of special note: Black Bean Burgers (could maybe be made glutenfree with substitutions for bread/crackers), Quick Quesadillas (mmm, chickpeas!), 'Chicken' Nuggets (will have to try them before i can confirm they are delicious-er than the Trader Joe's frozen variety, which rocks)

http://vegweb.com/recipes/quick/

the Lazy Punk Lentil Spread looks yummy. i'll have to wade through here to find other good ones. all of these are super fast and easy, though.

Black Bean Topped Sweet Potatoes

Eggplant Po' Boys

Curried Chickpea Spread (can be used in wraps and rollups with veggies and such)

i have some of my own i'll type up later. i am attempting pumpkin soup later, and will report back on its deliciousness or lack thereof.

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but wait, there's more!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

curried pumpkin soup:

one medium onion, finely chopped

two cloves garlic, finely chopped

knob of ginger, 2" long, finely chopped

1 Tbsp margarine

1 1/2 tsp garam masala

1/2 tsp cumin

3/4 tsp red pepper flakes

3/4 tsp salt

1 can solid-pack pumpkin

7oz coconut milk

6oz veggie stock

3 cups water

get big pot. put margarine in it. saute onion in margarine over medium heat until soft - about six minutes. add ginger and garlic and saute for another minute. add spices and simmer for another minute. add everything else and bring to slow boil. simmer over medium-low heat, uncovered, for half an hour. puree in blender - make sure you only puree a little of the soup at a time. thin with more water if you wish. soup! yay soup! if you want a creamier soup, use the whole can of coconut milk and leave out the veggie stock.

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curried anything:

curry paste is your friend. red curry, green curry, panang... whatever. mix a bit of it with some coconut milk and simmer whatever you like in it til nice and tender. i like green curry with zucchini and water chestnuts, or a panang with broccoli and bamboo shoots. fair warning: a bit of curry paste goes a long way, and the flavour intensifies as it simmers. if you find your curry bitter, a bit of brown sugar will lighten it.

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sammiches:

chop up half a cucumber, three green onions, three or four handfuls of baby spinach, and a few tablespoons of fresh mint. add in half a jar of sundried tomatoes in oil (drained and chopped). sprinkle with olive oil and redwine vinegar and salt and pepper to taste. stuff in pita halves. if you're dairy-inclined, feta cheese is good in this too, and you can make a quick tzatziki-like sauce with plain yogurt, chopped garlic and cayenne to taste.

also good in the summertime: chop up some fresh tomato and mint. wrap it up in a spinach tortilla with salt and pepper. as long as the tomato is fresh, this = best. sammich. evar.

also have a recipe for eggplant penne.... thing, but it involves lots of chopping.

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Oh yay!  Oh joy!  Oh rapture!  I've been trying to find an approachable pumpkin soup recipe for a very long time.  Thanks, hal! 

Curry paste... where do you find that?  I have basic yellow curry powder, but I've never noticed other varieties while shopping. 

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just so you know, that pumpkin recipe makes a metric assload of soup. it might tolerate freezing, though. i think i'm gonna try it.

curry paste - again, asian supermarkets are your friend. you can make a pretty good yellow curry just with the ordinary madras powder you've got, though:

chop up an onion or two and sautee them in a little veggie oil until browned and softened. chop up and add in a knob of ginger, a few cloves of garlic, a pinch of cloves, a cinnamon stick or two - whatever you like. add yellow curry powder to taste - at least three or four tablespoons - and a can or two of coconut milk. peel and cube some potatoes and simmer until potatoes are soft. you can also add tomato.

serve over saffron rice or biryani or plain basmati. yellow curry is specially good with spicy chickpeas. i forget what they're called, but they come in tins.

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Thanks for the websites! I've already bookmarked them. I don't generally enjoy cooking, but now that I suddenly have some time, I thought I might give it another try. I really only cook from recipes, I don't do that look in the cupboard and make dinner thing. On the other hand, I really enjoy baking.

Not vegan, but my partner really likes the cookbooks:

"Fresh from the Vegetarian Slow Cooker"

  A nice way to cook, toss the ingredients in and ignore for hours.

"The Student's Vegetarian Cookbook"

  Quick, easy, cheap.

"30 low-fat Vegetarian Meals in 30 Minutes"

  Also fairly quick and easy. Very handy because it provides a whole meal -- one of    my favorites provides a tomato stew over cous-cous, salad, and fresh mint tea. (I can post this one if anyone's interested?)

She also sometimes spends whole afternoons in the bookstore copying recipes from cookbooks (much cheaper than buying the books).

Fiona

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  • 1 month later...

Vegan Chocolate Cake:

3 cups unsifted all-purpose flour

2 cups sugar

1/2 cup cocoa powder

2 tsp baking soda

1 tsp salt

2 cups water

3/4 cup vegetable oil

2 tblsp vinegar

2 tsp vanilla

Combine flour, sugar, cocoa, baking soda and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add water, oil, vinegar and vanilla; beat 3 minutes at medium speed or until thoroughly blended. Pour batter into a greased and floured rectangular cake pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes.

edited to add: this is NOT from a vegan cookbook, and I am not a vegan...I have however given the recipe to several vegan friends who've pronounced it usable. I hope it works for you guys.

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edited to add: this is NOT from a vegan cookbook, and I am not a vegan...I have however given the recipe to several vegan friends who've pronounced it usable. I hope it works for you guys.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

How's the taste? There's a difference (at least to me) between usable and really good.

Of course, some of it can be a factor of how long it's been since you've had something. I haven't had aged cheese in over a year -- I bought some vegetarian/soy swiss cheese the other day and told my partner I thought it was very realistic and good. She tried a slice and told me that I only think it tastes like swiss cheese because I haven't had any of the real stuff in so long.

Fiona

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http://www.veganfamily.co.uk/kitchen.html has some decent looking recipies as well.

Think I'll give the peppery pumpkin soup recipie they have here a shot.

Just cause I can't imagine what pumpkin soup tastes like. =P

I'm not vegan, but I also don't eat meat often and never eat pork or fish and very rarely beef.

What's the difference in a vegan and a vegetarian, anyway?

One doesn't eat dairy products?

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Vegetarians don't eat meat and *may* also exclude eggs and milk. 

Vegans don't consume any animal products whatsoever:  dairy, eggs, meat, gelatin, shell extracts, fish oils....  Most also refuse to wear or otherwise use animal products, such as leather and wool. 

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Vegans don't consume any animal products whatsoever:  dairy, eggs, meat, gelatin, shell extracts, fish oils....  Most also refuse to wear or otherwise use animal products, such as leather and wool.

I'm just curious... why not wool? It doesn't harm the animal. I can understand leather, but am perplexed by wool.

I think it's over animal servitude?  Conditions for many sheep kept for wool are atrocious. 

I'm a bad vegan, though.  I eat honey.  I occasionally eat fish if I'm going out of my mind in part from poor nutrition, because I have certain meals which stabilize me, and one includes fish.  My boots have leather in them (because it would have cost four times as much to have fully synthetic footwear, and I am a poor unemployed schmuck).  I try to reduce my animal consumption as much as possible and as much as seems reasonable in order to be more earth-friendly, and as that means eating virtually no animal products, I call myself a vegan.  Purists would disagree.  I'm a vegan in order to abide by my own convictions, though, not theirs, and I will continue to do so as far as is reasonably possible. 

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