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Could it be....


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Last night I was watching a program on comas and brain injuries. The though ran through my head when they were describing how the frontal lobe is so often injured in car accidents.

How many of us have had one?

I had a very serious one when I was 16. Slammed into a phone pole sideways and I was ejected through side window. Was unconscience for at least 10 minutes.

BTW this is a source of PTSS for me. Now I wonder it this could have been the 'reason' for the BP later in life. No one else in fam is MI

btw this happened in 1966 if I recall. No MRI at the time. I do recall that a week later I had to take the SATs. Bummer. That is why I didn't go to Harvard  ;)

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I read your post and could almost feel the pain of that car crash... There is a very good chance that damage could have been done.. One of the problems the doc has is when they test organs, brains or whatever they dont have a before picture to match it up with.. So if something small shows up it could have been there from birth... I once had a motorcycle accident that damaged a kidney.. I was in the hospital for a week or two.. Later on in life I had some kidney problems,, it showed that my kidney was not the normal shape.. But the problems went away and the doc said I was probably born with it.. I asked him about the accident and he said no way to tell without a before picture... Anyway the new MRI is the best test for checking out the brain.. only if you have insurance... It is very expensive.. The new MRI can fine tune the picture and detect all kinds of stuff... I am no doctor but I am a chemist in R&D.. in the Pharma area... been doing it for thirty years.. I have seen a lot of amazing new technology.. It would be worth a look at that brain just to if anything elimanate a potential cause....

Peace be with you and hope all goes well..

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I had an extremely bad horse riding accident a few years back. Was out on my best competition horse, he was spooked by some dogs and ended up careering down a steep cobbled hill at a flat out gallop. I came off backwards and smacked my head on the road. Was concussed for a week after and trashed my riding hat. The poor horse galloped smack into a stone wall and was never able to race again, but that's an aside. Anyway, I wondered if there was a link between head injuries and BP. Asked my pdoc this one time, but she shrugged, said she didn't know and that my illness was just 'one of those things'. I do have MI in my family, possibly BP, so it's not entirely strange that I've got it....but who knows?

Oh, and at the time of the accident, I was 16 and a half. I was nearly 18 when I first started with outwardly noticeable MI symptoms.

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Well, at least for me, this theory doesn't fit...at least not entirely. I had BP symptoms from as far back as I can remember. Later I had bunches of accidents, horseback riding and otherwise. Was dropped on my head once by my sister. Who knows? Maybe it added to my BP, but I was there already.

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I for one think that there MIGHT be some correlations between head injuries and later MI. Almost impossible to prove however. Did anyone else see that show on DHC regarding the fellow that woke after 19 years in a coma? Later in the program when talking about car accidents is when I made a correlation.

So far it sure looks like most respondants here have had some sort of head trauma, but then this is not a good survey. I'd like to see a general survey at the top and see what comes out with larger numbers of respondants.

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I think we're talking apples and oranges here.  Sure, it's the frontal lobe which is responsible for the higher order functions of brain activity but one causal factor for the behavioural change is trauma and the other is neurochemical.  It's not like brain trauma will suddenly induce changes in serotonin or dopamine reuptake, as an example.  At least not that I know of.  Or have heard of.  But who knows?  A tumour? That's something different.  Could something like that be a culprit? Dunno.  But tumours are organic...and something else entirely...still nothing to do with trauma.

Now I'm going off topic.

Remember Phineas Gage? He wasn't bipolar.  Quite "normal" before that ol' tamping iron incident...hehe.

But I do agree that head trauma can cause behavioural changes...absolutely.  Would those changes be diagnosable as bipolar disorder? I'm a little doubtful on that one.  The changes may be something that *looks* like bipolar disorder but actually isn't.

For example.  I suffer from simple partial seizures but I have not been given a diagnosis of TLE.  In fact, we're not quite sure why they're even happening.  My neuro thinks it's because of migraines.  I didn't even know that was possible.  I'm more inclined to think they are idiopatic.  Po-TAY-to...Po-TAH-to...my meds work...whatever.

But the point is, the brain can do all sorts of things that look like one thing but in actual fact, is really something else and both doctors and patients can't ever really know for certain what the cause or answer is.

Now that I've made everything clear as mud... *grin*

Karen

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Now that I've made everything clear as mud... *grin*

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

*makes mud pies*

my grandmother had an aneurysm in her 40s; lived until her 70s

physical impacts of course.. and much of the deal was psychological i think. changed so much, i think she was a different person. i never knew her before. but some of what she went through also had an impact on the family similar to impact of MI (as seen through other side of family).

*makes mud forks and plates*

..

*makes mud alien*

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